Are there LPNs in UK?

  1. Just curious, thanks.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Tanvi Tusti
    Quote from Fancy Face
    Just curious, thanks.
    No, we dont have LPN's as such. I guess the nearest we have would be a nursing assistant or healthcare assistant. They assist in basic patient care as directed and supervised by an RN or RM but dont require any formal qualification, most of their training is in-house
    Last edit by Tanvi Tusti on Dec 11, '06
  4. by   suzanne4
    They used to have the Enrolled Nurse, which would be the same as the LPN, or the closest equivalent, but they have been phased out.
  5. by   Silverdragon102
    as said previously nearest is enrolled nurse and no longer trained infact healthcare workers now trained who be something closer but not a recognised qualification ie at present does not come under NMC. For immigration purposes you have to be RN and now things are harder if trained outside UK/EU
  6. by   Clarecartwright
    Yeah we now have in our trust Higher clinical support workers (B grades) who are trained in Venapuncture, cannulation, female Caths, wound dressings, BM's and ECGs etc - Im sure Ill soon be out of a job LOL
  7. by   XB9S
    Quote from Clarecartwright
    Yeah we now have in our trust Higher clinical support workers (B grades) who are trained in Venapuncture, cannulation, female Caths, wound dressings, BM's and ECGs etc - Im sure Ill soon be out of a job LOL

    Claire, I am curious, do your B grades flush the cannula after insertion and if so how do they fare as they are giving a prescription only medicine and are not qualified therefore legally allowed to do so. I only ask because this is an issue that has arrisen in my trust and we still have no firm answer
  8. by   Clarecartwright
    This is also tha same for us too - they are still insure wether they are allowed to or not so for now we are flushing them - it is not very often they cannulate though - the trust is deciding at the moment wether to take this job from them for the reasons you mentioned

    NMC is also supposedly in process to putting Higher clinical support workers in so that they will in fact have their own number and code of conduct etc
  9. by   RGN1
    Quote from Clarecartwright
    Yeah we now have in our trust Higher clinical support workers (B grades) who are trained in Venapuncture, cannulation, female Caths, wound dressings, BM's and ECGs etc - Im sure Ill soon be out of a job LOL
    I can see that this is the ultimate NHS money saving plan - a whole ward staffed by "B" grades - paid pants - overseen by one RN per shift!! (Also paid pants but just a few more than the "B" grade)

    Great vision huh?! & where will the buck stop when disaster happens? - With that poor RN, of course!!

    The really sad thing is that I wish I was joking!

    BTW, does anyone miss the EN's?? I do!
  10. by   Silverdragon102
    I used to be a EN and do miss them. It is alright training HCA's but EN's gave better support to the RN and at times could take charge
  11. by   RGN1
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    I used to be a EN and do miss them. It is alright training HCA's but EN's gave better support to the RN and at times could take charge
    :yeahthat:Here, here!

    I think it was also a good route to the RGN for those who may have started off technically lower down the academic field, maybe due to having gone to a crappy school, but proved very good at their job & could then go on to do the conversion course. Many of the ward managers & matrons that I have met started out their career as an EN!

    What's scary though is that I've read that in some US hospitals they are phasing out LPN's & that would be just as much a disaster for exactly the same reasons as I think doing away with EN's has been here.

    Hehehe, & while I'm at moaning about the loss of the "good old days" I wish they'd never done away with hospital based training, period!!

    Did you used to wear green? I remember all the EN's I worked with had green on their uniforms somewhere - either on the lapels, in the stripe, or the trousers (when we went to tunics).

    Ah..... the good old days of bed pan rounds, back rubs & races down each side of the ward to see who made their beds up first!
  12. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from RGN1
    :yeahthat:Here, here!

    I think it was also a good route to the RGN for those who may have started off technically lower down the academic field, maybe due to having gone to a crappy school, but proved very good at their job & could then go on to do the conversion course. Many of the ward managers & matrons that I have met started out their career as an EN!

    What's scary though is that I've read that in some US hospitals they are phasing out LPN's & that would be just as much a disaster for exactly the same reasons as I think doing away with EN's has been here.

    Hehehe, & while I'm at moaning about the loss of the "good old days" I wish they'd never done away with hospital based training, period!!

    Did you used to wear green? I remember all the EN's I worked with had green on their uniforms somewhere - either on the lapels, in the stripe, or the trousers (when we went to tunics).

    Ah..... the good old days of bed pan rounds, back rubs & races down each side of the ward to see who made their beds up first!
    Yep wore a green strip on cap and green and white stripped dress. Did convertion course and the rest is history as they say
  13. by   RGN1
    Ah, I'm getting all sentimental now!!

    I miss my green colleagues - although most of them are now in blue, of course! Which is great for them but I think of all those great nurses we may be missing out on now etc.
  14. by   Fiona59
    Oh, guys. LPNs in my province were finally shown the bridge to becoming an RN. We had naively thought it would involve perhaps a year of additional education in areas like management and the skills we don't have.

    But no, they managed to delay it long enough so that we now have to meet BScN requirement for RN. Which involves an 8 month bridging course (for professional practice) and are accepted into the second year of the four year programme, IF the PN has completed first year studies in English, Psychology, and Sociology. Many of my co-workers figure it's not worth it due to our ages.

    But for what it's worth, we miss the hospital based training methods. We as a group (LPN and RN) are tired of being looked down on the new University graduates who come to our units wanting us to hold their hands for their first six months to learn their skills. Four year university students spend so few hours on a unit that it's a joke. Maybe 150 hours over four months.

    I think academia is to blame for this and those who were desparate and needy to be recognized as "professionals".

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