is being an NP in IL really that bad?

  1. I hear the AMA is in chicago so IL is really behind when it comes to promoting the profession of NPs. Does it seem like in the future (next 10 yrs say) that it will become more progressive at all? I just don't understand, don't NPs lower the cost for the healthcare system? They just seem like such a wonderful alternative for many pts. Thanks!
    (psst...i just started my bsn nursc classes last wk & am thrilled that I'm that much closer to being a nurse like the rest of you!!!!! )
    •  
  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   suebird3
    I live well enough South of 'The City', and we have quite a few NP's around here.

    SueB
  4. by   jov
    Quote from crazylilkelly
    I just don't understand, don't NPs lower the cost for the healthcare system?
    Let me enlighten you. The NP's take business from doctors. Are you in favor of LPN's and CNA's doing the work of RN's?
  5. by   crazylilkelly
    Quote from jov
    Let me enlighten you. The NP's take business from doctors. Are you in favor of LPN's and CNA's doing the work of RN's?
    I wouldn't want my job to be threatened but w/ the nursing shortage I would definitely be in favor of CNAs & LPNs doing jobs they are trained for. Isn't that what CNAs do? They do some of the basic stuff that RNs can do but are there to help out w/ better healthcare delivery? My professor said there's a shortage of family practice docs (that's why my friend in med school got a full ride-she wants to be a fam doc). Don't NPs help in that they take care of some of the more "basic" stuff docs can do???
    I'm definitely not attacking your post. I completely understand what you're saying. I guess I'm just figuring out the if this than why not that's of the limited knowledge I know about this topic. Just trying to sort it out. Thanks for your perspective (honestly!...ugh, I hate how posting/emails can be easily misread b/c of the lack of non-verb comm! I feel like it seems that i'm rebuttling your post when I'm not).
    I've had a few docs that drilled w/ me in the navy tell me they love NPs & that there should be more of them. That was nice to hear from them.

    One more Q on NPs----- what is the difference in the scope of an NP & a family doc???? I heard that NPs can only prescribe certain meds. Thanks guys!
    Last edit by crazylilkelly on Sep 2, '06
  6. by   crazylilkelly
    Quote from suebird3
    I live well enough South of 'The City', and we have quite a few NP's around here.

    SueB
    About how far of a drive from the city??? Are we talking right south of I-80 or closer to kankakee???? Don't worry about answering if you think that's too much info.
  7. by   Jolie
    It is true that NP's in IL have had a long journey to gain some of the privileges that were granted much earlier to NP's in other states, such as prescriptive authority and the ability to sign physical forms.

    I worked with some pioneering NP's over 20 years ago at Rush, and have recently been in contact with NP's in our doctors' offices (in the Joliet area). They all seemed satisfied with their work, and respected by the physicians and nurses whith whom they work, but have had a long battle to gain some practice privileges that NP's elsewhere were granted long ago. I have no doubt that may be due, at least in part, to the AMA presence in the State of IL.

    I have worked with NP's who provided primary care to NICU and PICU patients, carried a patient load in physicians' offices (OB/GYN and PEDS), managed and staffed well-patient and vaccine clinics in county health departments and college health services, taught in BSN programs, and managed the in-patient care of psych patients. I'm sure this is just a short list of the many possibilities that exist for NP graduates.

    If this avenue of practice truly interests you, I hope you will not be deterred by the AMA!
  8. by   crazylilkelly
    Quote from Jolie
    It is true that NP's in IL have had a long journey to gain some of the privileges that were granted much earlier to NP's in other states, such as prescriptive authority and the ability to sign physical forms.

    I worked with some pioneering NP's over 20 years ago at Rush, and have recently been in contact with NP's in our doctors' offices (in the Joliet area). They all seemed satisfied with their work, and respected by the physicians and nurses whith whom they work, but have had a long battle to gain some practice privileges that NP's elsewhere were granted long ago. I have no doubt that may be due, at least in part, to the AMA presence in the State of IL.

    I have worked with NP's who provided primary care to NICU and PICU patients, carried a patient load in physicians' offices (OB/GYN and PEDS), managed and staffed well-patient and vaccine clinics in county health departments and college health services, taught in BSN programs, and managed the in-patient care of psych patients. I'm sure this is just a short list of the many possibilities that exist for NP graduates.

