Ivy Tech - Indy

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    Anyone gone through the ASN program here? I am currently looking into applying. I am finishing up my pre-req's this semester at IUPUI and plan on taking the TEAS soon. I was just curious as to how hard it is to get accepted. How many times did you have to apply? What were your grades and scores like (if you don't mind me asking)? Do you know how many people applied to the program? I know how many they accept but just wondering what the ratio is like.

    Thanks!

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  2. 12 Comments...

  3. 0
    Honey let me tell you. I was at Ivy Tech for a while and it's enough to make you jump off the roof. They take 80 people in the fall and 80 in the spring. About 1500 apply for each spot. Before you even apply you have to have perfect scores in your pre-reqs and very good scores on your TEAS. Even with perfect scores with those numbers you stll may not get in simply because of space. Then you go on a waiting list for 1-3 years. If you have the time and the patience then it's a really good school if you dont mind waiting. If you can stick it out I suggest doing so cause you cant beat the cost of the program. I couldn't wait, so I had to go elsewhere because I needed the money.
  4. 0
    Quote from CantWait2Nurse
    Honey let me tell you. I was at Ivy Tech for a while and it's enough to make you jump off the roof. They take 80 people in the fall and 80 in the spring. About 1500 apply for each spot. Before you even apply you have to have perfect scores in your pre-reqs and very good scores on your TEAS. Even with perfect scores with those numbers you stll may not get in simply because of space. Then you go on a waiting list for 1-3 years. If you have the time and the patience then it's a really good school if you dont mind waiting. If you can stick it out I suggest doing so cause you cant beat the cost of the program. I couldn't wait, so I had to go elsewhere because I needed the money.
    If you don't mind my asking-where did you go instead? Ivy Tech is one of my options because of cost and cost only, but because of all the other BS (waiting lists, etc.), I've been looking elsewhere. I'm just curious where you ended up at. Thanks!
  5. 0
    Keep in mind that with Ivy Tech they have MULTIPLE locations. If you are willing and able to commute you can increase your odds of being accepted by applying to multiple programs. For example someone living in Central Indiana could apply to Ivy Tech's ASN programs in Richmond, Columbus, Muncie, Kokomo, Bloomington and of course Indianapolis all the while staying within about 60 to 75 minutes drive time each way. Also, if you don't make the ASN program you COULD also apply to the LPN programs (which only take 1 year) and then immediately upon graduation apply into the LPN to ASN transition program (with an excellent chance of being accepted since you would only be competing against other transition applicants). I have only recently started the Indianapolis ASN program, but can tell you that the attitude of the faculty is outstanding. Their dedication makes you WANT to work harder as a student.

    I do think that it would be helpful if the various Ivy Tech campuses PUBLISHED their the average number of applicants, average GPA's and TEAS scores of each accepted class. This would give prospective students valuable information in deciding if they had a realistic chance of being accepted or if maybe their time would be better spent pursuing other options (or possibly somewhere in between). More information is better for EVERYONE and I was unable to get this data even when I asked during one of the school's information sessions (which you are required to attend before you can apply.).
  6. 0
    Quote from Ceteris Paribus
    Keep in mind that with Ivy Tech they have MULTIPLE locations. If you are willing and able to commute you can increase your odds of being accepted by applying to multiple programs. For example someone living in Central Indiana could apply to Ivy Tech's ASN programs in Richmond, Columbus, Muncie, Kokomo, Bloomington and of course Indianapolis all the while staying within about 60 to 75 minutes drive time each way. Also, if you don't make the ASN program you COULD also apply to the LPN programs (which only take 1 year) and then immediately upon graduation apply into the LPN to ASN transition program (with an excellent chance of being accepted since you would only be competing against other transition applicants). I have only recently started the Indianapolis ASN program, but can tell you that the attitude of the faculty is outstanding. Their dedication makes you WANT to work harder as a student.

