Are you angry about the NMC OSCE??? - page 13

I wonder if there is anyone out there who, like me, who has been slogging through the NMC application process and has taken or will take the OSCE? Are any of you ANGRY about the OSCE? I am. ... Read More

  1. by   Jhurlow
    I am now learning that UK NMC processes are a bit of a scam. I tested at Northampton. A UK trained nurse who took the exam with me told me that the preparation documents on the NILE website are catagorically inadequate to pass the OSCE exam they are presented by the Northamption OSCE as preparation for. This nurse told me that actual practice is require to pass this exam; which, if you look at the research on OSCE examinations, is the only way that this type of exam has been show to be valid....think about that. The NMC is taking our money for a testing strategy which they use inappropriately to judge our nursing competency. This UK nurse told me that the only way to feel somewhat confident about passing this NMC OSCE exam to first take on UK nursing employment as an International/Return to work Band 3 nurse. This role, which I believe is similar to being a nursing assistant in the US, will then give an Internationally trained RN access to a Trust's training facilities. There is NOTHING about this in the NMC guidance for Non EU trained candidates!
    I'm not sure about the legality of NMC processes in the UK but this level of misrepresentation would be considered a very questionable practice in the US. The Professional Standards Authority apparently has some ability to comment and report to parliament about NMC practices. We all may be able to help future nursing candidates as well as UK citizens if all on this list serve consider contacting the Professional Standards Authority to share their experiences and express their concerns. At the very least, no harm can be done.
    I've communicated with David Martin at david.martin@professionalstandards.org.uk.
  2. by   Nursegal0501
    Quote from Jhurlow
    Did you have any luck with your appeal. I've complained to the NMC, the UK Department of Health, and to the Professional Standards Authority (they apparently have some NMC oversight) yet receiving responses no more valuable than double talk. Have you seen a lawyer? I am happy to join you and perhaps others in such a venture. There is power in numbers. This abuse of power and the human suffering it is causing in this country needs to be discussed with someone who cares and can take action.

    No, they said I can only appeal the process and not the actual results of my exam. This is their standard answer.
  3. by   Nursegal0501
    Quote from Jhurlow
    I am now learning that UK NMC processes are a bit of a scam. I tested at Northampton. A UK trained nurse who took the exam with me told me that the preparation documents on the NILE website are catagorically inadequate to pass the OSCE exam they are presented by the Northamption OSCE as preparation for. This nurse told me that actual practice is require to pass this exam; which, if you look at the research on OSCE examinations, is the only way that this type of exam has been show to be valid....think about that. The NMC is taking our money for a testing strategy which they use inappropriately to judge our nursing competency. This UK nurse told me that the only way to feel somewhat confident about passing this NMC OSCE exam to first take on UK nursing employment as an International/Return to work Band 3 nurse. This role, which I believe is similar to being a nursing assistant in the US, will then give an Internationally trained RN access to a Trust's training facilities. There is NOTHING about this in the NMC guidance for Non EU trained candidates!
    I'm not sure about the legality of NMC processes in the UK but this level of misrepresentation would be considered a very questionable practice in the US. The Professional Standards Authority apparently has some ability to comment and report to parliament about NMC practices. We all may be able to help future nursing candidates as well as UK citizens if all on this list serve consider contacting the Professional Standards Authority to share their experiences and express their concerns. At the very least, no harm can be done.
    I've communicated with David Martin at david.martin@professionalstandards.org.uk.

    I definitely agree with you about the misrepresentation of the information given to international nurses. It's like we are being set up to fail on purpose. Candidates definitely need three months of work experience prior to taking the OSCE. It was very helpful to me once I started working as band 4 in the hospital and doing the skills that I would be tested on while also going through the training program for the OSCE with my clinical educator. This is not written on the NMC site or the University of Northampton and I personally don't think this is ethical. I feel like there is SOMETHING someone should do about this. I don't feel this way simply because I didn't pass. I feel this way because it is wrong to make people believe one thing and then present them with something different.
  4. by   Andrei15
    I can finally bid adieu to OSCE for Overseas nurses. I took it the third time and was able to pass it despite being on the verge of being sent home.
  5. by   Akzobelle
    Quote from Andrei15
    I can finally bid adieu to OSCE for Overseas nurses. I took it the third time and was able to pass it despite being on the verge of being sent home.
    Congratulations!
  6. by   sunlightangel
    I also agree we have to speak up about the nmc osce exam. its a ridiculous exam that has no head and tail or proper format to it. i think we should all communicate with colleagues back home from our various countries to stay away from the UK nmc licensing programme for now. Honestly speaking its not worth all the trouble.
  7. by   jnurse816
    Hello, I looked at the website for the organization David Martin is affiliated with. It appears that the organization can really only listen to this issue with he OSCE because they have no power in regards to the registrars, like the NMC.

    I do have one question. I am going through Continental Travel Nursing. They say that they have a specialist who helps you go over everything you need to know when taking this test. Has anyone had experience with this? I am taking the CBT tomorrow. Does anyone have any advice on that? How is it compared to the NCLEX? The material provided is so hard to follow. I am having a really hard time figuring out what I need to know, and what is less important.
  8. by   The_nerve
    I'm looking at going through continental as well. How has your experience been? Did you pass?
  9. by   jnurse816
    Quote from The_nerve
    I'm looking at going through continental as well. How has your experience been? Did you pass?
    Quote from michaelg510
    Does this work for American nurses to go abroad as well?
    I like continental. I heard horror stories but I think that was from a while back. I think over time they fixed their flaws. They are helping a whole lot.

