BD instye autoguard angiocaths- difficulty

  1. Hi all,
    I am wondering if any of you out there use the BD Insyte Autoguard angiocaths at your facility. If so, does anyone else experience any difficulty with them? I have been starting IV's for over 14 yrs and have always been one of the folks that people come to for difficult sticks. However, with these angiocaths I still get it in the vein, but find it is nearly impossible to thread the catheter up the vein. Other nurses in my dept have adopted the technique of threading the entire needle and catheter up the vein because of this. I hate to do that, it is so traumatic to the vein esp. if using irritating meds. I learned the "textbook" technique of threading catheter only once you've acheived flash and advance a bit further. (hard to change!) Any tips or tricks would be helpful! Thanks, SG
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   Binkey
    SG... Have you tried twisting the hub ( the colored portion ) prior to insertion?
    Twist the hub one way, and then twist it back into place and insert.
    Hope that helps..
    DD


    Quote from enfermeraSG
    Hi all,
    I am wondering if any of you out there use the BD Insyte Autoguard angiocaths at your facility. If so, does anyone else experience any difficulty with them? I have been starting IV's for over 14 yrs and have always been one of the folks that people come to for difficult sticks. However, with these angiocaths I still get it in the vein, but find it is nearly impossible to thread the catheter up the vein. Other nurses in my dept have adopted the technique of threading the entire needle and catheter up the vein because of this. I hate to do that, it is so traumatic to the vein esp. if using irritating meds. I learned the "textbook" technique of threading catheter only once you've acheived flash and advance a bit further. (hard to change!) Any tips or tricks would be helpful! Thanks, SG
  4. by   enfermeraSG
    Funny you mention that, I went on their product website and they instruct the user to do just that- rotate barrel 360. What does that do? No one at my facility does that. Could that be the reason we can't push the catheter off the needle very far to thread? Thanks, SG
  5. by   Binkey
    That is the exact reason that you can't thread it... This breaks the seal and allows you to thread it off.
    DD


    Quote from enfermeraSG
    Funny you mention that, I went on their product website and they instruct the user to do just that- rotate barrel 360. What does that do? No one at my facility does that. Could that be the reason we can't push the catheter off the needle very far to thread? Thanks, SG
  6. by   TazziRN
    I love the Insytes. I used them at my last facility; my current one is trying them out and I am a superuser. Did you angle down even more after getting your flash? Then advance it a little more with the needle still in place. When you're about 1/3-1/2 way in, push the cath in with your finger while holding the needle still, then activate your guard. It's harder to thread without the needle than the others because the cath is more flexible, but once you get the hang of it, you'll love it!
  7. by   Pedi-ER-RN
    I consider myself a "good stick" and have experienced problems threading these flimsy caths!! Other co-workers have had the same problems. Will try Tazzi's recommendation and see if it helps on those hard to thread ones.
  8. by   fgoff
    I had trouble using them at 1st too. I did a sreach & found this site
    http://www.bd.com/safety/products/infusion/ If you find the type of device you have you can watch the video..

    The tip I found most useful was to turn the cath 360 degrees on the stylet. Some how this made it easier to thread the angio off the needle after the flash.

    I also liked that on the very small gauge needles that you can see the flash all along the angio.

    It took some getting use to.(Like starting IV's with both gloves on! Oh am I telling my age here!)

    Best of luck!
    fgoff
  9. by   neetnik461
    fgoff,

    Thanks so much for the BD link! I have been using the insyte since beginning my current job (as a new grad) last October. I have never, ever been instructed to turn the barrel 360 degrees (per manufacturer instructions) before inserting (even though I had a 2 hour IV insertion class as part of my orientation). As far as I know none of the nurses on my floor do this either.

    I have never been able to advance the catheter with finger pressure alone and always have to use the fingernail of my thumb at the top of the hub to get enough pressure to get the catheter to slide in (because without turning the barrel 360 the tip seal is not released!).

    I plan to print out the tips for success from the website and inform my co-workers of manufacturer suggestions.

    Thanks again !!!!!
  10. by   JentheRN05
    I don't know how many of these ended up with holes in the cath like a garden hose when I was using them! I never got ANY instruction on them, thank goodness I am a natural good stick (thanks mom ) and after a couple of tore caths (poor patients) I got the hang of it. Now that I don't use them anymore - if I do ever use them again I will know about the 360! Thanks
  11. by   sister--*
    It took our facility nurses a while to get the hang of them. Once you do you'll love them!
  12. by   TazziRN
    Ahhh.......yes, you are supposed to rotate the cath 360, to disengage it from the needle and hub. This doesn't do anything about the advancement, but it does aide in getting the cath off the needle.
  13. by   rnmi2004
    Yes, you have to rotate it before you stick. When I was learning, I forgot that step once or twice and it is nearly impossible to slide a "stuck" catheter off the needle.
  14. by   PANurseRN1
    We use Medex "ProtectIV Plus," but anesthesia uses the Isytes. They hate our cathlons and we don't like theirs. Guess it just depends on what you're used to.

    I always turn the cathlon a bit to disengage it, no matter what brand I'm using. It's nearly impossible to thread otherwise.

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