Engineers who switched to nursing - page 2

I am an engineering graduate and am planning on taking up nursing. Do you think I have what it takes to pass BSN and eventually, NCLEX and NLE? Is there any engineer here who is now a nurse? I'd love... Read More

  1. by   goddess RN
    hi

    dont worry about going to nursing school..like others say that if you really want to pursue nursing then go for it..i myself is an industrial engr. in the phil. i worked for 2 yrs as IE then i resigned and attended nursing school...i am an RN here now in LA..yah, paradigm shift but its worth it..go for it
  2. by   dindog
    Am not afraid I'll be the oldest stude in class because I'm sure I will be not that guy! My wife's classmate is 47! First time I saw the guy I thought he was wearing a hairpiece! Thank you all for the encouragement. I'll be disposing all my assets come January. It'll be a big gamble but I am very willing to take the risk. I'm also expecting tough times ahead for me and my family but when it's all well and done, I think we'll be ok. Am doing this for the kids. Good luck to us all.
  3. by   goddess RN
    its sure is a big gamble and risk but like i said its all worth it...nursing school is really tough esp finishing it in phil. coz you need to be full time student in order for you to graduate on time......not like here in US that some nursing students here can still go part time job..anyhow, taking the big leap is really worth it when it comes to future family plans..God bless you on your plans:spin: :spin:
  4. by   Rep
    Quote from dindog
    Am not afraid I'll be the oldest stude in class because I'm sure I will be not that guy! My wife's classmate is 47! First time I saw the guy I thought he was wearing a hairpiece! Thank you all for the encouragement. I'll be disposing all my assets come January. It'll be a big gamble but I am very willing to take the risk. I'm also expecting tough times ahead for me and my family but when it's all well and done, I think we'll be ok. Am doing this for the kids. Good luck to us all.
    Yes, I agree. Most of us do it for our kids.

    I remember on our plane ride from the Philippines, a Filipino beside me asked if my family, 5 of us, were on vacation in the Philippines. I said no and that we are immigrating. He said, " your children's future are secured already."

    I have several reasons why I moved here and one of them is for my kids.

    Your goal in taking up nursing for your kids' future is NOBLE!

    Good luck!
  5. by   samjohns
    Hello to all. Nursing is the way to go. I can't find a job with my engineering degree after I migrated to Australia but completed my nursing in Queensland 2 years ago in my past 40 age and never look back since. I will finish my Master in nursing this sem, I'm earning so much with 2 jobs, my wife finishes her nursing as well this sem while working as enrolled nurse. The chronic worldwide shortage of nursing will always assure one of a job even until retirement age. Areas of nursing specialisation are as broad as the opportunities nursing presents. My family is going home this December to cap a well earned rest. Good luck to all!!
  6. by   paraw
    hi I just arrived here in US as PT-NURSE. My brother who is an engineer working here in New jersey hospital is planning to take up nursing here. My sister in law who is still there in the Philippines (an engineer) is taking up nursing too. Dont worry you can pass those test as long you will be a little(take note) diligent on studying, no need to memorize just analyze.
    Goodluck.
  7. by   RATKIS63
    goodluck, welcome to the noble profession of nursing
  8. by   icky47
    i just cheked out this site...
    http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs....0330/1018/NEWS

    damn thats good news! we could still catch up...=)

    thanks for the encouragement people!!!

    hey when you all get to the US, be Pinoy friendly OK, some pinoys tend to become unfriendly at times...*shrugs*
  9. by   icky47
    get a load of this!!!

    http://www.workpermit.com/news/2006_...ino_nurses.htm
    US looks abroad for nurses, especially to Philippines
  10. by   gentle
    Quote from rnhawaii34
    i will go for it if i were you. most of my former classmates are engineers too, they maybe older than usual nursing students, but they're pretty cool to hang around with. :wink2:


    :yeahthat:
  11. by   arif6666
    Hi,

    I am an engineering graduate working in IT field for 6 years, looking for a carrier change to the field of nursing and I live in USA with H1B visa. I would like to get help/ideas/suggestions from this forum for changing my carrier and other legal activities for my visa to work as a nurse.