    If this avenue of practice truly interests you, I hope you will not be deterred by the AMA!
    thanks! I'm actually not really sure what I will ultimately end up pursuing. I just started my bsn nursc classes last wk, so I still have 2 yrs til I become an RN. And I know I want to work a few yrs as a RN before considering going for my masters. Nonetheless, I love learning about all the nursing options out there! Becoming a NP is a really big option in the far future. I might as well learn as much now to prepare me for what could possibly become my career.
  9. by   jov
    Quote from crazylilkelly
    I wouldn't want my job to be threatened but w/ the nursing shortage I would definitely be in favor of CNAs & LPNs doing jobs they are trained for. Isn't that what CNAs do? They do some of the basic stuff that RNs can do but are there to help out w/ better healthcare delivery?
    o.k you are not quite getting this. You are in favor of CNA's and LPN's taking over some of the "basic" nursing duties because of the nursing shortage. So let me ask you this: What happens when the nursing shortage is over?
  10. by   traumaRUs
    Hi and welcome and congrats on starting nursing school. I live near Peoria, IL and am an advanced practice RN with a large nephrology group. I am a clinical nurse specialist which in the state of IL is no different than an NP. I do the medical management of two outpatient chronic dialysis units which is about 200 patients. I am required to see each of them three times per month. I handle basically all complaints as many of these patients have no primary care provider.

    I'm not taking the job of an RN, I'm taking the place of an MD who would have to round on these patients and do the management if I didn't.

    The roles of advanced practice nursing in IL have changed dramatically over the years and we can thank our predecessors for that. I can prescribe just about anything as long as its something that would be provided in the course of my care of these patients.

    RN's and NP's, CNS's, other APNs have DIFFERENT roles - we are not in competition for each other. When I was an RN, I did RN duties which did not include prescribing, advanced assessment, ordering treatments, etc.. However, because I was an RN for many years, I have a sincere appreciation for all nurses.

    This is one of the reasons the AMA is so strong in the US - they stick together. This is what we must do in order to effect change.

    BTW - the Illinois Society of Advanced Practice Nurses is a great resource too.
  11. by   Gennaver
    Quote from jov
    o.k you are not quite getting this. You are in favor of CNA's and LPN's taking over some of the "basic" nursing duties because of the nursing shortage. So let me ask you this: What happens when the nursing shortage is over?
    Hello,
    It may be possible that it isn't the op that is misugided here.

    Scopes of practice are different for doctors, for N.P.s, for R.N.s for LPNs and for CNAs. What you are suggesting is misinformed, to put it mildly.

    Gen
  12. by   jov
    the original discussion was "why would the AMA not be in favor of NP's" and what is trying to be shown is the AMA (as representing MD's) fears losing ground in its MD territory just as RN's fear losing ground in nursing territory. Different scopes of practice among all, true, but the nursing shortage brings up the question why not just increase the scope of practice of LPN's and CNA's. So we can have "aides" that hand out medication because we all know what is the big deal about handing out a pill?

    otherwise, maybe you can share why the AMA balks at NP's? I am interested in your slant on it.
    Last edit by jov on Sep 10, '06
  13. by   traumaRUs
    The AMA as an entity is NOT against APN's. What they don't want is independent practice. I work for an integrated (both MD's and APN's) practice and this is the AMA guideline regarding integrated practices:

    "In an integrated practice, there should be a professional and courteous relationship between physician and nurse practitioner, with mutual acknowledgment of, and respect for each other's contributions to patient care."

    The URL is: http://www.ama-assn.org/apps/pf_new/.../H-160.950.HTM

    While I do feel that APN's can function autonomously, it is also true that we are not physicians and so are required to have a collaborative agreement.
  14. by   jov
    Quote from traumaRUs

    While I do feel that APN's can function autonomously, it is also true that we are not physicians and so are required to have a collaborative agreement.
    but isn't that a state by state mandate. For example, NP's in KY are not required to have a collaborative agreement.

    So would it be a fair conclusion to draw that the reason why IL AMA/physicians don't want independent practice for NP's is because it would be competitive to their own patient market...

close