I need advice

  1. Help!! anyone?

    I'm planning to take up nursing and hope to be an RN in two years time. I've heard of this school PPTS or Philippine Paramedical & Technical School.Is this O.K.? Would I be able to take the CGFNS & NCLEX after I will pass the TESDA competency exams?
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   sirI
    Hello, nora123 and welcome to allnurses.com

    I moved your thread to the International forum for a better response. suzanne4, the moderator for this forum, will be along later to assist you.

    Enjoy the site!!
  4. by   P_RN
    Suzanne4 and Lawrence01 are our Philippine Nurses specialists. Hopefully they will be by soon. In briefly scanning the courses taught at that school it seems they are 2 year Nursing diplomas. I do know that the US will not allow AD graduates to gain employment.
    Last edit by P_RN on Mar 5, '07
  5. by   lawrence01
    Only a minimum degree in Bachelors of Science in Nursing ( 4 yr. program) will be allowed to migrate to the US. Also, the Philippine's Nursing Act of 2002 only recognizes B.S.N. and the M.A.N. that's why you will not see a 2 yr. ADN program on majority of nursing schools. This Nursing Act of 2002 also doesn't recognize Vocational/Practical Nursing Programs that has also proliferated.

    Those two 2 yr. programs are only available since those providing it has attached it on a "ladderized' program but those 2 programs in itself cannot be used for migration purposes for the US nor those who graduated from there can apply for a job in the Philippines w/ just an ADN or a graduate of Vocational/Practical Nursing since it is not recognized by the Philippine's Nursing Act of 2002.

    It is a dead-end program to be blunt both in the Philippines and for trying to work abroad. Most who under went those programs ended up "ladderizing" their ADNs to have their BSNs for an additional 2 yrs. Might as well just go for a 4 yr. BSN program from the start. This is the reason why if you go to the well established Nursing Schools you will never see a 2 yr ADN program being offered.

    Just go for the straight-up BSN program.
  6. by   john83
    Quote from lawrence01
    Only a minimum degree in Bachelors of Science in Nursing ( 4 yr. program) will be allowed to migrate to the US. Also, the Philippine's Nursing Act of 2002 only recognizes B.S.N. and the M.A.N. that's why you will not see a 2 yr. ADN program on majority of nursing schools. This Nursing Act of 2002 also doesn't recognize Vocational/Practical Nursing Programs that has also proliferated.

    Those two 2 yr. programs are only available since those providing it has attached it on a "ladderized' program but those 2 programs in itself cannot be used for migration purposes for the US nor those who graduated from there can apply for a job in the Philippines w/ just an ADN or a graduate of Vocational/Practical Nursing since it is not recognized by the Philippine's Nursing Act of 2002.

    It is a dead-end program to be blunt both in the Philippines and for trying to work abroad. Most who under went those programs ended up "ladderizing" their ADNs to have their BSNs for an additional 2 yrs. Might as well just go for a 4 yr. BSN program from the start. This is the reason why if you go to the well established Nursing Schools you will never see a 2 yr ADN program being offered.

    Just go for the straight-up BSN program.
    I wonder if there will ever be a "double degree" to be offered in the Philippines like in the US(where they have a BSN/MSN or accelerated BSN-MSN-PhD program or BSN/PhD program where both/all degrees will be conferred upon graduation)...
    :studyowl:
  7. by   suzanne4
    I seriously doubt it. There are issues already with not enough clinical training in the BSN, so there would definitely be issues with the higher degrees. I mean with having enough patients to give adequate patient care assignments. Currently there are about 15 plus nursing students per one patient.

    Most of the MSN tracks in the US are Advanced Practice nursing or Clinical Specialist training, and both of those require that hours be done in the US, as they also require additional licensure.

