Starting a non-skilled in home nursing franchise

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    Hello All:

    I am an electrial engineer by degree and experience but I want to become involved with the non-skilled stay-at-home caregivers business. I do not have any prior nursing experience but I am willing and very enthusiatic about gaining the education, training and clinical or field experience. My first motivation is an intense passion and desire to help people, My second motivation is to secure a future for myself and my wife who is a CNA with 20+ years of experience and I do have prior experience with running a small business. In researching what I can immediately bring to the table, I have noticed that there is a growing availability and need of technology based products that is targeted to the "aging-in-place" market; everything from medication reminder systems to "all-in-one" dedicated computers that monitor everything from client heartrate and respiration to making sure that the lights in the living room are turned off and notifying caregiveres if something is amiss. Given the growing need for this technology and from what I understand about the business so far, I think my IT / computer skills and some of my other experience will prove valuable. Does anyone out there have any experiece with starting one of these franchises? If so, I would like very much to know how you are doing with it and I am also seeking advice on what I need to do to get started. (Especially with marketing!)
  2. 3 Comments so far...

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    I worked closely with a gentleman starting senior care with a franchise. A franchise is always an option, but not necessary. I like your technology aspect. I haven't heard that before and I can see a market for that. I think you might be on to something that will make you different from the rest. Sorry I couldn't be of more help.
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    Hi, thanks for your response it was actually quite helpful! There is a growing need for technology in home healthcare and there are a few products out there that address some specific needs but I see lots of room for growth. I have an eye towards selling, applying and training caregivers and clients for using existing products and technology and I also have a few ideas of my own for developing new useful and possibly novel products and software. I am seeking advice on how I can enter this business and gain the personal contacts and practical experience I would need given that I do not *currently* have a background in medicine?
  5. 1
    Quote from nipri
    I have noticed that there is a growing availability and need of technology based products that is targeted to the "aging-in-place" market; everything from medication reminder systems to "all-in-one" dedicated computers that monitor everything from client heartrate and respiration to making sure that the lights in the living room are turned off and notifying caregiveres if something is amiss.
    I'll agree there is a growing availability of technology based products targeted to the aging-in-place market. But there really isn't a growing need.

    Technology based products for aging-in-place seniors work no better in the home than they do in facilities. By the time Mom or Dad need medication reminders, it's far too late for them to be helped by an automated pill minder. I'll argue that every senior doing well with an automated, computerized, $500 med reminder system would do just as well with a $4.99 plastic pill minder. The same goes for in-home proximity alarms, bed alarms, automatic lights, and a host of other aids.

    Seniors at risk for falls, wandering, and missed medication, manage to forget their pills, fall, and wander off from the best "tech advanced" facilities every day. Nothing beats a living breathing CNA visiting the home for a few hours a day (as your wife surely knows.)

    And no home care agency wants to sell seniors a one time item to replace staff. It's much more lucrative to bill staff hours than sell devices.

    You have an uphill battle bringing tech to home care.
    MBARNBSN likes this.


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