The age old question: ADN or BSN? - page 2

by MaleCNA87

Dear fellow allnurses, I am sure this has been addressed many times before, but I wanted to start a new thread in hopes of finding some current/new information regarding whether to get an ADN or BSN in Illinois, specifically... Read More


  1. 0
    Steph,

    Which school has this option you are talking about?

    Thanks for all the great advice. I guess my main concern is finding a job in Chicago with an ADN. Many people make it seem like it is impossible.

    Another pro of taking the ADN route is that I can keep my job and I am sure it is less intense and stressful than an accelerated BSN program. Not that it won't be challenging, I am sure it will be, but ABSN programs are condensed so they go through more material in less time.

    I had decided on the ABSN program but now I am leaning more toward the ADN. I just don't know if I want to wait to get my BSN and be in school for ~3 more years. I'll be 28 by then! Ah!

    Also, I've applied for some scholarships but that is also up in the air. If I was awarded one that would help out A LOT and I think I would do the ABSN program in that case. The issues there is that I won't know until July or August if I've been chosen. This is so frustrating ha.
    Last edit by MaleCNA87 on May 29, '12
  2. 0
    I'd go to BSN route. Most hospitals now want their nurses to have their BSN. I think it still counts as an advantage in this competitive time for new grads.

    I just got my BSN, and I did so because I want to do master's degree and eventually DNP in the future. I also got offered a job in a magnet hospital a few days before I graduated.
  3. 1
    As an ADN nurse (who just graduated from an RN to BSN program), I need to tell you that my fellow nurses on here are right--it CAN be practically impossible to get a job with an ADN. I know a lot of people who will jump on that statement, but that has been my experience. Many have pointed out important things to consider, so I would just like to add: what about your quality of life? Nursing school is really hard, and a BSN is pretty much required these days. You said yourself it is your goal. Why take the long way around just to save a few dollars? You are young, and I can tell you that you won't have much of a social life while in nursing school. Why prolong the experience to arrive at the same end? Not to mention, it is incredibly disheartening to work your butt off in an ADN program only to be essentially told that your education means nothing because your degree is not good enough. It happened to me, and I graduated with a 4.0--still not good enough. This is why I point everyone on AN to the BSN route.
    RUBY2623RN likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from tammy1019
    As an ADN nurse (who just graduated from an RN to BSN program), I need to tell you that my fellow nurses on here are right--it CAN be practically impossible to get a job with an ADN. I know a lot of people who will jump on that statement, but that has been my experience. Many have pointed out important things to consider, so I would just like to add: what about your quality of life? Nursing school is really hard, and a BSN is pretty much required these days. You said yourself it is your goal. Why take the long way around just to save a few dollars? You are young, and I can tell you that you won't have much of a social life while in nursing school. Why prolong the experience to arrive at the same end? Not to mention, it is incredibly disheartening to work your butt off in an ADN program only to be essentially told that your education means nothing because your degree is not good enough. It happened to me, and I graduated with a 4.0--still not good enough. This is why I point everyone on AN to the BSN route.
    Yeah Tammy, I am sure it must be tough when you are not recognized for your hard work and dedication. Was it difficult for you to obtain a job with an ADN?

    Do you know if it's impossible to get a job in home care, long term care or assisted living facilities as well as new grad with an ADN? Or is it just hard to get into a hospital?

    Also, you said from your experience this is what you've encountered. Is that within Chicago or somewhere in IL? I've also heard that it depends where you are located.
    Last edit by RickyLatino87 on May 29, '12 : Reason: edit
  5. 0
    Bump.

    Any others in similar situations or who can offer their 2 cents?

    I have a friend who has her BSN and works at MacNeal hospital. She says they always hire new grads but not sure if that includes ADN.

