EB-2 visa - page 4

by ice_orange 18,934 Views | 44 Comments

i am a nurse from the philippines, i had graduated from a master's degree from a university here. i'd like to ask if my employer could petition me for an EB-2 visa. i have a pending EB-3 petition as of this date. can anyone give... Read More


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    Second, let's discuss options for those who entered the US on a work visa (aka H1B):

    Let's say your work visa was approved but your work was designated to be an OT in a local hospital in Ohio and you decided to take a master's in nursing informatics. From there, after graduation, you apply for a green card under the EB2 category. Again, what do you think will the USCIS personnel will assume when he sees your file and realizes "hey Mrs. Luzviminda Sanchez entered this country to work as an OT and now she's a nurse?!? What is this person up to? Sounds really fishy to me." Your chances of being approved greatly deteriorates.

    Let's say your work visa was approved and your work was designated as a nurse supervisor in long term care facility in Idaho and you decided to take a master's in nursing informatics. After graduation, same thing, you file your papers. Your chances of being approved are greatly increased. Why? Because your intentions when you entered the country matches appropriately with all your actions. Basically, you entered the country as a nurse and you worked your way up in the nursing world so yes, they (the USCIS personnel) understands this as "ah, Mrs. Luzviminda is a hard-working, career-oriented individual. Her chances of plotting any malicious attacks are negligible."

    This is the point that I've been trying to share with all of you. Just because what I said doesn't correlate with what you want to hear doesn't mean I'm the bad guy. If you would just be less emotional and take a step back, you'd appreciate that I'm actually increasing the odds in your favor. It is never fruitful to risk all your dreams in life just because you're acting on desperation. Again, you are free to not take my $1000 worth of advice.
    Last edit by orangepink on Aug 18, '11
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    Thanks for the tips. But i have a question. First you said Online programs/degrees will never be recognized by USCIS for the EB-2 visa. Then from the examples you gave, you said that online programs greatly deteriorates the chance of getting the visa approved. There's a difference between the two. The former simply means it online schools are not recognized period. The latter means it is recognized but the applicant has a big chance of not getting approved. So which one is it?

    Thanks.
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    Orangepink,

    Do you even know how online programs work? Do you have a master's degree? Well, I happen to have one obtained here in the US and even though my nurse practitioner program was entirely classroom based with clinicals spent in US hospitals, I can speak for the entire nurse practitioner profession and the routes one can take in becoming one including the programs that are offered online. bsnwab was asking specifically about nurse practitioner programs that are offered online. Nurse practitioners are advanced practice nurses who have a graduate degree in nursing (MS or higher) regardless of where you go in the US. That's a prime example of a profession that the EB2 Visa category will qualify for. I don't care what your three lawyers say. There are ways the immigration service can monitor a student in an online program for nurse practitioners. Students log in on the computer regularly in these programs because you have to keep up with online classes just like you do in classrom based programs. Computers have an IP address and can be tracked easily. Clinicals are face to face in an actual healthcare facility in the US and must be done with at leat 500 hours of actual patient care. I say your lawyers are full of it with all the terrorist attack theories. Lawyers are not the expert on how the nursing profession works and the educational paths in advanced practice nursing.
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    Can CRNAs be sponsored under EB-2 category?
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    Just to play devil's advocate, how would USCIS know if your program was online or in person? Most universities give out the same degree certificate with no mention of the online/on the ground status. Unless the school's office of international students wouldn't even let you register for that format..? Provided you do the required clinicals in person, I can't see how it matters if you're sitting in your loungeroom or sitting in a lecture hall for the theory classes.

    Anyone with a US masters degree, relevant licensure, visa screen etc, and a job offer for a position that requires a masters degree, is eligible to apply in the EB2 category.
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    All of you (including @bsnwnab) spend so much effort deconstructing everything I say and as well as all that's written on the internet and I wonder if any of you even bothered to check with an immigration lawyer.

    It's like me telling you the car's out of gas and you all keep saying that of course not, it's still a car since you can see the windshield wipers. Why not start the car yourself and see if it works? That's all I'm asking. Talk to a lawyer yourself. It won't take much more than a phone call or a visit and a few hundred dollars.

    In fact, I insist that you all to talk to 5 (since 3 isn't convincing enough for you) different immigration lawyers. It must be hard accepting the things I just wrote what with all the money and time you've spent on pursuing your dreams but seriously, I insist that you consult with a lawyer. In the end you're going to need one anyway. Or are you planning on filing for your green card petition yourself?

    @juandelacruz: What's the name of our online NP school? And no, I don't have a master's degree and just because you got admitted into a master's program doesn't make you an expert in immigration law. Nursing grad school is way different from law school so I don't know how you made that correlation. So pardon me if I trust those three lawyers (people who passed the bar here in the US) more than I trust any of you. You don't interpret the law for living. They do so I'm trusting them more than I trust you. Sorry. It must be hard to accept one's own mistakes.

    @ghilbert: Upon receipt of your green card petition, they will investigate your timeline and paperworks. that includes your school, too.

    On a final note, I wish you all the best but seriously, consult with a lawyer. An immigration lawyer who is actively practicing here in the US and not a divorce lawyer nor a tax attorney nor an entertainment lawyer. Not a dentist and not a biochemist. And no, your neighborhood mechanic does not count. Some people (you know who you are) in this thread seem to jump to the farthest conclusions all because they got accepted into grad school.

    With every single post that you argue with me, you're only making things worst for yourself. For the __th time, there is no harm in talking to an immigration lawyer :-)
    Last edit by orangepink on Aug 30, '11
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    Quote from orangepink
    @juandelacruz: What's the name of our online NP school? And no, I don't have a master's degree and just because you got admitted into a master's program doesn't make you an expert in immigration law. Nursing grad school is way different from law school so I don't know how you made that correlation. So pardon me if I trust those three lawyers (people who passed the bar here in the US) more than I trust any of you. You don't interpret the law for living. They do so I'm trusting them more than I trust you. Sorry. It must be hard to accept one's own mistakes.
    If you understood my post, you'll know that I did not graduate from an online NP school. However, I know of people who did and are working as NP's right now because they are fully qualified and certified by a national certification board and by their state of jurisdiction. Gee, I wonder why the same standard wouldn't apply to a foreign national who goes through the same educational path and certification. You can believe your lawyers all you want. I'm sticking with my opinion though it really doesn't matter 'cause I don't need any help with immigration as I'm a US citizen.
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    As an F1 holder, I am not able to enroll in a fully online program here in the States. I tried to enroll at University of Illinois Chicago for the RN-BSN program but was denied because it was fully online with clinicals. There's just no way of having an F1 STATUS and going for an online degree. The adviser told me "If your going to do it online, then why should you be here in the States, you can go back to your country and get your degree?" Doing my FNP in class... hoping to get my EB2 after grad.
  9. 0
    Hi,

    MSN Educator and MSN Health Care Management, do they meet the requirements for EB2 sponsorship?

    Thank You
  10. 0
    A lot will depend on the job offer. MSN should meet requirements but the job has to meet requirements


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