applying reciprocityin canada

  1. 0
    GOOd day!:spin:


    i became an RN in the philippines after passing the board exams last june 2008.


    i am confused about what one staff nurse told me. She graduated year 2004. She has a visa screen, passed CGFNS, NCLEX, IELTS, but she complains about the long wait visa for the US so she opts to go to canada instead. she told me if you passed the NCLEX, you are not required anymore to get a refresher course or have schooling in canada for 6 months. how true is this? does this depend on what state you applied in the USA? or does it depend on the province you would like to transfer in canada? please enlighten me.


    if this is true, i would do the same. i also plan to to go to canada. thank you!
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  3. 16 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    What nonsense!
    Canada and the USA are 2 very different countries with very different healthsystems, if you have passed NCLEX doesn't interest at all, sorry. You will have to apply at the College of Nursing or Association in the Province where you want to work, they will assess you indiviually and then make their decision.

    5cats
    Fiona59, janfrn, Silverdragon102, and 1 other like this.
  5. 1
    I have also moved this thread to the International Forum since it is dealing with licensure questions.

    And as mentioned above, there is no such thing as reciprocity for Canada. One needs to apply there and be accepted and then take and pass their licensing exam called the CRNE.

    There is no such thing to what you have posted, and it is also specific to a program that they had in Alberta, but one was also placed in the role of the LPN, and not that of the RN as well. And this program is no longer available since there were so many issues with it.

    Things also have to do with if one has actual experience or not as well. This plays a part on what Canada will require. If one graduated several years ago and is working as a "staff nurse" then they have experience behind them to count as well.

    Reciprocity means that one is automatically accepted and that their credentials are automatically accepted.
    And this cannot be further from the truth.

    Please take the time to do some reading on this site, there is much information that you need to be aware of.

    ----------------
    Next consideration that you need to be aware of is the fact that Canada does not have unlimited visas available as a start and their economy is also having issues, just like the US. Someone with experience is always going to take a lead step over someone without any.

    Best of luck to you.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  6. 4
    Quote from suzanne4
    There is no such thing to what you have posted, and it is also specific to a program that they had in Alberta, but one was also placed in the role of the LPN, and not that of the RN as well. And this program is no longer available since there were so many issues with it.
    Actually it was never a "program". It was more of an exercise in damage control because the health regions had recruited people, brought them over to Alberta at great expense and THEN started assessing their suitability for the job. They found that the education these nurses had received was not equivalent to the BScN that Alberta nurses receive but only that of our LPN education. The people were already here and a lot of time, effort and money had already been spent on the recruitment, so the health regions had to go to Plan B, which they made up as they went along. The group of nurses affected by this boo-boo wrote their LPN licensure exam in January and the results should be out any day now. I have it on good authority that several of them did not even make it to the exam phase due to clinical competency issues and have already returned to the Philippines, and at least one or two have found a back door into the US, which was their primary goal in the first place. Rumour has it that, pass or fail, the remaining candidates will be licensed. This has set off alarm bells everywhere, but without whistle-blower protection in this province, the public will never know.
    Ginger's Mom, Fiona59, suzanne4, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    And since there are no legal back door entries into the US and no visas available; wonder how they are surviving here.

    Unfotunately, more than likely it is going to be working illegal since they never had the required experience as an RN to be considered a specialist.

    Scary indeed.
  8. 0
    Hi, I really underdstand that NCLEX (USA) and CRNE (CANADA) are both different things. I guess why most of us foreign educated nurses think that there's a reciprocity between these two regulatory board is the countries (USA-CANADA) close ties. But I know though USA and CANADA are pretty much close to each other, interms of trade, land procimity, financial and busniess apects, etc. the nursing regulatory board for each country are not run by the government. These are self governing. So it's the same, that if your licensed here it doesn't mean that you can work as a nurse in US. You still have to take the NCLEX.

    I have a question, In the US, they have reciprocity within their state. What I mean to say is that, if you are licensed in New York you could apply for reciprocity and could work in California, am I right?
    Does canada have this too? I mean, what if you are licensed in the province of BC, can you apply for reciprocity and work in Ontario or Alberta?

    Thank you. Please correct me if I am wrong, I would appreciate it.
  9. 1
    Quote from suzanne4
    And since there are no legal back door entries into the US and no visas available; wonder how they are surviving here.

    Unfotunately, more than likely it is going to be working illegal since they never had the required experience as an RN to be considered a specialist.

    Scary indeed.
    This guy apparently has been petitioned by a family member (who allegedly runs a day home of some sort) under the family unification thing. Of course if this guy is working it'll be as an illegal.

    Quote from janelf
    I have a question, In the US, they have reciprocity within their state. What I mean to say is that, if you are licensed in New York you could apply for reciprocity and could work in California, am I right?
    Does canada have this too? I mean, what if you are licensed in the province of BC, can you apply for reciprocity and work in Ontario or Alberta?
    Yes, it's possible but it's not automatic. You still have to meet the new province's eligibility requirements. Most provinces are now requiring a degree for entry to practice and there are some regional differences in education. So when a nurse in Nova Scotia, for example, wants to move to BC, CRNBC will want school transcripts, registration verification, a criminal records check, and so on, even if the applicant has been a Canadian citizen their whole lives. Applications are assessed individually and any conditions that might be determined by the receiving province have to be satisfied before the registration is complete.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  10. 0
    thank's janfrn.
    By the way, I know some people who went to Alberta and saskatchewan with that type of processing. They went there as graduate nurses, but they were issued working permits, and are waiting to take the exam for LPN. I am not sure if they already took it. And for those who already passed the NCLEX they don't have to take the LPN exam anymore. So they are just waiting to sit for the CRNE. I have no questions about that but it does look to me that NCLEX is only at LPN level in Canada. Since people who did passed the nclex doesn't have to take the lpn exam anymore? Any people here who knows something about this?
    Actually it really varies from province to province.
    So, are these exercises that they have in the said provinces still present? Thank's.
  11. 0
    There seem to be a big confusion around. NCLEX has NOTHING to do with Canada, it's the US state exam for Nurses. It doesn't matter if you passed NCLEX as an IEN. It's like if you pass the Mexican state exam, it's another north american country.
    What counts is your education whereever you received it, your home nursing exam and registration plus maybe work experience (in case your education is lacking for instance).
    Again Canada and USA are 2 different countries, they happen to be neighbors and they have certain agreements. Like Mexico and the States.

    5cats
  12. 0
    JANELF:

    To put it bluntly, the nurses who were permitted to work as LPNs needed a lot of handholding and skill development to get them up to the requirements of an LPN in the province of Alberta. Many nurses are very unimpressed at the quality of nursing education that a BScN in the Phillipines are obtaining. If they can't work at the level of a local new grad PN, they really shouldn't be given more opportunities than locally educated people.

    They will only be able to write the CRNE if and when they complete the required education upgrades because their BScN from the Phillipines was assessed to be the equivalent of the college diploma issued in Alberta.


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