LPN to RN - page 2

Hi, I was just wondering if there are people on here that have started out as an LPN and completed the bridge-in to their RN? Where did you do your program and are you satisfied with being an RN... Read More

  1. by   saskrn
    Quote from KimFutureLPN
    Hi,

    I was just wondering if there are people on here that have started out as an LPN and completed the bridge-in to their RN? Where did you do your program and are you satisfied with being an RN as opposed to an LPN? I'm trying to get some feedback on either staying as an LPN or going on to being an RN. I'm going to be graduating as an LPN in June.....thanks!

    Kim
    I am an RN not an LPN, so I really can't comment on any bridge programs, however it seems that you may have a wider variety of positions as an RN. Good luck!
  2. by   LPN1974
    What is an RPN??
    Excuse my ignorance, I just don't know all these abbreviations.
  3. by   paulacath
    An RPN is a registered practical nurse. Some provinces call them LPNs - licensed practical nurse. Depending on which province you are the education is different.

    In Ontario, an RPN now needs two years of college and receives a diploma. Their scope of practice is the "stable" patient.

    hope that helps!
  4. by   LPN1974
    Quote from paulacath
    An RPN is a registered practical nurse. Some provinces call them LPNs - licensed practical nurse. Depending on which province you are the education is different.

    In Ontario, an RPN now needs two years of college and receives a diploma. Their scope of practice is the "stable" patient.

    hope that helps!
    OK, so is that like a Licensed Practical Nurse in the US?
    Sounds like your RPN has more education than an LPN.
    Thanks for replying.
  5. by   Lanceman
    Quote from bizzymum919
    LPN's are getting phased out in many positions and they are mostly "grandfathering" the ones already on the units. If you want to specialize in a certain area it is best to go for your RN. I am going into the bridge program (LPN -RN) so that I will be more marketable. With a RN, or even in some cases a BSN, you can go anywhere and not really worry about qualifications.

    Here in North Florida and South Georgia I see almost as many ads for LPN's as I see for RN's. I personally know several LPN's and they have had no problem finding jobs, and decent paying ones at that. I know a married couple, both LPN's, the husband(only been out of school a year) makes $21 an hour with benefits in LTC and the wife makes $26 an hour part-time(no benefits) at a nearby major hospital. The small rural hospital here pays LPNs about $15 an hour. Most of the LTC's and all the hospitals(6 or 7) within 50 miles of here employ LPN's so its not a dead profession yet. But most LPN-RN bridge programs are only a year long(after you get your pre-reqs done of course) so that would be the route to go in my opinion. I've seen some bridge programs that require a year or six months of LPN work experience for admission.
  6. by   Fiona59
    When you say two years, do you mean four academic semesters? That's how it was done back when I trained in Alberta, but we only had two weeks off between semesters and completed all four in 13 months.


    LPN to RN bridge works differently for us Lanceman. Most provinces no longer have diploma RN's, so we are required to bridge into a BScN degree. We get one years credit, take a bridging course, and are then admitted to year 2 of a 4 year degree. Gets expensive usually around $500/3cr. course (fees depend upon which province you live in). Plus books, etc. So approximately six semesters averaging five courses a semester, $15K for tuition alone, if I've got my math right. I only plan on working until I'm 60, so I might have just paid off my student loans....

    So, like someone else said, I like my line of work, my wages aren't that bad, and I don't have to write a load of essays, deal with student politics, and can walk the dog when I want after work...
  7. by   Canadian_Gal
    Here, (IMO ) in one of the most beautiful places in the world (Vancouver, BC) RPN is a Registered Psychiatric Nurse. You can get a Diploma in Psychiatric Nursing by completing a 6 semester, 24 month/2yr program. I hope that helps too! Also the LPN training here is still one year, but soon to be moved into a two year program. I am starting my 1yr course end of Feb/2005. Looking forward to it!


    Quote from paulacath
    An RPN is a registered practical nurse. Some provinces call them LPNs - licensed practical nurse. Depending on which province you are the education is different.

    In Ontario, an RPN now needs two years of college and receives a diploma. Their scope of practice is the "stable" patient.

    hope that helps!
  8. by   loriangel14
    I am constantly amazed by the number of different titles, even in one country. I am in an rpn program and I will be a registered practical nurse when I graduate. The college I go to has a full time rpn program that is 2 and a half years. I am going part time ( 2 nights /week, ALL year around) that will take me 4 yrs to finish. Thankfully I have been getting help from my family so I will have no debt when I get out. Later when my kids are older I hope to take the bridge and get my degree.

    I would like to hear from other people in a similar position. Best of luck to all you students out there.
  9. by   Ontario
    Quote from KimFutureLPN
    Hi,

    I was just wondering if there are people on here that have started out as an LPN and completed the bridge-in to their RN? Where did you do your program and are you satisfied with being an RN as opposed to an LPN? I'm trying to get some feedback on either staying as an LPN or going on to being an RN. I'm going to be graduating as an LPN in June.....thanks!