    I've looked at job postings for different hospitals and nursing homes and that did not help much. Most of then had positions that included RN liccense required, ADN required, BSN required or BSN preferred... So it seems like it's all over the place. I'm really having trouble with this decision and wish I knew what to do. I know you guys said that there is no wrong or right way but I don't want to go to school, graduate and not be able to find a job. I already went through that and it was not fun at all.
  6. 0
    You have a tough decision to make... my 2 cents:

    Having completing an ABSN at Loyola and seeing a mountain of student loan debt a few years ago, I was all for the ADN route. But with the current job climate, and especially given your location in Chicago, I lean (slightly) towards the ABSN.

    Of course, getting a BSN won't guarantee you a job at graduation, but it will allow you to apply to a lot more positions. e.g. Loyola, Northwestern, University of Chicago, Illinois Masonic, and Rush all require a BSN.

    Don't worry about the clinical aspect of ADN vs BSN. As someone else mentioned, all programs have the same clinical hours requirement, and even the 12.5 month program I did had the same number of clinical hours as the 4-year BSN (at Loyola).
  7. 0
    Quote from tswim
    You have a tough decision to make... my 2 cents:

    Having completing an ABSN at Loyola and seeing a mountain of student loan debt a few years ago, I was all for the ADN route. But with the current job climate, and especially given your location in Chicago, I lean (slightly) towards the ABSN.

    Of course, getting a BSN won't guarantee you a job at graduation, but it will allow you to apply to a lot more positions. e.g. Loyola, Northwestern, University of Chicago, Illinois Masonic, and Rush all require a BSN.

    Don't worry about the clinical aspect of ADN vs BSN. As someone else mentioned, all programs have the same clinical hours requirement, and even the 12.5 month program I did had the same number of clinical hours as the 4-year BSN (at Loyola).
    Thanks for your advice! I was accepted to Loyola's ABSN program and am thinking of going there or taking the ADN route at a community college. If you don't mind me asking, did you pay for the whole program through loans? I know they offer "limited" scholarships after the first semester, do you know anything about that? When did you graduate? Would you recommend the program?
  8. 0
    There are definitely jobs out there for ADN. 4 people I graduated with had jobs before we even finished school.Another thing to think about is tuition reimbursement for the RN-BSN. I currently work for a hospital that will pay 100% for me to get my BSN (minus books).
  9. 0
    may 28 by malecna87 may 28 by malecna87 a member since may '11. posts: 25 likes: 4
    awards:

    dear fellow allnurses,

    i am sure this has been addressed many times before, but i wanted to start a new thread in hopes of finding some current/new information regarding whether to get an adn or bsn in illinois, specifically in the chicago land area.

    i am currently in this complicated and frustrating situation where i have been accepted to both an adn and an accelerated bsn program and am not sure which one to choose. if i go the adn route, tuition would be much cheaper (less than 10k) but i will finish in 2 years with an adn. if i take the bsn route, i will finish in 16 months but i will be drowned with around 48k in debt, plus 20k i already have from my previous degree.

    i really want to go the bsn route since it is shorter and that is my ultimate goal, to obtain my bsn. i know there are numerous rn to bsn programs out there that would be a lot cheaper but would take longer.

    my question to you all is this whether you would take the adn or bsn route and why? also, i have heard many stories (mostly on here) about new grads not being able to find work. is this true for both adn and bsn new grads? i honestly would go with the adn route if i knew i would be able to get a job after i graduated and passed the nclex whether it be in a hospital, ltc or home care is not an issue for me at this point. i just want to know if i would be able to get an rn position with an adn. any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    my advice would be, since your aim for the bsn, depends on how old u are & how much time u can spend getting it. if you need to get your adn first,(b/c of money issues) then get that & when u start working as an adn rn, (youll have $ to go back for your bsn). i posted here before that i completed a c.e. on www.nurse.com a c.e. about entrylevel to practice. its been talked about & debated according to this c.e since the 1960's but here in illinois, some hospitals are already telling their adn rn's & lpn's to get their bsn withing 6 yrs or they will be let go. so this is already being implemented even tho it hasnt officially been the accepted nursing level acedemically. so my advice is to all lpns & adn rn's,.....get your bsn then u will be able to get a job.


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