degree vs diploma

  1. does the mandatory degree program deter people from entering the nursing program? wouldn't keeping the bridge out option available potentially produce more nurses? (one could always complete the degree through open schooling)
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    The degree program at the college near me is only 6 months longer than the bridge out was, so I don't see it as a big deal. If that deters anyone from becoming a nurse, then maybe that's not such a bad thing. Someone who really wants to become a nurse won't be deterred by 6 months. It also doesn't produce more nurses, just gets a few out more quickly. A friend of mine is an instructor and out of their 60 students, they haven't had more than 5 bridge out each year in the last few years.
  4. by   Joeknee
    It takes 12 more months to complete the degree program at my school.
  5. by   fergus51
    I still don't think that's bad. You never hear about other professions lowering the amount of formal education they need to get warm bodies out there.
  6. by   Mito
    Hello All,

    Finishing up my diploma I really can't see what all the fuss is about. The job offers keep rolling and I haven't even been asked yet if I am considering getting my degree. I realize that the degree has advantages and sets standards and all that but as far as getting a job it really does matter in my part of Ontario.

    Mito
  7. by   mother/babyRN
    Here is an old timer opinion that starts flames whenever it is voiced..However, I have a diploma and wouldn't change it, as it came from, at the time, the first place accredited nursing school in the nation. Back then it wasn't bad karma to get a diploma vs degree. I supported and support either decision. What I never dis and never will support is nursing's interest to get the profession better recognized for its skill and importance, by making things like seeking degrees, mandatory....Diploma programs were famous for better and more complete clinical programs. We were encouraged not to bother studying for our licenses, since, if we had to do that , we hadn't learned enough. No one in the years I was there, ever didn't pass the boards..I am not saying that always happened, and perhaps I may someday seek a degree...I think its great that people do. I do not feel, however, that it is fair to chastize those who prefer to keep their diploma rather than go on for a degree...I was grandfathered in, thank goodness. These days, in my opinion, much of the nursing shortage has to do with people seeking furthering education , or not feeling they are fairly compensated for the degrees they already have. Many of the degreed people seek or eventually end up in management or non patient nursing roles. While those are important, they do not lend themselves to patient care. Nursing created the shortage and I wish there wasn't such a rift between the idea of diploma or degree. For the training and experience, I would suggest diploma programs, those that continue to exist and are well credentialed, vs degree programs hands down, however, in this world, I would suggest to an interested would be nurse, that it would be a good idea to pursue a degree in order to survive the prejudices thrust upon diploma programs which are not lesser programs, but simply, different ones....
  8. by   fergus51
    Mother baby I understand that and it is a very American point of view. The main difference here is that it is becoming mandatory in a few provinces and that the degree has more clinical time than the diploma (not less as is sometimes or often the case in the US). The diploma and degree students here are in the same classes for the first 6 semesters or so, and the only difference is the degree students have another 2 semestres of classes and clinical.

    I should say I don't think having a diploma makes a lesser nurse. I just think having one standard educational route is a lot simpler.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Feb 12, '03
  9. by   JMP
    Originally posted by Mito
    Hello All,

    Finishing up my diploma I really can't see what all the fuss is about. The job offers keep rolling and I haven't even been asked yet if I am considering getting my degree. I realize that the degree has advantages and sets standards and all that but as far as getting a job it really does matter in my part of Ontario.

    Mito
    Well Mito, it depends on what you want to do with your career. As a RN with critical care experience, I can tell you that I am working on my degree NOW. IF YOU EVER want to leave the bedside, and NOT WORK shift ( and I do eventually) then diploma grads will be left out.

    Get experience, yes, a must. BUT start working on your degree. Job offers ....yes I would have a thousand as a critical care RN with experience BUT need a degree to move past the bedside.

    IF you want to work 15-20 years of shift at the bedside.......well I would still start a degree..... part of nursing is that you never stop learning.... and another thing...if you possibly can get into a teaching hospital....your eyes will be opened wide.

close