    Kim

    Check with your nursing schools and see what they offer. If I only knew when I was a younger new nurse what I know now I would have continued my education. Take a lesson from and older wiser nurse and go and get that RN degree. You can do it
  10. by   HOMESICKLPN
    couldn't help but notice your comments...sorr to butt in, i am a canadian lpn, trained in bc and working in ab. i am also young and blonde

    the 1. we had one discriminatory teacher in bc. my friend who was mature and foreign (permanent resident). she was failed on a project and not prenitted to carry on or make up her assignment-it was a minor assignment.
    she fought it, got rewrite option for all students and came back the next year to graduate with me....good for her!also my friend started originally in the same class as her daughter, who was my age...wouldn't that be wild

    that teacher had been teaching forever and i had been warned to watch my p's and q's around her, her a year before i started school, but she was the only teacher like that. she was the head for the department but she is no longer. though she still teaches...she did have some great qualities (she was freaken hilarious sometimes!!!!)..she was flabergasted when everyone in my class passed.

    the year i started they changed from first come first serve enrollment to grade based acceptance (the bar was high ) to meet the demands of the job market. i guess before a lot of people failed before that


    2. my employer offers financial assistance for education to employees in exchange for commitment to return for a minimum number of years employment. (care aide to lpn or lpn to rpn or even just for advanced eduaction or workshops) there are all kinds of corespondance, remote part time study courses available in edmonton. i have friends enrolled who work, do correspondance and commute to school for labs and workshops.

    any who, 'just goes to show you never can tell - i find there's a lot of that i nursing now a day
  11. by   HOMESICKLPN
    sorry if my message was confusing, it was directed to saskrn, fionna59 and blackbird's comments...i'm new at this discussions stuff.
    :uhoh21:
  12. by   pugmum
    Quote from HOMESICKLPN
    sorry if my message was confusing, it was directed to saskrn, fionna59 and blackbird's comments...i'm new at this discussions stuff.
    :uhoh21:
    Hi Homesiclklpn ..no worries about being new, I am too. Nice to talk to Canucks from all over. http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/26/26_7_8.gifI noticed this thread is a little old, but the following info might be applicable.

    As previously posted, some provinces no longer have diploma RNs. In BC entry to practice is now a BSN. RNs who trained in the "diploma days" are still considered RNs and are not required to obtain their degree, but unfortunately PCC, CNE, and most of the infection control and other what I call Mon-Fri "day jobs" require a degree. Universities offer post-RN to BSN degrees for these nurses.

    Many community colleges are affilitated with universities...you now would take the first 2 years toward your degree at the CC, then complete associated with a university. To make matters a little more complicated, some of the CC have now become universities, so are granting their own BSN degrees...or go the full university route for 4 years.:chuckle

    Regarding LPNs (in BC RPNs are registered psych nurses), most programs are 1 crammed full year! the College of LPNs in BC wants all LPNs to be working at full scope by 2007 ...those who graduated earlier and have not had pharmacology are either required to upgrade, or work with a restricted lisence after that date. (or this is my understanding speaking tothe LPNs working on my unit). On our unit, LPNs do work at full scope.

    There is no LPN to RN program in BC that I am aware of, but in AB Athabasca University has an online program with a practicum component that must be taken in AB....again, info from an LPN I know. I am not aware of any other bridging programs, in the east.

    And regarding phasing out of LPNs, I highly doubt it....there just plain aren't enough nurses. There are lots (TONS) of jobs for RNs in BC (most definitely in my health authority), and still jobs available for LPNs.

    I would encourage you to complete your BSN. You will have more options for the future and you'll never be out of work.

    Regarding education paid for by the employer, many health authorities in BC will pay for specialy education for RNs. There is a shortage of OR, ER, CC nurses especially, and my health authority offers 100% reimbursement (wages, books) while you are going to school. The only program that I am aware of at this time for LPNs is an OR Tech program they have started for LPNs, but there may be others.

    Sorry if this is rambling or useless info for you, but perhaps will help someone!
  13. by   HOMESICKLPN
    Regarding LPNs (in BC RPNs are registered psych nurses), most programs are 1 crammed full year! the College of LPNs in BC wants all LPNs to be working at full scope by 2007 ...those who graduated earlier and have not had pharmacology are either required to upgrade, or work with a restricted lisence after that date. (or this is my understanding speaking tothe LPNs working on my unit). On our unit, LPNs do work at full scope.


    i was trained in sept 2004 in bc and the intake before me and my class all had pharmacology, im and subq, iv monitoring and med admin. my course was indeed a cram packed year. do the lpn's on your unit hang iv bags? in my practicum i was told lpn's weren't allowed esp with k+. but where i work now if you have the courses lpn's can do all but meds on peripheral lines (including initiation). i work in alberta now, i started in acute care and i really had a hard time, too many new things (new grad, first job, new hospital, new unit, new province) i';m in extended care no and i like it but the lay out of the building makes me basically on my own (the rn is on anther floor). it's alittle more charge than i ever wanted and i don't get to spend much time with my patients at all. too much paper work.
    anywho nuff said
    yahooo bc rocks!!!! going back in the spring!!!!

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