    Thanks in advance.
  12. by   Daly City RN
    Quote from am17sg05
    my husband is a computer engineering graduate and worked in the philippines as a comupter programmer.when we went here in the us, he had a tough time finding jobs so he enrolled for the cna course which just lasted for 1 1/2 mo in north carolina. we moved here in new england and he is now working as a cna and is now taking cmt course(when he gets certified, he can pass out meds in a nursing home or assisted living) which he's gonna finish this december.his next step now after this course is lpn.i could not even imagine him switching to healthcare.one time he mentioned to me he hoped that he just took nursing in the phils before as what was advised by his family/relatives.it is really a big transition from an engineer to a nurse but if you're really eager to do it, you can.for the green cards, lately, processing of papers are faster.we got ours in a year provided you got all the requirements.some even got theirs less than a year.goodluck!
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.

    I hope your husband doesn't stop at LPN school. Most of the engineering graduates I met in the past have above average intelligence (and nurses too!), therefore encourage your 'intelligent' husband to proceed to RN school. He is still young and he will probably work for another 20-30 more years. The difference in pay for an LVN/LPN and an RN for that time period is in hundreds of thousands of dollars. RN's are in great demand, while LVN/LPN's are not.

    About a month ago I attended the NURSEWEEK Job Fair that was held at the Hyatt Hotel in Burlingame, Calif. I happened to meet a fellow Filipino guy who just finished RN schooling here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I learned from him that he is an engineering graduate from the Philippines as well. He studied nursing here in the States when he could not work as an engineer here for lack of a professional license I suppose. He is full of hope of finding a lucrative U.S. Nursing job here in the SF Bay Area.

    When I was attending high school at the Far Eastern University in Manila "a long time ago" most of my classmates who had better than average intelligence wanted to become engineers. I, who struggled a little bit in math but found science classes to be very interesting and easy, knew that I could not go to engineering school but I knew I would someday take one of the courses related to science.

    I really didn't realize that I had a relatively easy road to my registered nursing job here in the U.S. until after I heard many of the stories of the recent Filipino arrivals here in the U.S., and the stories and hopes of the writers in this forum. I thank God for my blessings.

    During the post 9/11 economic downturn particularly in California's Silicon Valley, many Filipino-American I.T. professionals/computer engineers had chosen to work as CNA's for that time being. I knew it was hard for those people to work as CNA's who are used to high pays and lots of perks from their former jobs. I don't see them anymore in our medical center and I presume that they are back working in the once again vibrant Silicon Valley.

    If you are an RN here in the U.S., as long as you maintain high professional standards and competency, you can pretty much expect to easily find a high paying nursing job. To the readers in this forum who may already know this but have no experience yet working here in the States ( I can't speak for the Philippine nursing jobs as I did not work there), nursing here in the U.S. is a very demanding and stressful profession. Engineering to Nursing. That's quite a change.

    Indeed.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>.
  13. by   suzanne4
    Quote from arif6666
    Hi,

    I am an engineering graduate working in IT field for 6 years, looking for a carrier change to the field of nursing and I live in USA with H1B visa. I would like to get help/ideas/suggestions from this forum for changing my carrier and other legal activities for my visa to work as a nurse.

    Thanks in advance.
    You will find it very hard to be able to remain with the H1-B visa in nursing as most facilities want nothing to do with them. You will have to complete a full nursing program but then that means that you will not be working full-time in the IT field so you will be unable to maintain that status and will have to chance to F-1 more than likely. And then you have to be aware that the US is under a retrogression and they are not accepting petitions for the AOS, and we do not expect that to open for several years.

    Recommend that you take the time to do some reading about the retrogression on the International Forum.

close