Calling all HH Nurses, roll call - page 32

Hi, as a newly appointed moderator, I want to live this forum up a bit. I just resigned my position as a HH supervisor, to go back to the field. I have been a nurse 20 years, 17 in critical care,... Read More

  1. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Federal Medicare and state medicaid regulations permit only RN's to perform OASIS assessments.
    That's what I thought, but the LPN in Texas wrote that she is swamped with paperwork, and I don't think regular charting of her services given are that copious, compared to that RNs have to do.......
  2. by   iluvivt
    I work 3 days in the hospital and 2-3 days doing home health. They are so different and I love them both. I find that i get more attached to my home care pts...and often since I am often doing long infusions I get to really do a good assessment and some fun teaching, It is sometimes shocking to see the gaps in our health care system.
  3. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from iluvivt
    I work 3 days in the hospital and 2-3 days doing home health. They are so different and I love them both. I find that i get more attached to my home care pts...and often since I am often doing long infusions I get to really do a good assessment and some fun teaching, It is sometimes shocking to see the gaps in our health care system.
    As large as the gap you see in insured/government funded patients, can you imagine what happens to those who have no coverage? Anyone who owns property (including one's own home, which is preserved in bankruptcies), a car, money in a savings account (I forget how much), or earns more than a skimpy amount at poverty level (long outdated by the rise in consumer and business costs) is not eligible for hospitalization or HH care. Whatever happened to "coop" food markets?

    When the collection companies and banks dispoense of their assets, those folks are homeless (eligible for assistance and government subsidized healthcare). But they are essentially homeless and hapless as the waiting lists for government housing, are usually endless, and as they wait their diseases become much worse.

    They may not know where free clinics are, or are too stubborn/proud to attend them. Their mental health and immunity erodes, until they die a preventable death, given the earlier diagnosis they had; and far earlier in life than others of their ilk, without the pain relief street savvy drug addicts may have.

    We must elect officials who are dedicated to the provision of healthcare to all!! The most cost effective, being "single payer" programs, subtracting high cost insurance companies from the scene.
  4. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from tricia0424
    hi! I need advice. For almost 2 months I'm working in a government hospital as an OR Nurse, also my part time job is Home Health. I'm planning to give my work as an OR nurse and just be full time Homehealth nurse. Is that a good decision?? please advice..what are the advantages and disadvantages of working as a full time homehealth?

    Tricia
    I have worked part time for several HH agencies at the same time, and also in hospital. It's exhausting to switch roles and charting regulations of each place. I understand why you'd want to simplify your professional life.

    However, in the 20+ years that I've done that, HH agencies have far more unbenefited work for those willing/able to do it. Since I am divorced, I depend on my own healthcare insurance coverage. If you are married to someone who prvides that, HH full time could work, as long as your marriage does. You may have to work for different agencies at the same time to maintain the income you've had, which may be necessary to maintain......... raises are less reliable when you're "per diem", so keep that in mind. (I remember working from 8 AM to 9PM, and trying to get as many cases as I could, to keep my income up).

    Best of luck............
  5. by   boozenurse
    just found this site and i am very excited!!! now when i have questions or needs ya'll may be able to help me. i have been in hh for 1 year now. its my part-time job. full time job is hospice. prior to that i worked med-surg for 5 yrs. if i want to ask a question, pls refresh my memory, how do i do that?:wink2:
  6. by   annaedRN
    Hello and welcome! To ask a question, just click on the new thread button near the top of whatever forum you would like to post in (of course, my favorite would be HH nursing ) and ask away. It's just about the same as replying to a question. Of course, coming up with a catchy title/subject may help you get people's interest, but I think most of the regulars read all the new posts..especially in their particular specialty
    Last edit by annaedRN on Apr 17, '08 : Reason: afterthoughts...
  7. by   vicky1964
    I have been working in Home Health for 6 years In Texas , I love it, I love everything about it, Its very rewarding. The freedom is great and the money is even better.:heartbeat
  8. by   Cora Zone
    Hi,

    I am in home health now for four months, but only a little over two years in nursing as a whole. I think my lack of experience makes it hard to do this well. What am I good at? Well the patients love me. That and a dollar will get you a small cup of Joe at Dunkin Donuts. They say I am good because I don't rush in and out like the other nurses. It's the whole " hustle for the visits" mentality that really makes me feel bad about this job. I feel like I am working piecework in a garment shop. Then after 8 or more hours in the field, I come home to piles of paperwork and searching the internet for good educational materials. And doing phone calls, and..and--then I toss and turn and can't sleep, I am so worried about these people. One thing I believe is really needed are written handouts that are readable and simple, with lots of pictures, on all the basic diseases we run into...if anyone has any ideas on that, please--I am open to any of them, including how to not burn out again on my third nursing job in two years. I sit there in the houses, drawing pictures, because I can't find what I want for teaching. Good to find this forum. I'll be checking back, for sure.
  9. by   YogaloverRN
    Hello everyone,
    I am new to HH only been in for 2.5 months now. WOW, do I feel stupid. I worked on orthopedic/urology/gen surgery floor for 12 years, didn't do much medical nursing, then did 2 years as circulator in ENT/GYN suite. Took 6 years off to raise kids etc. Now the last 2.5 years in Pain Management doing venipuncture and conscious sedation. This seems to be a very rewarding type of nursing but gosh, I can't seem to remember EVERYTHING
  10. by   YogaloverRN
    OOPs sorry, new to this site and can't quite get this right either, LOL. Anyway any advice for how to slow down and still see 6-7 patients like they want me to and do it RIGHT too? I feel so inadequate and the other girls say it will take up to a year to get it? Gosh, I can't wait that long! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
  11. by   Silverblitzen
    Quote from yogalover47
    OOPs sorry, new to this site and can't quite get this right either, LOL. Anyway any advice for how to slow down and still see 6-7 patients like they want me to and do it RIGHT too? I feel so inadequate and the other girls say it will take up to a year to get it? Gosh, I can't wait that long! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
    OMmmmmmmmmmmmmmm....deep, cleansing breath. That's it, sloooooowly. Patience is your friend, Grasshopper. (Boy, now I'm really dating myself!) All your fellow staff members were once newbies as well and had to go through that awkward, gangly stage. Can you communicate with your team members if you have questions? I'm finding that I'm asking questions all the time and I also have a problem with patience - I wanna know it all NOW! But....the wiser, older part of me tells me that it will all come with experience. Someone on here has a wonderful signature line, something like 'With experience comes mistakes. It is through mistakes we gain experience' (or something akin to that - apologies to the original owner). Knowing my own shortcomings, that is something I try to keep in mind. Above all, be patient with yourself. Take the time with your clients, ask a lot of questions, be organized, and you'll do fine. Let us know how it goes!

    Best,
    Sue
  12. by   catfish1
    Hi. I'm a new RN but an LPN for 15 yrs. I've been offered a job with VNA here in Florida. Since this is my first HH job, is VNA a nice agency? I'd appreciate any feedback. Thanks.:wink2:
  13. by   annaedRN
    I work for the VNA in PA and I love it! WHile there is no such thing as a perfect agency, I have found that the non-profit status helps. While the goal is to make money, my agency tends to focus on the quality of care not the quantity of patients admitted. I hear alot of stories about agencies giving grief to nurses who discharge or refuse to admit a patient for various reasons. I do not experience any of that. My patient load for a day is usually between 4-6 ( admissions counting as 2 visits). Just make sure that you get a thorough orientation to the OASIS - it is probably the most important and time consuming thing you will need to learn. Just ask alot of questions. I hope that you will have the same experiences and environment that I have at work!

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