Home Health

  1. I am intrested in hearing from anyone who has done home health care. I am thinking about switching from my current job on a med/surg floor to home health. I have two and a half years of expirence. If anyone has anything to share about home health I loved to hear from you!
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   chachh
    Hi!

    I worked in home health/hospice dept as a secretary for 7 years before getting my rn. Though never did the clinical aspect I think I have a pretty good idea about what is involved in this california area. At our facility the nurses would get a load of about 6-8 patients to see a day. Could be follow-up from dc from acute setting, or monthly foley change. could be for ab needed to be infused or wound dsg changes. There are case nurses at the office that would be the contact person for dr calls and orders. Your milage is reimbursed at a pro-rated rate. It is much more layed back then floor nursing but can be very busy. Some people love it, some hate it. Hope this helps.
  4. by   luvdaisy
    I recommend Home Health to any nurse that I meet that is thinking about changing jobs. I love it. I normally see 30-40 patients a week. I may be doing anything from giving a B12 shot or drawing blood to accessing a port for an IgG infusion. There is a lot of teaching, but the agency I work for has books that can be given to patients to help us teach them about their DM, CAD, CHF, etc. I get paid per visit and for mileage. Of course you make more for admissions and after hours and on weekends. I very rarely have to see a patient after 5:00 and honestly am usually finished seeing patients by 3:00. The paperwork can be overwhelming at times but probably not any worse than what you do at the hospital. The admission paperwork takes the longest, but once you get used to it, it isnt so bad. We are going to computers soon so the paperwork will be eliminated. I really like the flexibility of the job and just being out on my own. I have a lot of precious patients that always make me have a better day.
  5. by   jnette
    Quote from zhlk1
    I recommend Home Health to any nurse that I meet that is thinking about changing jobs. I love it. I normally see 30-40 patients a week. I may be doing anything from giving a B12 shot or drawing blood to accessing a port for an IgG infusion. There is a lot of teaching, but the agency I work for has books that can be given to patients to help us teach them about their DM, CAD, CHF, etc. I get paid per visit and for mileage. Of course you make more for admissions and after hours and on weekends. I very rarely have to see a patient after 5:00 and honestly am usually finished seeing patients by 3:00. The paperwork can be overwhelming at times but probably not any worse than what you do at the hospital. The admission paperwork takes the longest, but once you get used to it, it isnt so bad. We are going to computers soon so the paperwork will be eliminated. I really like the flexibility of the job and just being out on my own. I have a lot of precious patients that always make me have a better day.

    Agree 100 % with all the above. Average 5-7 patients per day. Usually in one local area, catching the last ones on my way home. Rural setting (the BEST!) I'm usually home by 1pm, sometimes sooner. I'm at my first patients' house by 0800. We too, are getting laptops somewhere down the line.. wish it were YESTERDAY !

    To me, this is what nursing is all about. So much variety, teaching, personal hands on care, and bonding with your patients. No docs screaming or managers breathing down your back. Lovely scenery to soothe the soul. Music as you drive, coffee to go. This is Nursing Heaven.
  6. by   SWRN84
    I have been working in home care for 19 years....staff nurse, case manager, supervisor, now am working prn 4 days per week. Home health is a great place for a nurse to really develop different skills and is truly what nursing is all about. Your patients generally love you and rely on your visits and teaching. The pros are as mentioned: one on one care, developing close relationships with your patients and families, feeling like you really do make a difference. Cons: on call...weekends can be hairy depending on the size of your agency and how many nurses take call at one time; paperwork....very much paperwork which can be overwhelming to learn and incorporate into your daily care of patients. You have to be able to utilize your thinking skills, have great assessment skills, and also be able to perform independently. Many patients come home sicker....we see everything.....you will have post surgery patients requiring dressing changes/staple/suture removal.....blood draws, port/central line access, tube feedings, vent patients, iv infusions/pca infusions....just about anything you can think of and have to learn to manage those independently. There is much teaching involved in home care and you have to involve caregivers as much as possible to try and get these patients back as independent as possible. It's a whole different type of nursing, and I do believe you either love it or hate it....there's usually not a whole lot of in between, but like any other nursing position, it takes a good year to feel comfortable.
  7. by   PamSICURN
    I agree with all the above. I wouldn't do anything else!!!! Pam
  8. by   trailblazer59
    Quote from krocks0610
    I am intrested in hearing from anyone who has done home health care. I am thinking about switching from my current job on a med/surg floor to home health. I have two and a half years of expirence. If anyone has anything to share about home health I loved to hear from you!
    I have over 20+ years in home health in the Mass. area. The job requires someone who loves teaching, is good at organizing and has a head for geographic mapping, not afraid of driving in the elements (snow, rain, hail, whatever), and has a fairly good handle on major adult diseases (HTN, CHF, Diabetes, PVD, ie.). Oh yes, you are required to complete a good amount of documentation, especially when a patient is admitted. The Medicaire guildelines require the completion of something called an "oasis" which maps the details of a patient's medical and physical background and ADL skills.
    But despite this, there is a great deal of satisfaction in caring for a patient along with their family's help, and watching them progress with your teaching and the help other interdisciplinary staff: the P.T., O.T., Speech therapist, etc. You will usually be required to visit 6 pts. daily, perhaps with one of these a new admit (takes about 1-1.75 hrs. to do the visit). You will be expected on occaision to complete venipuncture for collection of CBC, P.T./INR (now using small machines similar to glucometers, so easy), obtain a urine for UA/CVS.

    I advise you to go for it! Home care nurses are now very much in demand
  9. by   Wgbem
    I agree with all the other posters. I have been a nurse for 18 years but in home care for 3 1/2 years. I love it. I have the most flexibility that I have had in any job (I have done everything from hospital to research to management). I have teen girls and hubby travels a great deal but I am able to be there for their activities and sleep in my bed every night. Paper work can be a lot but still worth it compared to a full 8 hour day.

    I say every nurse should do home care in their career. That seems to balance the whole career of nursing.

    Regards.

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