Should I become an lpn first or just go for ASN? - page 2

by Will-B

I live in northen Indiana. My question is, would it be beneficial for me to get my lpn before I get my RN? This way I could be getting some sort of experience while I'm getting my RN. I am ready to start a program fall 2011. All... Read More


  1. 0
    I would do what is best for you. Go the BSN route if you can. If not, definately get your RN first. I regret not doing that in the first place, however, the experience I have is invaluable, especially "just being an LPN..." But that is a whole other topic.......Good Luck!!
  2. 0
    Quote from EllenG
    check your state requirements. You may be able to be licensed as an LPN after 2 semesters of your RN program.
    Can you elaborate a little on this? I live in Florida and it would be great if that were possible.

    Thanks,
    NJ
  3. 0
    Quote from NJCheyla
    Can you elaborate a little on this? I live in Florida and it would be great if that were possible.

    Thanks,
    NJ
    After your first year of RN school, some states let you sit for your LPN/VN boards. Ask at your school or call the BON.
  4. 0
    I agree with Lvntobsn. If possible or I it is wat you ultimately want go straight for your BSN. I had the opportunity to pursue a BSN, but I chose AND simply b/c that's what I preerred and I'm jappy with that decision. I do plan on going to get my BSN after I get my RN, but my main goal is to become a RN asap. I see nothing wrong wit going LPN if that's what you want, I want to be an RN, but I am applying to both RN and LPN programs. I'll go to watever school accepts me, But RN is my first choice.
  5. 1
    I read a post on this site that it's better to get the LPN and some experience while you are earning your BSN.
    I did it that way for financial reasons, but it's worked out for me. I will have 6 years of being a NURSE under my belt by the time I finish my advanced degree. The recruiter said she'd rather have a former LPN who is now an RN than hire a BSN fresh out of school!
    TracyT2011 likes this.
  6. 1
    RN. If you want experience or to have a foot in the door after school, work as a student tech or CNA. Obviously a CNA role is much different but you will be in a better position to be hired by the facility you choose than others. Jobs are posted in house prior to being available to public. Good luck
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  7. 1
    I personally got my LPN first due to needing the money and I wasn't sure if I would like being a nurse. It took 11 months to complete........8 years later I went back to school for my prerequisites for 2 years (had babies to raise) then a year in transition. Transition LPN to RN or ADN if you will took one year. Tried to go back for the BSN but can't afford it financially or time wise.
    That's my experience..........now I have a desk job as an Analyst, no nights, weekends, holidays or mandatory overtime. I gotta say, so far so good, for me.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  8. 0
    Please, please, please go for your RN first!!!! As a 38-year LPN, I can tell you the good money is in hospitals; and, they are not hiring LPN's. Many are coming out of LPN school and are unable to get jobs! Also, go on for your BSN. Our hospital has just made a rule of not hiring any ADN's. If you want to transfer to another department, you have 5 years to get your BSN. The sad thing is we have a nursing school (ADN) affiliated with the hospital and they won't even hire their new grads! It's all very sad. I, too, am back in school when I should be planning my retirement. Of course, this is Ohio; and, it may not be like this in other states. I would like to know what states are hiring LPN's; perhaps I could move there and forget all the stresses here where you don't know from one day or the next if you will be phased out altogether!
  9. 0
    Quote from moodychick
    Please, please, please go for your RN first!!!! As a 38-year LPN, I can tell you the good money is in hospitals; and, they are not hiring LPN's. Many are coming out of LPN school and are unable to get jobs! Also, go on for your BSN. Our hospital has just made a rule of not hiring any ADN's. If you want to transfer to another department, you have 5 years to get your BSN. The sad thing is we have a nursing school (ADN) affiliated with the hospital and they won't even hire their new grads! It's all very sad. I, too, am back in school when I should be planning my retirement. Of course, this is Ohio; and, it may not be like this in other states. I would like to know what states are hiring LPN's; perhaps I could move there and forget all the stresses here where you don't know from one day or the next if you will be phased out altogether!

    I know here in MA hospitals are no longer hiring LPNs and I've heard they won't consider new grad ADNs either, there are Long-term acute care hospitals here and they still hire LPNs and ADNs. I think all the jobs are in LTC and there's certainly plenty of those to go around I'm not convinced it's a bad place to be I only have 1 semester of LPN school under my belt but it looks like the LPNs who work in LTC have a lot of autonomy and responsibility it certainly looked more challenging than what I saw the nurses doing at the pediatric office when I went for observation. Our instructors have been up front about it right from orientation that we will find jobs in LTC or a Dr. office, if we think we want to work at a hospital plan on doing the LPN -RN bridge.
  10. 0
    Go for the ASN. Most hospitals nowdays are trying to achieve the Magnet status and are not hiring LPNs. Also, when I was in nursing school I knew a few LPNs that were having trouble passing the NCLEX because they were used to do things a different way. Good luck!


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