Why does a hospital need RNs which are unable to do anything else but starting IV's?? - page 6

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  1. by   IamRN
    Quote from canoehead
    Also no use for respiratory techs, nurses are qualified to do the same things, minus vents, and we have a holistic view of the patient and can prioritize based on that- plus we are used to working together. Where I work the RT's are trying to get nurses to take over their duties for the night shift- including vents. If we are good enough when they don't want to be woken up why not transfer their budget to us and let us cover the whole day.
    Careful what you ask for! The RT work may be coming our way sooner than we think, w/o the extra compensation of their budget influx!
  2. by   nadia562002
    My hospital recently decided to have a back-up IV nurse in place for when the bedside nurse was unsuccessful. I believe it is a dis-service to the nurse to not be allowed to place an IV because a IV team is there to do it. A good nurse should have this skill and at the least be proficient at it.
  3. by   jnette
    Quote from stevierae

    When I learned to start IVs, I was a Vietnam era corpsman, and even when I went to nursing school in the early '80s, starting IVs was considered basic patient care. It is an incredibly easy skill to learn, and one does not have to do it every single day to remain proficient. In fact, I take travel assignments these days, often one every two years--but it's not like one gets "rusty" or can't get right back into the swing of things after starting 2 or 3.

    I think IV teams are really great to have for PICC insertions--
    --but I think that simple peripheral IV access should be considered a basic nursing skill.
    Couldn't agree more. I, too learned IVs as a corpsman (same era)... and have always just assumed that it was considered a basic nursing skill. Have been quite shocked over the past few years to read that this is no longer so? I can't imagine being a nurse and never starting (or wanting to start) IVs... just can't imagine that. Truly.
  4. by   nurseunderwater
    oh cr*p

    nevermind.
    Last edit by nurseunderwater on Sep 6, '04
  5. by   RN-PA
    Quote from jnette
    Couldn't agree more. I, too learned IVs as a corpsman (same era)... and have always just assumed that it was considered a basic nursing skill. Have been quite shocked over the past few years to read that this is no longer so? I can't imagine being a nurse and never starting (or wanting to start) IVs... just can't imagine that. Truly.
    I know you worked on a med-surg floor for a while, jnette, so you have some idea of the numerous tasks and burdens already placed on med-surg nurses, and as I said in my previous post above:
    Quote from RN-PA
    That's a great concept in an ideal nursing world, but with nurse-to-patient ratios on med-surg of 1:6-7, PLUS higher acuity patients, PLUS covering LPNs' patients, PLUS computer documentation, PLUS many nurses working part-time, becoming proficient at IV starts can be unrealistic for many of us.

    As I posted much earlier in this thread, I am THANKFUL that we have an IV team at our hospital. At the previous hospital where I worked med-surg, we had to try two IV sticks before asking for help. With more and more patients who are elderly, or chemo patients with poor veins, or mastectomy patients with only one useable arm, if I missed my two attempts, I just lost two potential sites and caused the patient pain from my sticks twice. Because of working part-time, I might only have had to restart an IV twice a month. How was I ever to become proficient that way? The EXPERTS-- the IV nurses-- are better for the patients, and help us to do OUR jobs better.
    I would LOVE to have the time and proficiency that comes from starting numerous IV's, but it's not possible OR realistic with the ratios, acuity, working part-time, and other demands placed upon us.
  6. by   mattsmom81
    I've always started IV's but have run into quite a few nurses who came from big hospitals with IV teams where they were not given the opportunity to learn. Many never had the chance to start one in school either, except on that rubber arm...LOL!

    Funny how everything has a specialty these days, eh? I sure wouldn't mind starting IVs all day ...(on beds that raise up) ...to get away from the lifting.

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Why does a hospital need RNs which are unable to do anything else but starting IV's??