Nursing Program Waiting lists??

  1. Hi everyone!

    I need help. I am currently a senior right now and i need help on picking a college to go to. I want to major in nursing bsn but i do not know what school to go to for my rn first. I heard most of the schools in illinois have waiting lists now for the nursing program. I was planning to go to uic for nursing but the thing is that the rep. that i talked to recently said that about 600 ppl apply for the nursing program and only about 100 get into the program. You are not even guarenteed into the program unless you get a 28 on you act, which i did no recieve. And if i fail...what am i suppose to do know...i would waste 2 years. I also thought about going to COD (college of dupage) but i heard they have a waiting list. ANd i can't go to other community colleges for thier 2 year nursing program because they only allow in district students. So does anyone know what colleges offer a nursing program that does not have a waiting list? I just want to get my RN license early as possible and not have to wait. Also any community colleges in Illinois that accept out of district students also with no waiting list?!!? PLEASE IF ANYONE KNOWS ANY INFO. PLease reply!
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   clcstudent22307
    I attend a community college in Lake County, IL. (CLC). Just coming out of highschool you'd need a bunch of prerequisites anyway so you should start the process (name on wait list, test taking, etc.) and take the other courses. You usually don't just enter a nursing program right out of high school as there are many requirements to get in the program (college Bio, Chem, A & P). Take those classes first.
  4. by   jjen521
    I just graduated from Harper College in Palatine, IL ....from my experience with the whole process....how it works, is you will need to work on any prerequisites that are required before you are even looked at by the school. Once you have this all done, then you can submit an application and wait to see if you are accepted.

    As you mentioned with Uic, it is true for nursing programs in the suburbs as well....there are a far greater number of applicants than there are actual spots. Your grades on your prerequisites need to be very good as well as any Act or entrance exams scores. You will either be accepted into the program, put on a waiting list, or rejected. But note, that IF you are put onto a waiting list, this is just a waiting list if spots open up of people who were accepted but choose now not to take the spot. Once all spots are full, then you are no longer on that waiting list and would need to reapply the next time around and go through the entire process again. This is how the waiting list at Harper worked. If you were lucky enough to get onto the waiting list in the first place but then unlucky enough for none of the accepted applicants to not take their spot, this is where it ends for you.....you are not just automatically rolled over onto the waiting list when the application process starts over for the next session.

    Another thing, is to not put all your eggs in one basket. Apply to more than one school. But, yes if you are not indistrict this makes it even more difficult. Schools will always accept students that are indistrict before they look at students who are not.

    Hope this helps
  5. by   destined2bCRNA
    OP, what part of Illinois are you in?
  6. by   livingthedream
    UIC is a 4 year program, but the other schools you mention are for Associates - do you want a 4 year, or do you want a 2 year?

    For a 4 year - there is NIU in DeKalb, they have a very good Nursing school - not sure the waiting list. You could take pre-reqs at a community college and then transfer there. There are also many other 4 year schools not too far from the city - Eastern, Western, Northern, UofI in champaign, etc.

    When looking at associates, some require you to live in district (like COD) and some do not. There is JJC (Joliet Junior College), Harper, COD, Oakton, then the entire CCC (chicago City Colleges) they have 2 programs at 2 different locations in the city. The CCC will give you discounted tuition if you live in the Chicago city limits, if you are out of the city - you pay more, no other restrictions that I am aware of.

    All schools sort of do their own thing about lists and all that. If you have the chance and the $$ to go to a 4 year school, I would do that. A BSN is nice to have and will allow you to easily get an MSN if you want later. If you need to do it quicker, then go the associate route - either way, you end up the same - an RN and it sounds like that is your goal.

    Just remember that a blocked path does not mean the end of the road, it just means that you should turn a different direction and see what other paths are there....
  7. by   ohsnapples
    Quote from livingthedream
    UIC is a 4 year program, but the other schools you mention are for Associates - do you want a 4 year, or do you want a 2 year?

    For a 4 year - there is NIU in DeKalb, they have a very good Nursing school - not sure the waiting list. You could take pre-reqs at a community college and then transfer there. There are also many other 4 year schools not too far from the city - Eastern, Western, Northern, UofI in champaign, etc.

    When looking at associates, some require you to live in district (like COD) and some do not. There is JJC (Joliet Junior College), Harper, COD, Oakton, then the entire CCC (chicago City Colleges) they have 2 programs at 2 different locations in the city. The CCC will give you discounted tuition if you live in the Chicago city limits, if you are out of the city - you pay more, no other restrictions that I am aware of.

