From Italy!

  1. Hi!
    I'm a student and I come from Italy. In a few months I'm going to finish my studies, but I need some information that I cant find in any website.
    I'd like to know about the emergency and accident dept:
    What are nurse's in charge tasks?
    Who is the supervisor or manager?
    Who is the "hello nurse"?
    What does the Triage Manchester Sistem made up? Is it used in all the hospitals in Uk? If not, what else Triage sistem is used?

    I did my apprenticeship in St.Thomas hospital in London in E&A dept and I saw that there was a minor treatment room, a major treatment room, and a resuscitation room. Has every public hospital the same rooms?

    Do you work with protocols in E&A?
    Is there a list of nurse's competencies in emergency? or rules, or tasks?

    I hope someone could help me! :wink2:

    Sorry about my English: I hope everything was clear! :imbar

    Bye bye

    Francesca
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    I can answer some of your questions based on the US system, sorry unable to answer your questions about the UK system.

    Number of rooms in the ER will depend on the number of patients seen per year and the size of the hospital. Most hospitals will have a trauma or code room, plus multiple treatment rooms. There are usually separate rooms used for GYN exams as well as separate rooms used for casting or splinting, when possible.

    The "Hello" nurse that you refer to is the traige nurse. At some hospitals the receptionist sees the paitient first, but it should be the nurse that sees every patient first to have them "triaged".
    The charge nurse is responsible for scheduling the staff for the day, making assignments as to which area the nurse will cover, etc. She/he is responsible for any problems that occur on that shift.
    The manager usually has 24 hour responsibility for the unit.

    In most US hospitals the supervisor actually works out the nursing office and not directly out of the ER. It is usually called the "shift supervisor" for the hospital. Depending on the size of the hospital, there may be two or three supervisors, each covering different areas.

    Hope that this helps you.................................
  4. by   suzanne4
    Most ERs have standing orders that can be done without the patient being first seen by the ER doctor. Usually if it is a suspected fracture of an extremity, the patient can be sent to x-ray. For chest pain, you would apply oxygen, check vital signs, get an EKG, and give NTG if the patient hasn't already takien it at home. If they have, you would want to find out if they had a little "tingle" under their tongue, and how old the pills are.................
  5. by   Silverdragon102
    [QUOTE=suzanne4]I can answer some of your questions based on the US system, sorry unable to answer your questions about the UK system.

    Number of rooms in the ER will depend on the number of patients seen per year and the size of the hospital. Most hospitals will have a trauma or code room, plus multiple treatment rooms. There are usually separate rooms used for GYN exams as well as separate rooms used for casting or splinting, when possible.

    The "Hello" nurse that you refer to is the traige nurse. At some hospitals the receptionist sees the paitient first, but it should be the nurse that sees every patient first to have them "triaged".
    The charge nurse is responsible for scheduling the staff for the day, making assignments as to which area the nurse will cover, etc. She/he is responsible for any problems that occur on that shift.
    The manager usually has 24 hour responsibility for the unit.

    Hello Suzanne,
    This is also a roughly how we work in the UK, glad to see some things are the same between the UK and US I am hopefully moving to AZ at the end of the year to work and hopefully wont find it too stressful between how things are done in the US and UK
    Anna

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