Mandated IV Certification for RN - page 2

The hospital that I work for has mandated that all RNs be IV Certified. What's your take on this? :confused: Your thoughts are greatly appreciated :idea:... Read More

  1. by   Anniekins
    Where I work, and as far as I know this is true for the area, and what I was taught in school, is that only LPN's need to be IV certified. RN's do not.

    At my nursing school, they don't even teach us how to start an IV. They say it is a skill that any joe off the street can be taught. They more want us to understand the general concepts involved with the technique, medicaitons, fluids..etc.
    Some students who do their practicum in ER get a lot of practice with them.
  2. by   Erin RN
    In order to sit for the CRNI test you must be an RN and have had 1600 hours of IV experience....I previously worked as a home IV infusion nurse and had planned to sit as soon as I was eligible but ended up moving to greener pastures. Several of the other Infusion case managers I worked with did become certified and said that the test is incredibly hard, much harder than the NCLEX ..it covers ALL infusion lines not just PIVs and also asks about various fluids etc etc. Just thought I would help clear up the confusion ..no one graduates from nursing school with the ability to put RN, CRNI after their name.. Erin
  3. by   smk1
    I'm not responding as a nurse (not one) just as a patient. I am a hard "stick" and when i was in labor it took 4 different people and 7 different tries in more than one location to get a line in. I think IV certification is a great idea because when the IV team is busy (as was the one in the hospital i was admitted to) then you may have more of a chance of your nurse (or at least someone on the floor) who could get it done. It took a really long time to get my IV in and I know the nurse who was assigned to me was not used to starting IV's because they have that IV team. The IV team was swamped and the doc wanted the line in asap and 3 different nurses tried and couldn't get a line in. I'm sure they were just rusty and I have difficult to find veins, but my poor arm was sure sore after all the needle sticks! A refresher IV course couldn't hurt.
  4. by   TinyNurse
    oh geeze, i thought as an RN we are certified in IVs......... I'm in Ohio.
  5. by   Anniekins
    Quote from TinyNurse
    oh geeze, i thought as an RN we are certified in IVs......... I'm in Ohio.
    You are right I am in Ohio as well, and there is no "formal" certification needed for RN's. LPN's do need to be IV certified.
  6. by   Erin RN
    I think there is some confusion. I am assuming that the OP means that her hospital is mandating that the RNs get the CRNI national certification. All RNs are able to start IVs and care for them, it is in our scope of practice. The CRNI is like having a CCRN a CEN or a CCM..it is nationally recognized. Every place I have worked the LPNs did have to take an IV class much like the training RNs get in school before they could do IVs. All RNs can do the IVs..kind of like working ICU or ER without being a CCRN or a CEN. I know the hospital I worked at requiredd that the entire IV team have their CRNI and the home infusion company I worked for encouraged it..just shows you have had additonal training and a higher level of expertise in that area..I too, certified to do IVs in school but I don't have the CRNI..most that do will sign it after their RN. Erin
  7. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from TinyNurse
    oh geeze, i thought as an RN we are certified in IVs......... I'm in Ohio.
    Please read the previous posts.

    THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ABLE TO LEGALLY START IVS VS IV CERTIFICATION VS LPNS TAKING A IV COURSE TO WORK WITH IVS!!!!!!!!

    Any RN that has learned to start IVs can start IVs - it does NOT mean that you are IV certified.

    In some states, LPNs can take an IV class and be permitted to start IVs - it does NOT mean that you are IV certified.

    IV certification requires hours (1600, I believe) of IV hands on experience with patients, special classes and passing a very difficult and long national exam. It is also quite expensive and signifies that the individual is a professional specialist in IVs.

    There is a significant difference between these 3 things.

    One does not have to be Certified to start IVs.
  8. by   dknunges
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Please read the previous posts.

    THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ABLE TO LEGALLY START IVS VS IV CERTIFICATION VS LPNS TAKING A IV COURSE TO WORK WITH IVS!!!!!!!!

    Any RN that has learned to start IVs can start IVs - it does NOT mean that you are IV certified.

    In some states, LPNs can take an IV class and be permitted to start IVs - it does NOT mean that you are IV certified.

    IV certification requires hours (1600, I believe) of IV hands on experience with patients, special classes and passing a very difficult and long national exam. It is also quite expensive and signifies that the individual is a professional specialist in IVs.

    There is a significant difference between these 3 things.

    One does not have to be Certified to start IVs.
    This is a very confusing topic,but caroladybelle has it right.
    [list]
    Any RN can start IV's once they have learned the procedure. Kinda like See one, Do one, Teach one. This makes them IV qualified not certified.
    In most states LPN are limited to the scope of practice set forth by their State Board of Nursing. Once they meet those requirements they are qualified to start IV by their institution.
    IV Certification can be obtained by logging 1600 hrs of IV related clinical practice in the 3 yrs prior to setting for the exam. The exam covers 9 core areas which includes: Infection Control, Quality Assurance, Clinical Application, Pharmacology, PEDS, Fluids and ELectrolyes, Chemotherapy, Transfusion Therapy and Parentral Nutrition. It is the worst test I've ever taken. Certification is good for 3 years then you can recert by logging the 1600 hours and either attending national conferences to obtain recert units or re-taking the exam.yuk
    Hope this clears things up a little
    Donna RN, CRNI
    Last edit by dknunges on Jan 24, '05 : Reason: Clarification
  9. by   swater
    I am from Indiana and an LPN, most of the travel jobs I am looking into want me to I.V. certified. Does any one know who I would contact to enroll in a class in Indiana? Thanks, Sandy
  10. by   Mandolyn
    I agree. If you have the chance to take the certification course, you should. I also agree that the hospital demanding it should pay for it.
    I also thought that RN's automatically went through IV certification as part of their education. Is this dependant on area?
    Anyone doing IV therapy should have special training in the area, which would mean you are certified in the field.
    There is a lot of risks involved with performing IV therapy. It is not to be taken lightly. If someone can draw blood with a butterfly it doesn't make them able to insert a catheter. A catheter is tougher and again, comes with more risk.

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