hospice nurse job duties

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    can some one please explain to me the job duties of a hospice nurse? what is a typical day working as a hospice nurse like?
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  4. 3
    My typical shift...(I work in a Hospice House)...count the narcs, get report, assess comfort n safety of my patients, plan my shift. We still do some wound care, have foleys, ports, G and J tubes, and the occasional IV or CADD pump patient. And there are the scheduled meds. My HHA are there alone for up to six pts. It may not sound like much, but all nurses know things can go south quickly and frequently. Also, family dynamics to deal with....lots of emotions all around with dying - including the staff! We really get attached to our patients. Oh...did I mention we do the cooking for those pts still eating? We are generally running most of the time. We are sent a lot of pts in crisis, poorly managed in the realm of death and comfort. One pt can tie you up for hours, while you chase their symptoms, the docs, the paperwork, family....but I love my job and wouldn't trade it for anything. Sorry to ramble. Hope it helps.
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    [QUOTE="Oh...did I mention we do the cooking for those pts still eating? [/QUOTE]

    That's crazy!
    kat7464 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from kat7464
    My typical shift...(I work in a Hospice House)...count the narcs, get report, assess comfort n safety of my patients, plan my shift. We still do some wound care, have foleys, ports, G and J tubes, and the occasional IV or CADD pump patient. And there are the scheduled meds. My HHA are there alone for up to six pts. It may not sound like much, but all nurses know things can go south quickly and frequently. Also, family dynamics to deal with....lots of emotions all around with dying - including the staff! We really get attached to our patients. Oh...did I mention we do the cooking for those pts still eating? We are generally running most of the time. We are sent a lot of pts in crisis, poorly managed in the realm of death and comfort. One pt can tie you up for hours, while you chase their symptoms, the docs, the paperwork, family....but I love my job and wouldn't trade it for anything. Sorry to ramble. Hope it helps.
    Hospice is a very demanding environment.
    There can be huge rewards.

    How large is the House?
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    Six pt bed facility. When we are full, it can be very demanding depending on acuity. When not so full, there is talk of closing, yet we meet such a huge need in our community of predominant elders.
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    Is there one RN for 6 patients?
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    Yes, when we are a full house, which is the goal! :-)
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    Wow great insight as I have wondered this myself, I really commend those working in this field as I think it would be particularly emotionally taxing.
  11. 0
    To the OP, most hospice nurses work in the field rather than in a hospice facility.
    More than 75% of all hospice care takes place in the patient/family home.
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    In the home setting, the CM is responsible in implementation of the total plan of care, this can vary according to state and policy guideline if working with a LPN or alone, generally you have some sort of support at least we do, but always start with on-call report, listen for your pt's names or pt in your general service area, Make F/U visit or phone call to all problem pt's (saves me time). the CM is responsible for docuenting any decline, changes to POC, meds, maintaining contact with SW regarding any psychosocial issues including family fatigue anxiety etc. He she would generally also set up CNA scheduling, IDT notes or changes, routine visits with pt's and meetings with facilities to discuss POC, admission, revocations, and D/C's, also pronouncement of death, LPN usually deal with above except changes to POC, (a least in Ga), + all the non job duties such as emotional support funeral visitations etc... pretty much everything you can think of that would be involved with managing a pt's care... hope this helps
    tewdles likes this.


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