Why is it sooo ridiculous???

  1. 0
    I have been researching non-stop, I feel like my head is going to explode! I would like to just become an Lpn in the beggining and go back and finish with Bsn, why is it so difficult with this transferring of credits? I live in Chicago so unfortunately I can't get into any of the good programs out in the burbs eg.. Oakton, Triton. I am so frustrated! I just wanted to start a new career and be able to move up the ladder, unfortunately most schools I call say they will not accept most of my credits, including my Lpn training. All of the Chicago public colleges are ghetto, I don't feel I get a fair chance here. What can I do to get into a better school??
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I can hear the frustration in your post, and don't have much information to offer, but wanted to let you know that I appreciate your dilemma.

    RN education programs often refuse to accept coursework from other programs, so unless you attend a school with both an LPN program and an RN program, you will probably have to repeat courses. That hardly seems like an efficient use of time or money. Joliet Junior College used to have both LPN and RN programs. I don't know if they still do, or what the waiting list would be like.

    Have you considered entering an RN program right off the bat? U of I offers one of the best BSN programs (IMO), and since it is a state school, tuition is reasonable. Maybe you could consider that as an option.

    Best of luck to you!
  5. 0
    It has mostly d/t money and laziness. The programs lose money in the short term if they allow you to transfer credits, but what most don't realize is that they would gain more students overall. The other reason is it takes time/resources to set up transition programs or ways to intergrate LVN students into these programs.
    I was lucky when I did my LVN to BSN not only did we get to skip the 1st semester of the normal program but you could challenge the final in 4 of the courses and graduate in 1yr after all your prereqs were done. That program is in Texas though....

    Your best bet is probably to get an LVN then ADN and then do the BSN online. I couldn't afford it at the time, but if you can swing it is well worth to just go ahead and get your BSN.
  6. 0
    Some colleges will let you have in district tuition if you work within their school district. That is what I did. Look into whatever school you want to attend and then find out if that is an option. I just had to provide a pay stub each semester and they changed my tuition rates, so even if I only worked at the job once a year it didn't matter. As far as transfer credits go if you can't get them transfered then you should consider picking up with what they will accept and take the rest over, it stinks but at least you'll reach your ultimate goal.
  7. 2
    Quote from natkoz1982
    I have been researching non-stop, I feel like my head is going to explode! I would like to just become an Lpn in the beggining and go back and finish with Bsn, why is it so difficult with this transferring of credits? I live in Chicago so unfortunately I can't get into any of the good programs out in the burbs eg.. Oakton, Triton. I am so frustrated! I just wanted to start a new career and be able to move up the ladder, unfortunately most schools I call say they will not accept most of my credits, including my Lpn training. All of the Chicago public colleges are ghetto, I don't feel I get a fair chance here. What can I do to get into a better school??

    Ghetto?....yeah you're going to make a fine nurse. That's pretty rude and very wrong.

    Good luck working with a diversified staff in your future career.
    cute-1 and fournee like this.
  8. 0
    did you try indiana? if you are in chicago it's not too far to drive. look into ivy tech for lpn, i am at indiana university northwest for my bsn and live in chicago heights illinois.
  9. 3
    Remember, nursing programs are accredited INDIVIDUALLY. The NLN doesn't not come and offer a blanket approval for all the programs in a given area. With that, you must understand that for a program to stay accredited, they must have certain courses that comply with minimum standards. Also, they must advance and graduate students at a rate that is consistent with NLN guidelines. One program cannot be assured of the content a potential applicant learned and indeed retained from another program. They can only control the content of their own program. Now, perhaps they can offer some sort of entrance test based on the content they are attempting to transfer as long as it reasonably matched the content of the accepting school, but can you imagine the nightmare of creating that exam? No two applicants are alike I'm sure, coming from all sorts of different programs at different levels. It would be nuts.

    As for the city colleges being "ghetto", I'm afraid I must take offense to that statement. Yes many schools are located in areas that are less than desireable, but the schools themselves fulfill a mission that many people would otherwise not be able to obtain. They offer all the basic services of any other community college, but a few don't have the "fluff" that many of the suburban schools have.
    cute-1, fournee, and BookwormRN like this.
  10. 0
    I took a couple of my Biology prereq's at Harold Washington and Truman College and was pleased with the competency of my instructors, as well as their passion for helping students achieve their long-term goals. Most of my classmates (I took evening/weekend classes) were like me- professionals who were looking to make a career change into nursing, medicine or OT. I've heard from a number of other nursing students (and nurses, for that matter) that Truman College's ADN program is excellent. Unfortunately, the wait-list is pretty long. Anyway, I am posting this reply to encourage you to take another look at CCC because the classes are very affordable and transfer all across the state. I agree with the other posters- going directly into a BSN program would probably make the most sense.
  11. 0
    I don't think Truman has a waitlist. I actually think some of the classes at CC are harder. I know some people who went to 4-year universities say that the nursing pre-reqs were easier than the nursing classes. I think that many of the pre-reqs were actually harder than many of the nursing classes. I think some of the profs from CC make the classes harder to prove that CC aren't easier than universities.
  12. 0
    Ghetto?????

    If you think that of the community colleges, then don't bother working in Chicago as a nurse. Whatever makes you think the colleges are ghetto is probably also present in every hospital in the city.

    I have worked with many nurses who were grads of CCCs, and they all had good foundations.

    Improving your outlook may help you get into a "better" school. Next time think before you hit that 'submit' button.


Top