LPN jobs in BC - page 2

Hi everyone. :wavey: I'm in Alberta and have found there are plenty of LPN jobs here -- most grads don't have much trouble finding work. Does anyone know the situation in BC for LPNs? Looking at the... Read More

  1. by   Fiona59
    There are more PRIVATE colleges offereing PN education in BC. Places like Sprott Shaw and Academy of Learning. Places that 20 years ago were training secretaries are now getting into healthcare provider training. I don't know if places like VCC got additional seats or not.


    I know that they offer a bridge for PCA's to become LPN's. They offered them a few times and then the ads seemed to disappear...
  2. by   Cyberglen
    Thanks Fiona, Shari...

    That's exciting news about Alberta, although I would need to invest in a good jacket --something I lack now. The comment about pumping out new LPN's in BC when there is no demand made me laugh and shake my head in wonder. Alright then, I actually have a dear old friend in Edmonton (haven't seen him in 25 years) --good old Tyler. I don't want to stray too far off topic, but we want to feel safe and secure and I understand that Alberta is fairly conservative. I respect that, but don't wish to be a target, and don't want to disrupt anyone's way of life. I kind of like to blend in if I can. Are there large cities where one can, uh, blend in?
  3. by   shari5408
    I think Edmonton is a good bet for "blending in". Don't know about Calgary as I've never lived there. Alberta as a whole is very conservative -- too conservative for me, anyway -- but judging by the people I've met during my eight years here, it's more the government that's so conservative. The people I know are pretty open and accepting.
  4. by   Fiona59
    I've lived in both Calgary and Edmonton. People are people. When we lived in Calgary it made me think of Dallas North, lots of cattle and oil. I find Edmonton to be slower paced.

    Yes, our politicians are Conservative but I've met some people over the years who are far from it.

    Edmonton has a thriving arts and theatre community, good restaurants, and yup it does go down below -30C in January. But that's why there are all inclusive vacations!

    I don't know why you might think you'd feel threatened more here than anywhere else. Your sig. other is human, right? Wait, that's Washington state where bestiality is still not a crime, (found that out while living on the coast, we got all of Seattle's news stations). I mean just the other week, we had a really sweet marriage announcement in the Sunday paper, it was baby's first birthday and the day Daddy and Poppa picked to get married. Didn't hear of any hate crimes after the announcement...
  5. by   fergus51
    Alberta's premier was definitely the most vocal opponent of the gay marriage bill, but I don't think that means Alberta as a whole is too conservative. It's never gonna be like Vancouver as far as liberalism, but I always thought Edmonton and Calgary were nice (other than in the wintertime).
  6. by   Cyberglen
    I am starting to feel like a real pest. You'll have to excuse me. Instead of wanting a sports car, or an affair my midlife crisis expresses itself by making me want to move to another country. I take it that all of your comments regarding the closed shop for nurses would pertain to Vancouver, as well, or might that be a special case? (I am trying to keep an open mind about Alberta, but I am not sure I am tough enough for real weather, having been weaned in Southern California!). You all are too much. If I could just make you my neighbors, I probably wouldn't want to leave.
  7. by   FungManX
    Quote from Cyberglen
    I am starting to feel like a real pest. You'll have to excuse me. Instead of wanting a sports car, or an affair my midlife crisis expresses itself by making me want to move to another country. I take it that all of your comments regarding the closed shop for nurses would pertain to Vancouver, as well, or might that be a special case? (I am trying to keep an open mind about Alberta, but I am not sure I am tough enough for real weather, having been weaned in Southern California!). You all are too much. If I could just make you my neighbors, I probably wouldn't want to leave.
    Hey, just want to make a comment.
    You should probably get in contact with a few law firms up here to see if
    any of them are hiring.. maybe you can work for a 2-3 years as a lawyer
    while your husband does a two year LPN - RN (Bachelor) degree program at
    any local community college ( Kwantlen,Douglas,Langara, etc... [vancouver])

    Not only would that land your husband a job in Vancouver/V.island, but
    should you ever decide to migrate elsewhere in the world, your husbands
    degree will be recognized pretty much everywhere in the world.
  8. by   Fiona59
    Just to correct a few things that the FungMan has posted. LPN's are required to do a bridge course and are then admitted to year 2 of a four year BScN course. There are often waitlists for this route. I've met a few LPN's in BC, who have just bit the bullet and gone back and applied and been accepted as first year students in the BScN. The bridge only works if there are available seats in the second year of the programme.

    Southern Alberta is nice, never lived there but the MIL thought about retiring to Lethbridge from Vancouver. Cost of property was a lot cheaper, smaller town, closer to the grandchildren but not next door....

    Your not a pest Cyberglen. We'll answer what questions we can. I really don't know much about lawyers moving north of the 49th. You'd best check with a provincial bar association. Just out of curiosity, would you practice as a barrister or solicitor? Even though they train a both, they specialize in a firm. Maybe you'd have to do a refresher/conversion course? I mean our criminal law is different, no Miranda Rights, no death penalty, the Young Offenders Act or whatever they call it these days... Oh, and you'd have to buy the black robes. Our courts can be a bit more formal than yours down south.
  9. by   FungManX
    Thanks for the correction Fiona!
    Sorry, I'm just a second year student so pretty much still fresh out of highschool.. and I'm not part of the nursing curriculum either so.., I don't want to be messing up anyone's future because of my under-informed posts hehe..

    but yeah, feel free to point out mistakes I've made so I can learn more about the application process (and other things) as well
  10. by   barbiedee
    I wouldn't say BC is a closed shop for LPN's, there is just an over supply of LPN's for the jobs available. Unfortunately, the government of the moment does not support the union which currently includes LPN's (see previous posts re: wage rollbacks and increased work week). In many places LPN's are working to "full scope" (ie: administering medications on acute as well as long term care wards. For a detailed list of scope of practice for BC LPN's refer to the College of LPN's of BC website at www.clpnbc.org ) in other places, many LPN's are working as nurses aids just to have a full time job. (including me.) I would suggest you contact the College of LPN's of B.C. at the above website and get their input. The would probably be able to give you a better over view of the current LPN job market as they see it. I can only give you my opinion on the job market in my particular locale. (Central Vancouver Island) Although I am sure you would NOT be able to get a working visa as a nurses aid, it would be an option (to work as an aid instead of an LPN). The salary difference between an aid and an LPN is about one dollar an hour, so money-wise, it isn't all that much after taxes etc. (In fact with the high cost of our yearly LPN license, its probably a break even situation.)
    I do live in a beautiful part of the world, no doubt, but not one that opens its arms to incoming LPN's unfortunately. Now lawyers....that's another topic!
  11. by   Cyberglen
    ....why a peaceful, sensible nation such as your own would have any need for lawyers, who are steeped in conflict, discord and trouble, but if you need me, I will come, with wig on! You've thrown me with the barrister/solicitor distinction. Since I rarely appear in court I would, if recollection serves, be closer to a solicitor than a barrister. I try to stay out of court -- and to keep my clients out of court as well. However, if a barrister gets to wear a robe and other finery, than a barrister I would much rather serve as a barrister --what a blast that would be, and the pictures I could send back home!

    This forum has been so helpful. I am very grateful. I have no reason to stop working, other than I would like to do so for awhile (I've worked constantly since I was 16), and so maybe the smarter course would be for me to see if I can gain employment up there. It would certainly be a challenge, and perhaps even a lot of fun. As for my partner, I will encourage him in very subtle ways to go for his RN with a BSN (I think I have that right). Or he can always cut hair, his previous occupation!

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