Hospice: What You Don't Know Can Hurt - page 4

I took a seat on the kitchen chair that the daughter brought in. Pulling it up to the double bed, I tried to get close to my patient, a woman nearing the end of her battle with gastric cancer. She... Read More

  1. by   mamasboy2
    I signed my mother into a nursing home and they basically "own" her now. I wanted to bring her home and was told she has to say she wants to vome, but she obviously can't. Then when I ask for power of attorney, they say no because she can't say she wants me to have it. So I'm stuck in a situation that I thought was something else and not really happy with.
  2. by   jeastridge
    I am so sorry about your situation. It might help to talk with an attorney. I hope things get better. Joy
  3. by   Wendy Lady
    What does a day in the life of a hospice nurse typically look like? How much time are you spending with patients and family per visit? Is there an orientation or training period for nurses new to hospice? Thank you.
  4. by   jeastridge
    Quote from Wendy Lady
    What does a day in the life of a hospice nurse typically look like? How much time are you spending with patients and family per visit? Is there an orientation or training period for nurses new to hospice? Thank you.
    Hi Wendy, As you may have discovered, "typical day" and "nursing" don't often get into the same sentence! But generally, hospice nurses work by going out into the homes and doing visits. Some visits are more routine and take less time and others become extended visits of several hours. When a patient is admitted to hospice, the initial visit usually runs about 2 hours. After that start up, the average visit is 45min to an hour. Full time hospice nurses have on call time, as well. There are also visits to nursing homes and other types of facilities where hospice patients live. Some hospices have hospice houses and a portion of their safe is dedicated to working there along with a few that are cross trained to work both in the hospice house and in the home. The nursing work in a hospice house more closely resembles inpatient care at a hospital but remains focused on symptom management and helping the whole family group. I hope this brief answer helps! I'm sure that in trying to be concise, I have left something out but this at least gives you some idea. Joy
  5. by   kimrn2018
    Thank you for this post. I am a new LPN - at the age of 53 😊 - and will start working on my BSN this fall. I know in my heart that I am supposed to be a hospice nurse. I am currently working as a floor nurse in a surgical care unit for some acute care experience. Is there any advice or pointers you would give to someone like me that is receiving this calling in a big way! Thank you!
  6. by   jeastridge
    Dear Wendy Lady, Partly in response to your article, I wrote a follow-up entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Hospice Nurse." I hope it is helpful to you. Joy
  7. by   jeastridge
    Quote from kimrn2018
    Thank you for this post. I am a new LPN - at the age of 53 ������ - and will start working on my BSN this fall. I know in my heart that I am supposed to be a hospice nurse. I am currently working as a floor nurse in a surgical care unit for some acute care experience. Is there any advice or pointers you would give to someone like me that is receiving this calling in a big way! Thank you!
    Hi Kim,
    All the experience you can gather up will be a help! Congrats on being an LPN and looking into the future as you plan on getting your BSN. Good job. You might consider talking with one or two hospice companies to let them know of your future interest. They might surprise you with work opportunities if you are a good fit for their particular needs at the time. At the very least you will be on their radar for future openings. Way to go! Joy
  8. by   MsPrettyHospiceRN
    I am a new hospice nurse of 10 months, and I am completely burned out. I love the job, but I feel like I am constantly working and have no support. Do you have any suggestions to make a career that I love be one that I can stay in without fizzling out?
  9. by   LVN fresno
    Hospice is so wonderful. My mother had hospice at the end of her life. I could not have given her the care she received with out their help. I will always be thankful for Hospice.
  10. by   jeastridge
    Quote from MsPrettyHospiceRN
    I am a new hospice nurse of 10 months, and I am completely burned out. I love the job, but I feel like I am constantly working and have no support. Do you have any suggestions to make a career that I love be one that I can stay in without fizzling out?
    I am sorry that I did not see your comment sooner! I hope you are still hanging in there with hospice. While all jobs have times of more and less stress, being "completely burned out" sounds like a situation that can't go on long term. There are two things to look at: 1. Is it your particular agency and the time/travel demands? or 2. Is it your personal work style?
    The approaches to coping with the two problems is different. I hope that you can find a mentor to talk with and narrow down some of the problems to get at the root cause. I want to encourage you to keep reaching out until you feel you have a more workable situation. Don't give up!
  11. by   jeastridge
    Quote from Wendy Lady
    What does a day in the life of a hospice nurse typically look like? How much time are you spending with patients and family per visit? Is there an orientation or training period for nurses new to hospice? Thank you.
    I hope you noticed that I used your idea to write a new article called, "A Day in the Life of a Hospice Nurse." Maybe it will give you more information and be helpful to you. All the best!

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