Certified Registered Nurse Infusion (CRNI)

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    I just got my CRNI certification. My IV insertion skills are the best in my entire hospital. If I can't get a peripheral IV line, the patient will need a central line because nobody else will be able to get a peripheral line. I am an expert maintaining all kind of IV accesses. I've been applying for home infusion or infusion center jobs; however, one of the requirements is experience on oncology. I know most of the antineoplastic drugs including side effects, tapering, contraindications, etc. I know the drugs because is part of my certification and I studied very hard, especially these drugs, but I have never worked on oncology. I have been working in Med/Surg for 5 years. Has anybody worked in home infusion or infusion center without oncology experience? I will appreciate any information provided.
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

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    "If I can't get a peripheral IV line, the patient will need a central line because nobody else will be able to get a peripheral line. I am an expert maintaining all kind of IV accesses." .............my, my , my-someone is sure full of themself!
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    Quote from delawaremalenurse
    "If I can't get a peripheral IV line, the patient will need a central line because nobody else will be able to get a peripheral line. I am an expert maintaining all kind of IV accesses." .............my, my , my-someone is sure full of themself!
    I don't believe that was the answer they were looking for, delawaremalenurse. Not a kindly thing to do. Don't we already get enough of this type of negativity in the culture of nursing? So the OP is confident in their skills, it is not something to be ashamed of.

    As for the answer to this, I have worked for a home infusion company as a pharmacy tech and I worked closely with the nurses in that company as well, especially the nursing manager. From what I understand, a background in oncology is highly sought after since a lot of the patient population (at least for the home infusion company I worked for) are patients who receive chemotherapy such as 5-FU. All the nurses I worked with had a background in that department. However, I suggest if you have a home infusion company in mind, try to connect with the nursing manager and ask them about the specifics of what they are looking for, each company is different, depending on their size (patient population) and their policies.

    Best of luck. And by the way, congratulations on getting your CRNI certification, I heard it is a challenging test.
    Last edit by Beautiful Mind- on Oct 24, '12
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    Thank you very much for the information. I will get in contact with the managers and find out about the specifics. Also I can transfer from med/surg to oncology and spend at least six month working there. I had been using this site for some years but I am always hesitant to post because sometimes people misunderstand you post. This is my second time posting. By the way, the test is really challenging. Thanks again. I think most nurses have a gift.
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    If you can transfer into oncology and get that experience under your belt, more power to you! Not only will you be THE nurse to go to with awesome IV insertion skills, be CRNI certified, but have an oncology background to boot! What a wonderful resume that would be. Not to mention, a great transition.

    I wish you all the best, you sound like a super duper nurse! I am sure you will get the position that you want!
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    I have worked on an IV team for 25 years now and yes it is great you are confidant in your skills , it takes the right combination of skills to be exceptional in this field and one is definitely a certain mindset. I have a long history of being excetional with peripheral access as I too can always get something in. I then evaluate the entire case to see what we need to do next..often the PIV will be good enough until we can get central access.

    I also have worked PD for a home infusion company for 17 years. This is what you can do IMO...you already have many of the areas covered to be a desirable hire for this type of company except he chemotherapy experience. You should propose that when they get a chemotherapy patient or a pt needing gancyclovir (must use chemo precautions) that you go with the nurse that is assigned and he or she can train you as you go. make sure you have read the case and researched the chemo agents and the companies policy. There is nothing wrong with doing it this way..the logistics are a bit trickier in home care but it can easily be done..I cannot tell you how many times some was assigned to meet me at a pt's home to learn ot train or how many times I had to zip in and start an IV and leave. If your community offers a chemo certification I would also try to get that but you will still have to get your hangs or pushes. If you did well on the chemo/biologics portion of the CRNI than you can easily learn the rest. I have studied for and taken the CRNI test every 3 yrs since the late 80s (chaper than going to conventions plus I continue to stay current)
    Beautiful Mind- likes this.
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    I have worked on an IV team for 25 years now and yes it is great you are confidant in your skills , it takes the right combination of skills to be exceptional in this field and one is definitely a certain mindset. I have a long history of being exceptional with peripheral access as I too can always get something in. I then evaluate the entire case to see what we need to do next..often the PIV will be good enough until we can get central access if needed .

    I also have worked PD for a home infusion company for 17 years. This is what you can do IMO...you already have many of the areas covered to be a desirable hire for this type of company except he chemotherapy experience. You should propose that when they get a chemotherapy patient or a pt needing gancyclovir (must use chemo precautions) that you go with the nurse that is assigned and he or she can train you as you go. make sure you have read the case and researched the chemo agents and the companies policy. There is nothing wrong with doing it this way..the logistics are a bit trickier in home care, but it can easily be done..I cannot tell you how many times someone was assigned to meet me at a pt's home to learn or train or how many times I had to zip in and start an IV and leave. If your community offers a chemo certification I would also try to get that but you will still have to get your hangs and pushes. If you did well on the chemo/biologics portion of the CRNI than you can easily learn the rest. I have studied for and taken the CRNI test every 3 yrs since the late 80s (cheaper than going to conventions plus I continue to stay current)
    Beautiful Mind- likes this.
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    Thank you very much. I already applied to transfer to oncology unit. As soon as there's an opening the position is mine. Also after following Brittne advise, I applied for a job in home infusion and I got it. As you said, the certification and the IV insertion skills looks very good in the resume. What they do is to assign the chemotherapy patients to nurses that have experience in oncology. They tested my knowledge on neoplastic drugs, including side effects, category, complications, etc.. and I did very good, so they will provide orientation. I will be visiting oncology patients with the oncology nurse for some time. In my medical surgical floor we work with these patients but not very often. I have administered oncology drugs and have floated to oncology units also. Thanks again for offering your expertise. I am loving it so much. I am also planning to take the CRNI test every three years to keep current because things keep changing so fast. I hope we can keep in touch. Given your vast experience I know I can learn a lot from you. Thanks for being a professional willing to share her knowledge. I already admire you.
    Beautiful Mind- likes this.
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    Susy 67..If you like it now I predict that you will continue to like it and grow in the specialty. There is so much to learn and yes it changes rapidly. As you learn..... continue to challenge yourself and continue to read and include all the Infusion nursing journals as well. Consider joining NAVAN and and try to find an active local chapter. I do have a passion for this specialty and so it is very enjoyable to keep on learning but I have always had a very curious mind. It sounds like you have a great deal of passion so keep on going and keep me posted on your progress and of course, I will be here for any questions. I also like to like to learn from others and when I meet someone of a like mind those have been the most gratifying professional relationships I have had.
  12. 0
    Congratulations on getting your job! So happy you got it.


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