Mask for changing bag of IV fluid?

  1. 0
    So we have a new policy. We now have to wear gloves whenever we go near the IV lines, for anything, and we have to wear a mask during cap changes and whenever we hang a new bag of fluid.

    Is there ANY evidence to actually back this up?
  2. 2 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    Well, in many cases, one would have their mask on after a sterile central line dressing change, and then the caps are changed next, so yes, I can see that, but for a prn time of cap change. I know of no evidence that anything but gloved hands are needed. Your goal when changing the cap is to protect yourself from any blood which may be around the opening of the catheter and to keep the sterile male-female ends from touching anything but each other.
    For bag changing, unless you are switching out bags of chemotherapy meds, again, masking is overkill, and again, as long as the spike isn't touching anything but the inside of the IV bag, you are good to go.
    The only time I would concede is when you are working and you have a URI.. I'd mask in a minute, or if I'm have an allergy issue, and sneezing has gone haywire.

    Studies show that most of the CRBSI's (catheter related blood stream infections) that occur after a week of dwell can be directly correlated to inappropriate, or lack of hub cleaning and proper maintenance. Not doing a good, vigorous scrub with one's cleaning agent before entering the catheter, causes bacteria to enter the vascular system.. Then, Biofilm develops inside the lumen and in time, shears off and CRBSI's occur.
    Does your organization have reputable studies that they are pointing to for their beliefs, or has some educator "decided" to enact his or her own ideas without evidence?
    If they have evidence, I'd like to see it.
    ~*Stargazer*~ likes this.
  4. 1
    From what I hear, it was an educator. I'm going to put in a request to see the evidence. I'll share if I actually get any.
    sdeal likes this.


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