    Check out the MSN/PhD forums that we have here for more specifics on the requirements.
  8. by   john83
    Quote from suzanne4
    I seriously doubt it. There are issues already with not enough clinical training in the BSN, so there would definitely be issues with the higher degrees. I mean with having enough patients to give adequate patient care assignments. Currently there are about 15 plus nursing students per one patient.

    Most of the MSN tracks in the US are Advanced Practice nursing or Clinical Specialist training, and both of those require that hours be done in the US, as they also require additional licensure.

    Check out the MSN/PhD forums that we have here for more specifics on the requirements.
    Thanks for the feedback ma'am Suzanne!:kiss
  9. by   suzanne4
    You are very welcome.:angel2:
  10. by   nora123
    Thanks for the advice guys. You're all very helpful.

    By the way Ma'am Suzanne & Sir Laurence, I still am still curious about the 2 yr RN course offered by PPTS. Will its graduates be able to take the CGFNS & NCLEX after passing the TESDA comptency exams?

    I'm just concerned because a friend of mine will soon be graduating from that school and is looking forward to taking the CGFNS & NCLEX. She hopes to be joining soon her husband in the States who at present has a working visa. Will she be able to find work as an RN even if she is just a dependent of a holder of a working visa?
  11. by   lawrence01
    Quote from nora123
    Thanks for the advice guys. You're all very helpful.

    By the way Ma'am Suzanne & Sir Laurence, I still am still curious about the 2 yr RN course offered by PPTS. Will its graduates be able to take the CGFNS & NCLEX after passing the TESDA comptency exams?

    I'm just concerned because a friend of mine will soon be graduating from that school and is looking forward to taking the CGFNS & NCLEX. She hopes to be joining soon her husband in the States who at present has a working visa. Will she be able to find work as an RN even if she is just a dependent of a holder of a working visa?
    Can you pls. be more specific on what is the training program? If its Practical Nursing, yes they can take the NCLEX-PN BUT as we said Practical Nurses who graduated in a Phil program are not allowed to migrate to work as PN for the US. A minimum of a BSN degree is needed. Many have done this already. They took the NCLEX-PN BUT no US employer can file a petition to have them work as a PN. Only way is if the nurse is a green card holder already by other means.

    So, if you are not a green card holder already, you cannot be petitioned by a US employer even though you took the NCLEX-PN already. That is the big thing. Yes, you can take the NCLEX-PN but what good is it if no US employer is allowed to petition on your behalf. Only BSN or MAN RNs and Physical Therapists are the ones being petitioned as Schedule A workers

    Taking the NCLEX-PN (Practical Nurse) and passing it would do you no good and what these people doesn't know is that passing a US licensure exam does not grant the passer automatic privilege to migrate. This is what they do not understand. The immigration process is another thing. Not even all BSNs who passed the NCLEX-RN (Reg. Nurse) are able to migrate for one reason or another but this is a diff. story all together.

    Many Gov't officials and Deans and owners of these practical nursing schools doesn't understand these. And if you have followed the news in the Philippines
    lately, even the members of the BON and the PRC Chairperson doesn't know the migration req'ts of BSN nurses as well. The US Embassy had to step in and correct them by saying that the Visa Screen Certificate is needed by all.
    Last edit by lawrence01 on Mar 6, '07
  12. by   nora123
    A million thanks.
  13. by   suzanne4
    And the friend's husband may have a owrking visa, but she will be going over only as a dependent, she will be unable to work in any capacity in the US without a visa of her own that permits work. Currently there is a retrogression in place, and a two year program like this does not qualify for a visa to work in the US.

    First clue is that it is thru a technical school, US gvernment requires the professional degree for licensure in the US, and from your country that means the BSN. Anything less and it will not be accepted. Nursing in the US does not use those competencies either.

    Two year RN programs that are not second courser programs and offer the BSN are not accepted in the US. These skills promote that the nurse can sit for an exam, but they forget that US immigration requires a visa to be able to work. Licensure is not the same as immigration and they have two separate requirements. You cannot work without the visa.

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