    I do think that it would be helpful if the various Ivy Tech campuses PUBLISHED their the average number of applicants, average GPA's and TEAS scores of each accepted class. This would give prospective students valuable information in deciding if they had a realistic chance of being accepted or if maybe their time would be better spent pursuing other options (or possibly somewhere in between). More information is better for EVERYONE and I was unable to get this data even when I asked during one of the school's information sessions (which you are required to attend before you can apply.).
    You don't have to attend the nursing info session until before you apply to the actual nursing program right? So like, while I'm doing pre-reqs I could attend one? Oh-and if you're going to apply to more than one Ivy Tech campus for the Nursing program, do you have to fill out your FAFSA accordingly? Like put down every Ivy Tech campus??
    Last edit by lyndsaynicole on Jan 30, '07 : Reason: needed to add more
  7. 0
    I ended up at Medtech College (Indianapolis) in their practical nursing program. Not one of my brightest choices but I got right in. I attended the info session in October, took the PSB in November, and went to orientation in December and started on Janurary 2. No pre-ques or wait list. I believe this is what is truly attracted me the most. If I could do it all over again I would try to stick it out at Ivy Tech. Yeah the program is only 15 months but it cost around $18,000. At that point and time I was so frustrated with Ivy Tech I would have paid 1.4 million to be in someone's anyone's nursing program. If you have the money to spare and dont to spare yourself an hours worth of travel then medtech is OK. Not really great not really bad but good enough. Get in Get out Get Paid.
  8. 0
    According to the Nursing Chair at Ivy Tech in Bloomington, you HAVE to attend the mandetory nursing meeting before applying to the LPN-RN program.
    They have also changed their admit rules...................and the previous responders are correct. If you don't have all A's on your pre-req's and a 95 or above on the TEAS, your chance of getting in here is slim to none. If they have a tie on the pre-req's and Teas, then they look at the co-req's you have taken and you get marks according to how you did on them.
    Her suggestion to me was................do ALL pre-reqs AND co-req's before applying for the transition program. If you get a B on a pre-req, take it over to try and get an A.
    Next year is even going to be more competative to get in as they ARE in the works to phase out the LPN's.
  9. 0
    Well my overall TEAS score was only 89 and I was accepted on my first attempt into the Indianapolis ASN program (that put me in the 97th percentile nationally and in the program meaning that for every 100 people who took the TEAS, three scored higher overall). As stated above I believe that ALL Ivy Tech programs should publish (preferably on their websites as many medical schools publish their MCAT and GPA data) the statistics of each class. This would help students to guage "where they stood" and help them to determine if they should retake courses or perhaps apply into another program altogether (or pursue other allied health options at Ivy Tech that include X-Ray Tech, Respiratory Therapy and others).

    Also, if you have the bucks (or will qualify for lots of financial aide) consider THESE great options:
    a. Butler University has terrific Pharm D. and Physician assistant programs. For the Pharm D. program if you do your undergraduate work at Butler and get at least C's you are guarenteed a spot.
    b. Marion College and the University of Indianapolis (as well as Indiana Weselyn and Anderson College) also have BSN nursing programs and the competition is significantly less because MOST people cannot afford 18K per year to attend college (keep in mind that many of these private universities offer LOTS of financial aide). IF you plan on becoming an NP or especially a CRNA then taking on more debt makes more sense.
  10. 0
    I don't understand why when nursing is in such high demand, they make it damn near impossible for you to succeed. You can't get into any programs, and the ones you can cost a million dollars. You can take your pre-reqs, and by the time you finish, you've missed the deadline to apply for the actual nursing program, then you have to wait a whole semester in between, etc. etc.

    I'm not by ANY means going to let any of that stop me from becoming a nurse. But it's just frustrating as hell that this is the way that it is. There has to be a better system.
  11. 1
    There are quite a few factors at play. Here are a few:

    1. There is a discrepency between the supply of nursing programs slots, and the demand by students for those spots.

    2. It is not easy for nursing schools to simply "expand" classes since they need both the clinical spaces/instructors as well as the lecture instructors to accomodate any such expansion. Also, it often takes approval by the State Board of Nursing to expand programs.

    3. There are many "parties"/forces pushing for different agendas:
    a. Hospitals/HMO's would as soon see the market flooded with nurses so that they wouldn't have to pay as high of wages or as good of benefits and bonuses.

    b. On the other hand nursing organizations frequently want to see HIGHER STANDARDS for nurses because this raises nursing as a profession and tends to lead to better benefits/pay/working conditions for nurses.

    What we end up with tends to be somewhere in the middle.
    Places like Ivy Tech are especially in demand since not that many places even offer the ASN degree any longer and you can essentially earn allmost as much with an ASN as a BSN degree in the current job market. Plus there are many opportunities to go back and get your BSN degree often ONLINE and frequently PAID for by your employer. Whether you are talking about PS3's, education, or attractive dates the LAW of Supply and Demand is almost always at work!
    RespiratoryGirl011 likes this.


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