    Written below is what I just wrote for another thread I was apart of. It's so long so I'm just copying and pasting it here lol


    Background info on me, I'm a US nurse with two years experience. I first took the IELTS ($300). After passing that I was given authorization to the CBT ($180 USD. theory exam of 120 questions based of nursing in the U.K. And their rules and regulations which are found in the "code" and "blue print" provided by the NMC). The study tools given for this test were unorganized and hard to follow. The "E" in the blueprint means it's is essential and means that if there is a question about this topic, it must be passed. The "y" in the blue print means, yes it will be on the exam" the blue print and code will be for the CBT and OSCE exam.

    After taking the CBT, the NMC sent me an email saying that I can now finish with my application for my license (about $200 USD) filling out this application is entirely tricky. I am doing all of this through continental nurse travel agency.

    I have heard old horror stories about this company but I have had a great experience so far. My nurse recruited is named ******** and she sincerely cares about how I am doing. Besides having a recruiter, they have a person who's specific role is to help you through the application it's self (seriously was just on the phone with him for an hour and half and wrote three pages worth of notes. The application is no joke). I was advised to not start it until he called me and game me direction. After the application is done, the agency will work on my visa (they are going to be my sponsor). It is going to take 2-4 weeks for the NMC to put together my file, it will take another 4-10 weeks to give me the okay to take the OSCE.

    The OSCE is the second part of the exam process. This is the clinical portion. It will be at north Hampton university. There is not much information to study from for this test (there is nothing that I have found that shows me how it is set up or what machines or supplies I will be using). The specialized guy who helped me with the application is the same person who will go over everything thing you need to know to study for the OSCE (1.5-2 hour phone convo)and will also set you up with an education day once you arrive in England for the OSCE (it's through an outside company that you pay for and will be 240 British pounds) doing the education day is optional but I'm going to do it because I heard they fail you for petty things and I want to be familiar with the objects I will be working with as Europe nursing is still foreign to me. Before taking the OSCE, you can get study help from the university website but that's only after the NMC says you can take the test.

    A good book to study from is the Royal marsden student 9th edition. I had the seventh and it was way out of date. I heard the 8edition was no good.
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Apr 25 : Reason: name removed
  10. by   The_nerve
    I just can't get over those exam prices. Especially knowing they fail you for silly things so most people have to retake. It really makes me hesitate.
  11. by   Ukrn2017
    Hi guys! I failed my first attempt. I had a full resit. I seriously think they've become nicer and more considerate now. My second attempt was so smooth! They were very warm and jolly and nice! Which did not happen on my first Lol
  12. by   jnurse816
    Quote from Ukrn2017
    Hi guys! I failed my first attempt. I had a full resit. I seriously think they've become nicer and more considerate now. My second attempt was so smooth! They were very warm and jolly and nice! Which did not happen on my first ������Lol
    Can I ask, what did they fail you for and how long after you failed, did you retake the test? Did they fail you over something silly? Was it the same people who proctored your test the first time?
  13. by   Avid reader
    Quote from WrigleyRN
    Hi there - thank you for the reply. I respect your experience and your perspective on this. I know you have seen a lot in your time as an IEN.

    However, I completely disagree with you. I, and all of us, do have the right to speak our minds if we feel we are trapped in an unjust system.

    The fact that other countries like Canada may have more extensive and expensive vetting requirements doesn't justify the NMC's requirements. It only shows that perhaps Canada is the most out of touch with reality, and needs the biggest overhaul of all.

    I understand a governing body like the NMC wanting to safeguard the public, and it is their duty to do so. However, it is also their duty to ensure their licensure requirements are valid and fair... Neither of which the OSCE is.

    As far as validity is concerned (and this is an important factor for a nursing organization whose bottom line is evidence-based practice), where is the literature that points to this test being an accurate (or even barely sufficient) determiner of competence? I would implore them to publish any literature they have used in the creation of this exam that shows it tests what it is supposed to test: a nurse's competence or lack thereof.

    In my case, because I didn't vocalize one line in my skill station, though it was obvious I had done the skill according to guidelines, they failed me. After all my years of applying, my years of practical nursing experience in acute care, my education, the theory test, the passing of all the patient journey aspects of the OSCE.... They will fail me and judge me to be incompetent based on the fact I didn't vocalize one line??? This is unfair, illogical, and insulting.

    Mind you, they have informed me I can resit the skills stations. This means they are generously allowing me to fly across the world, pay the excessive fee, pay for accommodation, take PTO from work... And try again to carry out these skills that could potentially be memorized and mimicked by anyone.

    I will not be participating in a resit. I have more self-respect than that, and honestly, don't desire to work in a country where well-qualified, experienced nurses are "welcomed" in this way.

    I am in a unique position to voice my opinion because I don't actually need to work in the UK. I just thought it would be a cool experience... unlike some of the other nurses taking the OSCE who must work in the UK due to a spouse living there, or whatever reason. I feel empowered because I, for one, am not beholden to the NMC. Thus, I feel I can and should speak up on behalf of everyone that feels intimidated by the NMC and doesn't want to rock the boat and potentially become a target for dismissal.

    I know there is already a movement of nurses who are trying to have the NMC do away completely with the OSCE. This is not a new idea. I just didn't know to what degree it had been voiced in an online forum yet. And I wanted to plant the seed here in the minds of competent nurses from around the world that... Things could change if we speak our minds. In the years to come, the NMC can and should grant licensure to qualified RNs without subjecting them to an invalid, redundant, meaningless OSCE.
    Totally agree with you. I was trained in the UK both Psych and General and to re-register it was a fuss. However, I worked with one Hungarian nurse who was a sister who barely spoke English and her charting was atrocious. She was a brilliant brown noser however. Wish you luck m8.

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