Dreadlocks?

  1. 0
    Right now I am doing my pre-reqs to try to get into the RN program at Ivy Tech. I am also about to put my hair in dreadlocks very soon. Before I do, I would like to know if you think it will be hard for me to get a job? They will not be a complete mess and contrary to popular belief they can be washed and they are just as clean as other hair styles. I am just worried that it may affect my ability to get a job and also I am worried about what my instructors may think. My hair is long so they will be able to be put in a ponytail and pulled back out of my face. Please be as honest and critical as ever lol. I just want honest opinions. Thanks!!
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  4. 1
    My handbook makes me think they might say something to you. You have to have your hair pulled back if it is long. You can't have fake or long nails. You have to wear hose!! What the heck! They stress all day long to look professional. So that said....I don't see dreadlocks being considered professional, but who knows. Not to mention I don't think I have ever seen a medical professional with dreadlocks. Goodk luck to you in your program.
    tabatheena likes this.
  5. 1
    I have dreadlocks for 5 years now. They are long and look very clean. Couple weeks ago, a patient asked to feel my locs. If you see my dreads, you would think they are micro breads. I wash them very often and use top of the line products. I usually pull them back while I am working. Although I am not a nurse yet, I have a job offer on the unit that I am doing my externship. Rightnow, I am a nutritionist consultant working in an office environment. Base on my experience, I would say, it is depends on how you maintain the locs. Some dreadlocs can look really messy and dirty. In my opinion, dreadlocs have to be maintained just like other hairstyles.
    tabatheena likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from tabatheena
    Right now I am doing my pre-reqs to try to get into the RN program at Ivy Tech. I am also about to put my hair in dreadlocks very soon. Before I do, I would like to know if you think it will be hard for me to get a job? They will not be a complete mess and contrary to popular belief they can be washed and they are just as clean as other hair styles. I am just worried that it may affect my ability to get a job and also I am worried about what my instructors may think. My hair is long so they will be able to be put in a ponytail and pulled back out of my face. Please be as honest and critical as ever lol. I just want honest opinions. Thanks!!

    You may be getting some "looks" but if your hair is maintained well and you keep it properly contained, I can't see that there would be a problem.

    If you are locking your hair for religious reasons, I suspect you are in the same position as someone who wears a hijab, modest clothing or a turban, etc. Unusual in this country, but not out of line.

    If you are locking for purely aesthetic reasons, you may get more grief. Once again, cleanliness and proper confinement on the job are key.

    I had dreadlocks for 7 years and had no problems. Of course, I was already on the job for 4 years and had a great relationship with my supervisors when I started them. I think it's all in the attitude and in the maintenance.
    Last edit by XB9S on Jul 31, '08 : Reason: adding quote tags
  7. 0
    I'm only a soon to be nursing student but I don't see a problem with dreadlocks. I'm also from Chicago though and dreadlocks are pretty common here for both males and females. No offense to anyone but some parts of Indiana aren't as modern or contemporary as Chicago.
  8. 0
    People need to look past the outside of a persons looks and concentrate more on the ability of that person in relation to the career they chose to go into or the human/soul inside of them. ( deep huh)

    I know several people with dreadlocks, tatoos, piercings and are some of the best nurses I know. In fact, some bikers I have met that have long hair, tatooed all over- are some of the most genuine, caring people I know but they are not given a chance because of the way they appear on the outside and people assume they are hardcore idiots who care little or nothing about anything.
    But I do know employeers don't look at it that way. A visual 1st impression is usually makes their minds up right away about someone. Sad.
    But unfortunatly patients can look upon a nurse in this way also and think the worst of them or on the opposite end of the scale have a very open mind and admire their talent as a nurse even though they sort of look rough. Some hospitals will accept them, some won't.
    It also depends on the schools dress policy. Some will not allow hoop earrings, jewelry, hair has to be neat and clean, etc etc.


    Good luck!

    -Brenda
    Last edit by Innurse78 on Jul 30, '08
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    Honest and critical as ever right??

    OK dont do it, and here is my thoughts--Personally I could care less if the person taking care of me or my student or my employee has dreadlocks---but then again I am not your boss, patient or employer.

    Nursing school itself is hard enough and people are judgemental, you dont want your 1st impression on anyone to be a bad one, as then your in the hole already and need to dig yourself out, so start out on an even playing field.

    You wont know all the rules at the hospitals you will be doing clinicals at. I know one of my clinical assisnments was very strict. No wedding rings or jewelry of any sort, pure white shoes, not even a pink nike swish. So that meant I had to put white tape over my pink swish, 2 second solution. Dreadlocks---I have never worn them but is it not a process to get them and then get them out??? So lets say your going to Hospital A and your told "oh and no dreadlocks" can you take them out the night before? The night your supposed to be doing your care plans and looking up all your meds and tx?

    I think personal expression is a wonderful thing, but you just dont know what others will think of your outward impression, so do yourself a favor and go low key. Wait until you land a great job in a work env you shine in, and then go with the dreadlocks, by this time your staff will know and love you and your good work ethic and they will not think anything wrong of your hair style.

    But I would hate for you to not even get the chance because of your hair style.
  10. 1
    Just call and ask the nursing dept now, before you get in, or before you get them goin. I had a friend years ago that had to cut his dreads and was wayyyyy depressed. They are work and become a part of you, sucks to lose that!
    sophistomommaRN likes this.
  11. 1
    I would get the job first and then get them.It's sad but people do judge...I love dreads and I wear braids for most of the year,but i ALWAYS wear my hair down for interviews because even though I know that most folks with braids,dreads,or tattos can be great ,everyone is not that open and have not had the same experiences as I.
    sophistomommaRN likes this.
  12. 1
    Quote from tabatheena
    Right now I am doing my pre-reqs to try to get into the RN program at Ivy Tech. I am also about to put my hair in dreadlocks very soon. Before I do, I would like to know if you think it will be hard for me to get a job? They will not be a complete mess and contrary to popular belief they can be washed and they are just as clean as other hair styles. I am just worried that it may affect my ability to get a job and also I am worried about what my instructors may think. My hair is long so they will be able to be put in a ponytail and pulled back out of my face. Please be as honest and critical as ever lol. I just want honest opinions. Thanks!!
    While it certainly isn't considered a "professional" look for nursing, I don't see the harm in clean, neat dreads. A little personality in a nurse is always refreshing for a patient to see.
    sophistomommaRN likes this.


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