Language issues....

  1. Wherever you are nursing, is language an issue?
    Strictly french.

    I don't get this. I wish I could speak french fluently but I am not classified as bilingual. Therefore, I am never successful with "designated" nursing positions.

    Just curious if this is an issue where you are nursing.

    Please advise.

    Thanks
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   lalaxton
    I think that is an issue in Quebec only.
  4. by   Flynurse
    If you are talking about getting a position as a nurse just because you aren't fluent in French....well, that just seems wrong to me.

    If I weren't allowed to float to the Peds unit because 60% of the parents don't speak English, but rather Spanish, Vietnamese and Arabic, then I would be quite upset. Not being able to speak a language doesn't affect what a good nurse you are. In many facilities in the USA translators are available to explain important information to the patients.

    Sorry to hear about your problem...best luck to you!
  5. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    Lalaxton,
    That is a problem in northern Ontario. It's discriminating to me but not to their beliefs. Bilingualism is two languages not just french and english. Maybe I am living in the wrong neck of the woods. I have sisters in TO who tell me there isn't anything of the sort with there multicultural city.
    Flynurse,
    Thanks for your reply. I appreciated it.
    Sarah
  6. by   Little One2
    It would be beneficial to have a second language. Toronto is such a diverse city. There are many cultures here. Half the patients you have don't speak english.

    There is usually no discrimination. Unless, the job advertises specifically that they what a specific language. Such as a french speaking nurse.

    The hospitals seem to want to hire more international nurses then the nurses who actually live in the city. Which I find is wrong.
  7. by   CHICKTOEAGLE
    N.B. is the 'OFFICIAL' bilingual province of Canada. That being said...it poses a great problem when applying for a position.Iam fluent in both French and English.MY mother tongue is English. In my area, over the last 20+yrs., Ihave seen attitudes change in a negative manner towards unilingual health care providers on both sides. It can get very ugly at times...seniority, expertise do not seem to be the focus.Communication skills are important but not to a very ill pt. who needs universally understood care! The problem is much more directed at the English population. This really 'rots my socks'!!!
  8. by   RNonsense
    Come out West, Sarah. We don't play that here...
  9. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    To all,
    Thanks for the reply.
    RNonsense...I just might go west. Thanks for the input.
    Sarah
  10. by   almondhoney
    Personally I don't think it is discrimination, YOU CAN ALL FLAME ME I DON"T CARE!!
    Canada *which is the country in which we live* has 2 official languages, these are FRENCH & ENGLISH. Now granted it is an English world, but we live in Canada and part of our heritage is having both languages. (FRENCH & ENGLISH)

    Ok stepping off my soap box!!

    On another note, French seems more prevalent in Northern Ontario & Quebec. So you may want to make your choices given the information you have received here.
  11. by   RNonsense
  12. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    Thanks again for the info. RNonsense.

    Almondhoney, nobody will flame you because we are all ADULTS and this BB is to post, vent or whatever. If disrespect is shown then you'd be FLAMED or REMOVED.

    Sarah
  13. by   lalaxton
    Just a thought... A large part of our jobs is communication. With patients and with each other. If language is a problem then the patient is the ultimate loser. If your population speaks a language that you do not does this not pose a problem for patient centered care??
  14. by   epg_pei
    Originally posted by Sarah, RNBScN
    Wherever you are nursing, is language an issue?
    Strictly french.

    I don't get this. I wish I could speak french fluently but I am not classified as bilingual. Therefore, I am never successful with "designated" nursing positions.

    Just curious if this is an issue where you are nursing.

    Please advise.

    Thanks
    I am in a prediminantly English-speaking area of New Brunswick, and I can get along fine, but in other regions being able to speak French would be a highly valued asset.

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