    All schools sort of do their own thing about lists and all that. If you have the chance and the $$ to go to a 4 year school, I would do that. A BSN is nice to have and will allow you to easily get an MSN if you want later. If you need to do it quicker, then go the associate route - either way, you end up the same - an RN and it sounds like that is your goal.

    Just remember that a blocked path does not mean the end of the road, it just means that you should turn a different direction and see what other paths are there....
    Thanks! But doesn't the nursing program in Harper only accept people in-district?! Do you know if COD has a waiting list?! word is going around that they do and that it will take me longer to finish my rn. i just want to finish my rn, so i can transfer to get my bsn at a university.
  8. by   livingthedream
    I am not sure about the waiting list - but if your end goal is a BSN anyway- I would just go to a 4 year.... it will be faster in the long-run. And if you are from IL, apply for the legislative scholarship from your local state rep. that is how I went to 4 years of undergrad for free and then I was an RA to pay for room and board. I ended with no loans, no debt at all.

    By going the 4 year route, there are no pre-reqs, just get in. By going 2 year, you may have pre-reqs, then a wait list, and THEN another year or two to get the BSN.
  9. by   clcstudent22307
    get your ADN first and THEN have a hospital (that you work for) pay for your BSN. This is yet another reason why community college programs are tough to get into...they are less expensive and the other poster is right...the end result is the same - RN.
  10. by   livingthedream
    I don't want to say either way what is better or worse, but if money is not the issue (which you did not say it was) then I would look into 4 year schools. If you have to take pre-reqs to get into a program, then go through the program, that is longer than 2 years. THEN to get the BSN you have to get a job, then see what hours you work, then apply for RN-BSN and then start school again - and if there is a wait-list on that - it could be more time.

    For me, I went to a 4 year school and got my BS in something else, now I am going back and getting my Masters in Nursing through an MENP. I loved my 4 years away - it gave me time to ground myself. And I got scholarships and worked as an RA (dorm advisor) so I came out with no debt or loans. And I did not get that great of grades, so the $$ is out there if you look for it.

    I think it all depends on what you want to do... that is what I would concentrate on.
  11. by   illinipeds
    I actually applied to COD as a back up so I can only speak from my experience. You should have all of the prereqs finished (with very good grades) before applying and do well on the entrance exam and you should be accepted. They base everything on a point system, so the more points you get the greater chance you have of getting in. I would suggest going to the COD nursing department, getting the checklist, and making sure that you complete everything you can before applying. This does mean at least a year of classes before applying though.

    I was put on CODs waitlist because I did not have all of the prereqs finished before applying. I was actually enrolled in the courses but grades weren't posted until the day the prereqs were due and was 1 hour short of a bachelor's degree. Ironically, I was accepted to DePaul's Master's Entry Program and was very high on UIC's wait list for their GEP program (because I already have a BS). So what I am saying is yes COD is hard to get into; not necessarily because you have to be smart to get into the program, but because they just base it on who has all the stuff done. The waitlist does not carry over from year to year; however, so that does increase your chances.

    However, what I would honestly suggest is that you go to a four-year university. It will be quicker in the long run and you will receive a better more well rounded education. You seem to have your heart set on staying in Chicago, but there are other four-year nursing schools in Illinois, including ISU and SIU.

    Good Luck!
  12. by   Billsgirl
    hi! i read this post and had to chime in, because i was very recently in your shoes! only, i'm not a senior in high school, i'm 37 years old!:spin:
    i attend prairie state college in chicago heights illinois. i have been going to school on and off for about 15 years. i finally have the opportunity to complete my schooling and reach my goals, then during my cna class this summer i was informed of the waiting list at not only prairie state, but pretty much everywhere!!! i became very frustrated. i looked into many other schools in the surrounding areas and was told that because i am out of their district, my chances were slim to none i would ever get into their programs.
    i solved my problem by deciding to pursue a bsn instead of an asn, and i start at indiana university this spring and in their bsn program fall 08. check into indiana university northwest if it's near you, or any 4 year program, you will be able to get you education done and not have to waste time on lists! best of luck!!
    Last edit by Billsgirl on Oct 19, '07 : Reason: miss spelling
  13. by   mouse72
    I'm a nursing student at NIU....there are more than 1000 applicants for about 150 spots each year. You are accepted for Fall or Spring, deadline to apply for either one is February.
  14. by   bansplt2
    mouse..
    how do you like it? I'm looking into their BS to BSN program. Do you know anything about the accelerated program- which one are you in? Any info would be greatly appreciated!

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