becoming a midwife?

  1. I am currently an RN, working in L&D in the US, I am interested in going to UK to work on a temporary assignment but it is my understanding that you must be a midwife to work in L&D? I also heard that the requirements to become a midwife in UK are different than US? Does anyone have any information about this?
    Is is possible for a hospital to train you? Any info would be greatly appreciated, thanks so much! SHelley
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   karenG
    hi

    well yes to work in labour and delivery you need to be a midwife (madwife!) over here pregnancy is seen as normal, not an illness and as such is not managed by the medical staff- unless its a complicated pregnancy. all antenatal care, delivery and postnatal care is delivered by the midwife who is responsible for her client. with luck, the woman doesnt go within 10 feet of a doctor! so think that is different to the states.

    the training is 2 yrs ( I think) and usually university/hospital based. you need to apply for training- you get a bursary but its not much. then you can work anywhere...........

    its ages since I did my midwifery training so I'm sure others will add more!!

    good luck

    Karen
  4. by   ayemmeff
    I think the training is now 18 months post grad (if you are already a UK qualified RN ) or 3 years if you are going in from scratch.The 18 month course seems to be becoming scarcer to find. Don't know why. Personally I'd rather have a midwife who is also an RN with a few years of life experience behind her,who knows her asthma from her diabetes,than a 20 year old who knows nothing but birthing babies.JMO.

    The Royal College of Midwives maybe helpful.Also Lisa (allnurses member for Scotland) is looking into it,(I think!)so she may have some more accurate information for you,when she reads this.

    Good Luck,look forward to meeting you!
  5. by   OBNurseShelley
    Ok, so what you're saying is, I would have to train for 3 years, in order to work in L&D in the UK?? they dont have any nurses at all?? who assists the midwives? We have midwives in the US as well, and it's 2 years full-time post-graduate training through a school of nurse midwifery, they usually require a minimum of 1 year acute-care experience, prefer L&D experience but will except others. Does the UK sponsor US nurses for this training? I'm really interested in coming to the UK to work/train.....any suggestions on whom to contact about this?? thanks so much, shelley!
  6. by   NurseShell
    (quietly pulls up a chair, opens notebook and begins to take notes)
  7. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by OBNurseShelley
    Ok, so what you're saying is, I would have to train for 3 years, in order to work in L&D in the UK??
    Shelley, it sounds to me like if the UK will recognize your already acquired liscense, then you could take the 18 month course. If you can find one, that is.

    Very interesting guys.

    Heather
  8. by   OBNurseShelley
    well that would be cool...i could handle that.....BUT, im wanting to be sponsored to go there....ya know...with housing and a job included.......wondering if there is any such thing...i know they have study abroad programs for undergrad...why not for post-grad?
  9. by   lisamct
    Hi, just wanted to pretty much confirm whats already been written. The 18 month course is stilll available but as ayemmeff said its quite uncommon now and you would have to be registered as a UK RN first. Some employers will fund you to do this short course however you usually have to gaurantee them a certain length of service after you qualify (usually 2 years I think) Otherwise you have to complete the 3 year course which would have to be funded by a bursary only, this is usually around 6000/annum (about $9000)
    I dont know of anywhere that employs nurses in pre/post natal units or L & D, I think it is always midwives. From what I know of the roles of US L&D nurses its not greatly different from our midwives role although I think we have much less 'medical' input in our uncomplicated births. The midwifery training in the UK is very specific to midwifery issues and is very different from our nurse training (I dont know if this is the best way or not as expectant mothers can have health issues as well)
    You might get some info from these sites:
    www.midwivesonline.com
    www.nmas.ac.uk
    www.nmc-uk.org
    Lisa
  10. by   ayemmeff
    I knew you'd do the biz,Lisa!!!
  11. by   lisamct
    No problem Midwifery is my ''pet subject'' at the moment as Im still trying to figure out how I can afford to live on 6000/annum for 3 years so I can go re-train. As an RNMH I dont get the choice of the 18 month course, personally I think they should just seccond (sp?) me to do it but I cant convince my manager that it would benefit our learning disability services!!
    Guess its back to saving for me...
    Lisa
    Last edit by lisamct on Mar 11, '03
  12. by   ayemmeff
    I'm the opposite,I need to do the 18 month course,but I would need to travel about 50 miles each way to do it,that's if I could get accepted on the yearly course!
    Every time applying crosses my mind though,I get pregnant!
  13. by   frannybee
    LOL @ Ayemmeff! I'm glad this thread has popped up - just today I have decided that I'm not going to apply for either of the E grade posts I had been asked to apply for, and will instead apply to do the 18mth B.Sc Midwifery at the uni attached to my hospital. I'm *really* excited about it and have been giddy all day. My Mum always said one way out of frustration is education, and this just may be my way out of a no-win situation at work.

    This is it.

    I'll let you all know what happens tomorrow regarding the foreign student thing. I'm allowed to be here if I stay in my current job but as I'm an Aussie national, I may very well have to go through the same rigmarole as anyone else from overseas.

    Watch this space!
  14. by   frannybee
    Originally posted by lisamct
    No problem Midwifery is my ''pet subject'' at the moment as Im still trying to figure out how I can afford to live on 6000/annum for 3 years so I can go re-train. As an RNMH I dont get the choice of the 18 month course, personally I think they should just seccond (sp?) me to do it but I cant convince my manager that it would benefit our learning disability services!!
    Guess its back to saving for me...
    Lisa
    Lisa, that's a crying shame. The Welsh Assembly pay for the course here, and you get to stay at your current pay point unless you're new to the NHS in which case you start at a D grade rate.

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