Starting a non-skilled in home nursing franchise Starting a non-skilled in home nursing franchise | allnurses

Starting a non-skilled in home nursing franchise

  1. 0 Hello All:

    I am an electrial engineer by degree and experience but I want to become involved with the non-skilled stay-at-home caregivers business. I do not have any prior nursing experience but I am willing and very enthusiatic about gaining the education, training and clinical or field experience. My first motivation is an intense passion and desire to help people, My second motivation is to secure a future for myself and my wife who is a CNA with 20+ years of experience and I do have prior experience with running a small business. In researching what I can immediately bring to the table, I have noticed that there is a growing availability and need of technology based products that is targeted to the "aging-in-place" market; everything from medication reminder systems to "all-in-one" dedicated computers that monitor everything from client heartrate and respiration to making sure that the lights in the living room are turned off and notifying caregiveres if something is amiss. Given the growing need for this technology and from what I understand about the business so far, I think my IT / computer skills and some of my other experience will prove valuable. Does anyone out there have any experiece with starting one of these franchises? If so, I would like very much to know how you are doing with it and I am also seeking advice on what I need to do to get started. (Especially with marketing!)
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. Visit  paradiseboundRN profile page
    #1 0
    I worked closely with a gentleman starting senior care with a franchise. A franchise is always an option, but not necessary. I like your technology aspect. I haven't heard that before and I can see a market for that. I think you might be on to something that will make you different from the rest. Sorry I couldn't be of more help.
  4. Visit  nipri profile page
    #2 0
    Hi, thanks for your response it was actually quite helpful! There is a growing need for technology in home healthcare and there are a few products out there that address some specific needs but I see lots of room for growth. I have an eye towards selling, applying and training caregivers and clients for using existing products and technology and I also have a few ideas of my own for developing new useful and possibly novel products and software. I am seeking advice on how I can enter this business and gain the personal contacts and practical experience I would need given that I do not *currently* have a background in medicine?
  5. Visit  CabanaDay profile page
    #3 3
    Quote from nipri
    I have noticed that there is a growing availability and need of technology based products that is targeted to the "aging-in-place" market; everything from medication reminder systems to "all-in-one" dedicated computers that monitor everything from client heartrate and respiration to making sure that the lights in the living room are turned off and notifying caregiveres if something is amiss.
    I'll agree there is a growing availability of technology based products targeted to the aging-in-place market. But there really isn't a growing need.

    Technology based products for aging-in-place seniors work no better in the home than they do in facilities. By the time Mom or Dad need medication reminders, it's far too late for them to be helped by an automated pill minder. I'll argue that every senior doing well with an automated, computerized, $500 med reminder system would do just as well with a $4.99 plastic pill minder. The same goes for in-home proximity alarms, bed alarms, automatic lights, and a host of other aids.

    Seniors at risk for falls, wandering, and missed medication, manage to forget their pills, fall, and wander off from the best "tech advanced" facilities every day. Nothing beats a living breathing CNA visiting the home for a few hours a day (as your wife surely knows.)

    And no home care agency wants to sell seniors a one time item to replace staff. It's much more lucrative to bill staff hours than sell devices.

    You have an uphill battle bringing tech to home care.
  6. Visit  sjbmrn profile page
    #4 1
    Just came across your post...wondering how it is going for you? The owners of the nonskilled company I work for (as nursing director of care) started about the same time you did. I would love to communicate with you and pick your brain ....thanks!
  7. Visit  RN In FL profile page
    #5 0
    Quote from nipri
    Hello All:

    I am an electrial engineer by degree and experience but I want to become involved with the non-skilled stay-at-home caregivers business. I do not have any prior nursing experience but I am willing and very enthusiatic about gaining the education, training and clinical or field experience. My first motivation is an intense passion and desire to help people, My second motivation is to secure a future for myself and my wife who is a CNA with 20+ years of experience and I do have prior experience with running a small business. In researching what I can immediately bring to the table, I have noticed that there is a growing availability and need of technology based products that is targeted to the "aging-in-place" market; everything from medication reminder systems to "all-in-one" dedicated computers that monitor everything from client heartrate and respiration to making sure that the lights in the living room are turned off and notifying caregiveres if something is amiss. Given the growing need for this technology and from what I understand about the business so far, I think my IT / computer skills and some of my other experience will prove valuable. Does anyone out there have any experiece with starting one of these franchises? If so, I would like very much to know how you are doing with it and I am also seeking advice on what I need to do to get started. (Especially with marketing!)
    Why on earth would you want to become "involved" with this industry? Is it because you were promised a high return for your investment, as a franchisee?? Home care is the "hottest investment going right now? How much involvement are you going to "involve" yourself? That is the "selling" point with these Franchisor's in attracting people with a lot capital to put down. The selling point they tell investors, with no medical background, ..." If you have an intense passion to help people".., you can do this. C'mon now. That is how they tell you to respond to people who ask you the question, "how on earth did you become involved in the patient care industry, from electrical engineer.

    Well let me just say, It takes more than a passion. BrightStar, CareMinders, and the rest of them all seem like a muti-level marketing fraud to me, by encouraging people, like yourself with NO EXPERIENCE TO GET INVOLVED. You end up paying them a whole fee and the likes. How do I know?

    I am the Director of Nursing at a home health agency, who was once CareMinders. THE FRANCHISEE, the owners, who bought into the business, felt they were scammed, due to promises, Careminders was not keeping. Left them out to dry. He and his wife left the franchise, became independent. He went through 5 DON's, before he hired me from 2013-2015. His background? Pharmacy rep. Her background, Nuclear Med. They call that "healthcare". I think not.

    It is very frustrating to work in that office everyday. They are "hands on", meaning they are in the office....helping oversee their business investment. I am saying all that to say this.

    It takes more than just a passion to "help people" to get into the home health business, NOT UNLESS, you are going to be in the background, handleing the contracts and the likes. You must let the people you hire run the company. They know nothing about staffing, have no idea how to deal with physicians....orders, level of care. Its all dollars he see, and trying to recoup the money he has invested.

    I did not know the history, when I got hired, I figured a home health agency. I will never work for private owners again, ESPECIALLY, if they want to "help out in the office", have no medical background, and want to micro-manage a seasoned RN of 32 years with 10+ years of home health exerience. This agency is a Medicaid only, offering skilled care to commercial insurance, work comp, and private pay. CareMinder's investors had them thinking they would at least make a 500k profit/yr within 2 years of going into business.

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