Anyone ever lived and/or worked as an RN in Ecuador?

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    I'll try this again - I asked about a month ago about living in Mexico (and of course, the overwhelming response was how dangerous Mexico is).

    We've since done more research and have revised our plans (not because of the putative dangerousness of Mexico, but because Ecuador suits our plans better). Husband and I plan to relocate to Ecuador in 8-10 years, after two older children graduate from high school. Our plan is such that we will take a (very) early retirement, but I would like the option of continuing to work part-time as an advanced practice nurse (midwife).

    Does anyone have any experience or knowledge about American nurses working in Ecuador?
    Jarnaes likes this.
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  3. 19 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Id be carful about Ecuador as I have heard of drug seizures/smuggling in the area and unless you know the street smarts of the locals you could be in for a rough go of it. Have you lived in the area prior to deciding to get a job there? I always tell my friends to vacation in a new country before they move there to get an idea of any language/cultural/safety issues you may not expect. I heard parts of south america are very beuaitful though!
    Otessa likes this.
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    See, danger no matter where you go.
    awsmfun and Otessa like this.
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    Oh, for goodness sake. Or I could just stay in the good ole' US of A and find crime and drugs!

    FWIW, this city in Ecuador has been named one of the "best places to retire" by US News and World Reports for about 5 years in a row. So no, it's not riddled with drug crime. It has a large American/British ex-pat community. Yes, we plan on visiting several times over the next 8 years before we move for good.

    So I really don't need a bunch of cautionary tales about how dangerous it is, although I appreciate people's good intentions. I would really just like to talk to someone who may have worked there as an RN.
    Jarnaes likes this.
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    Quote from klone
    Oh, for goodness sake. Or I could just stay in the good ole' US of A and find crime and drugs!

    FWIW, this city in Ecuador has been named one of the "best places to retire" by US News and World Reports for about 5 years in a row. So no, it's not riddled with drug crime. It has a large American/British ex-pat community. Yes, we plan on visiting several times over the next 8 years before we move for good.

    So I really don't need a bunch of cautionary tales about how dangerous it is, although I appreciate people's good intentions. I would really just like to talk to someone who may have worked there as an RN.
    If it's the best place to retire, questioning the need for midwife or would you work in a different role in Ecuador?
    April, RN likes this.
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    I will already be a midwife for several years by the time we move there. I would like to have the option to continue working on a part-time basis, if I wish (we won't *need* to, financially, but would like to continue for my own edification).
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    I think I'm thinking the same thing Otessa is. I don't know anything about Ecuador but if this city is one of the best places to retire, I would think the average age would be 60+ and not childbearing age. It raises the question of whether or not a midwife would be needed in the area.

    That aside, I admire your adventurousness!
  10. 0
    Quote from April, RN
    I think I'm thinking the same thing Otessa is. I don't know anything about Ecuador but if this city is one of the best places to retire, I would think the average age would be 60+ and not childbearing age. It raises the question of whether or not a midwife would be needed in the area.

    That aside, I admire your adventurousness!
    Ah, gotcha. I misunderstood the question.

    Only a small percentage of the population is retirees. There is still a whole city full of native Ecuadorans, many of whom are having babies!
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    No doubt that current conditions in Ecuador have no bearing whatsoever on conditions in 8-10 years.

    Not quite sure why you're asking for information in this forum at this time, particularly since you're arguing with each answer that you receive and placing conditions upon your advice, as in:

    "So I really don't need a bunch of cautionary tales about how dangerous it is"

    Truly, what advice are you looking for?
    Last edit by roser13 on Dec 16, '10
    Otessa and caliotter3 like this.
  12. 1
    In case you missed it in my OP (oh, and in the TITLE of my post):

    Quote from klone
    Does anyone have any experience or knowledge about American nurses working in Ecuador?
    I was wondering if there were any nurses here who had worked in Ecuador. Nothing more, nothing less, not sure how to make it any more clear than that.
    Last edit by klone on Dec 16, '10
    Jarnaes likes this.


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