Please share with me your experiences with this.... - page 3

by *LA* 9,633 Views | 41 Comments

Ok, well, here goes. m new here. I actually found this site when I was looking for "white nurses clogs". I googled that phrase and a journal from this site came up. ( Im going back to work soon, after being home for 4 yrs and am... Read More


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    Quote from MFlash
    I had a very different experience but my experience is in the same category (mind boggling). My dad died on February 15, 2005. Just before he died he was in a state of euphoria. One of the things that he said to me was that he could see pretty yellow flowers in my eyes. That alone is not that mind boggling but when you put it with the fact that he told my sister he could see streams of water flowing out of her eyes, it is. Especially when exactly four weeks later my sister died of cancer (she was 52). She had been sick with pnuemonia and some stomach issues but we had no idea she had cancer until the week after my dad died.
    wow-i'm so so sorry mflash.what a shock that must have been. yet i sit here wondering what the streams of water symbolized. did your dad see something that others didn't?

    again, please accept my heartfelt condolences.

    leslie
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    ...is the title of a great book written by hospice nurses that discuss experiences such as these. It was the first time that I saw it termed "Near Death Awareness." I truly believe in it and have witnessed similar experiences myself. I've been a hospice nurse for 4 years and know that when a pt starts to talk to "entities" not visible to us, or reaching out into thin air...death is near. Some pts become agitated (terminal agitation) and some pts experience an immediate calm. Those pts that I've witnessed with terminal agitation eventually experience that calm or peace. I have read & heard that pts near death see family members or loved ones that give them comfort when crossing over. As for your mom's experience, it seems that it was a stranger and she probably felt that she wasn't ready. When she gave you an early b'day present, she was finally ready. As far as my personal experience, my grandmother died in Oct 02. She did talk to family members that had passed 1-2 days before she died. On the day she died, she was unresponsive until minutes before she died. She suddenly opened her eyes, looked up and smiled. A few minutes later, she took her last breath. It was a great source of comfort for me (and my family) to see that she was happy going where she was going. You are not crazy! :-) ...check the book out!!
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    Quote from PumpkinsMami
    ...is the title of a great book written by hospice nurses that discuss experiences such as these. It was the first time that I saw it termed "Near Death Awareness." I truly believe in it and have witnessed similar experiences myself. I've been a hospice nurse for 4 years and know that when a pt starts to talk to "entities" not visible to us, or reaching out into thin air...death is near. Some pts become agitated (terminal agitation) and some pts experience an immediate calm. Those pts that I've witnessed with terminal agitation eventually experience that calm or peace. I have read & heard that pts near death see family members or loved ones that give them comfort when crossing over. As for your mom's experience, it seems that it was a stranger and she probably felt that she wasn't ready. When she gave you an early b'day present, she was finally ready. As far as my personal experience, my grandmother died in Oct 02. She did talk to family members that had passed 1-2 days before she died. On the day she died, she was unresponsive until minutes before she died. She suddenly opened her eyes, looked up and smiled. A few minutes later, she took her last breath. It was a great source of comfort for me (and my family) to see that she was happy going where she was going. You are not crazy! :-) ...check the book out!!
    As people get closer to actual death and begin to see people and things we cannot ("near death awareness) they often interpret that in ways unique to their own experience. Our language is based on our experiences in this world, but when we leave here, where we go is not of this world. Therefore people tend to speak of it in symbolic, or metaphorical terms. Dying people's comments are often difficult to interpret, but if you are familiar with their background you may be able to figure it out. I have heard dying people speak of catching a bus or train, crossing a river, crossing a canyon, riding in a truck & crossing a bridge or crossing a creek. Actually, I am contemplating putting together a book of near death awareness stories if anyone is interested in contributing.
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    My mother did this when she was dying. She too had metastatic breast ca. One day she asked me if I saw the lady sitting on the end of the bed with her. I told her that I did not and she began to explain in detail what she looked like. The next day she began talking to her mother. Her mother died 10 yrs previously. She kept saying "wait mother, Im coming", "i'll be there soon." Being a nurse it was amazing to watch.
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    Quote from CardioTrans
    My mother did this when she was dying. She too had metastatic breast ca. One day she asked me if I saw the lady sitting on the end of the bed with her. I told her that I did not and she began to explain in detail what she looked like. The next day she began talking to her mother. Her mother died 10 yrs previously. She kept saying "wait mother, Im coming", "i'll be there soon." Being a nurse it was amazing to watch.
    Did the experience you describe have any effect on your views about life and death? Or life after death?
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    Hello to everyone. I'm considering hospice nursing as a second career due to the high quality care my father received during his last hospitalization. He died July 19 of this year after being disabled for almost 23 years. He was in the hospital for almost 8 weeks; the last 24 hours of which was in the Hospice unit. During his hospitalization he "saw" a little boy on two different occasions. Dad had a brother who died in 1924 at age 5 of diptheria, and mom and I believed that it was Jack, coming to take Dad Home. The Friday before he died he was in and out of consciousness. As I sat at his bedside, I told him it was ok to go, that we would miss him, but I knew he was going to a better place. The following Tuesday night he died. Mom said that he sat straight up in the early afternoon and said, "Darling, I love you!" and then was in and out again. After we kids left, Mom told him that it was ok for him to go, as I had done. He died about an hour later.
    During my grief therapy group session, the counselor recommended the book Final Gifts by Maggie Callanan, Patricia Kelley, who were Hospice nurses. I saw that it was mentioned by another poster. This is an awesome book about near death awareness and I highly recommend it for anyone who deals with patient deaths. It has really been a comfort to me.
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    I'm getting chills going up and down my spine reading these posts. I can't count how many times I've had pts report this to me and families find it comforting to know that there will be someone to help their loved one cross over. I'm a hospice nurse who is currently on leave to care for my dying father and for me the thought that my mother will come when its his time (she died 1 1/2 yrs ago) gives me some peace.
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    I had a friend do the very same thing. i work in a Hospital. She was upstairs dying. The cleaning man came in. She told me to tell him to get out. I looked at him and said could you leave us alone for awhile. He said he was finished and left. She called me down in my office and said why don't u tell the people in the Hospital you know what you are doing lol. I laughed and said I would do that.The following morning she too was gone.
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    i truly respect and am changed by each patients death. i feel that its like having one foot in the natural world and the other foot in the supernatural. my faith has grown imensely in hospice and there has been many a 'holy' moment ('hospice moment') for which there are no words-only awe.
    this job is a real gift and blessing and the families can touch your heart when least expected.
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    There is an essay written by a hospice nurse about this very subject at the following URL...
    http://crossingthecreek.com/untold_treasures.htm
    You might find it interesting.

    It is forums such as this one that give hospice nurses the opportunity to talk about such things among themselves and not have to worry about being labeled weird or crazy. Oncalllorraine... you are absolutely correct in stating that hospice nurses have one foot in the natural world and the other in the supernatural world. For us, that is the norm. But how often have you tried talking about it with a non-hospice person and get a "Wow... what have you been smoking!" sort of look in response?


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