Calling all HH Nurses, roll call - page 17

Hi, as a newly appointed moderator, I want to live this forum up a bit. I just resigned my position as a HH supervisor, to go back to the field. I have been a nurse 20 years, 17 in critical care,... Read More

  1. by   hoolahan
    Welcome to all the newcomers! Good to see you here!

    Heather, some interesting food for thought there!
  2. by   Trailblazer
    Hello!

    I am a HH RN and am so glad to find this forum! I live in Ne Wisconsin, and have been in HH for over 4 years. We use laptops for our charting, using a program called PTCT. It has certainly made the paperwork a lot easier Recently, I became a Case Manager. I no longer make visits, but develop the POC, and among other details, ensure we are in complicance. It is different, but I enjoy it. I hope to get to know others on this thread. I think HH is misunderstood by other nurses etc. Prior to HH, I worked in ICU's, PACU, and Same day surgery. I love HH!!!

    Donna
  3. by   kbettencourt
    I have been a HH Nurse only for 9 Mths, In my Agency our productivity expected is 6 patients daily, and 30 pts weekly. My case load is 25-32 patients. We have Admission Nurses during the week. We do our own admissions on weekends worked. Only once a month is required. We do our own blood draws and deliver to the labs, IV, Wound care, What ever the Patient comes home with we are responsible to care for. Except Dialysis.
    Lots of Paper work as you know, 485's, Oasis, Recerts, Discharges are all our repsonsibilities. We do all documentation on computers. It's a love hate relationship. I hope in the future there is more patient care than paper work.
  4. by   Chuckie4424
    Quote from hoolahan
    Hello lpnandloveit1 and lynanv! Since I have some peds backgraound, in the open heart sicu only, they keep trying to get me to do peds at work. Where I am now, peds is very depressing, to me anyway. We do visits, and soooo many of these kids end up referred to DYFS (Div Youth & family sevices in NJ) for neglect and abuse. I feel partly guilty for not doing it, making a difference, but I also know I'd be crying every day.

    God Bless those who do peds!! You are special people!
    I have done many types of nursing over the last 30 plus years. Home Health has been the most rewarding. So sorry that the government supports the massive paperwork and we as nurses let it happen. I wonder how many nurses ended up leaving Home Health due to hand injury? Bless all of you nurses that remain in the field.

    I'm seeking insight about how to set my own hours and minimum paperwork
    while working part time. I do so miss the lovely connections I have had with
    patients in their homes! Mentoring professionals and non professional in home health is of interest to me. I have fellow nurse friends who are dynamic in their work in pediatrics and use of the vents.

    Likewise: Good bless them!:kiss
    Chuckie4424
  5. by   clueless researcher
    Hello,
    My name is Jen and I am a health researcher who is conducting a study on blood exposure of home health nurses. I have one major problem, I am not a nurse and have no clue about the field. I figured who best hear from than you all. So where do I start??? I am currently trying to figure out how to work the state board of nursing licening database. Based on my limited knowledge, home health nurses can be employed by a variety of employers (hospitals, health departments, hospices, HH agencies, etc). Some states ask your employment setting during relicensure (I don't even know if that is a word). I am trying to figure out how h.h. nurses answer the employment setting question. Can someone help me? Basically, if you work for a hospital but did home health nursing would you select a hospital or home care as employment setting?

    Another questions: can home health nurses work for themselves? Or do you have to work for an employeer (hospital, hh agency, etc).

    thanks in advance for anyone who will take the time to help me. As my screen name says, I am clueless.
  6. by   bpowers
    I started working in home health as a CNA during nursing school and loved it. A little over a year ago I finished a two year run working on a home vent case one night a week extra to help me save money for my wedding. My only real experience doing HH as a nurse has been this private duty vent case. I do feel that working as a CNA really exposed me to what it is like to do several visits with patients daily.

    After 6 1/2 years in the hospital I decided to take a weekend position doing HHC and try to get back into a field that I feel really fit with me. I'm excited to start getting to know some of the HH nurses who have been on the board a while. I feel like this new weekend position will be ideal for me.
    I've been in critical care the last 4 years and haven't let go completely (I'm staying on PRN)....I've been working 3 12's a week for so long I can't even imagine what it's going to be like working just 2 days/week. Also, I've been a night shift person since I started at the hospital so I just can't wait to have a more normal schedule with more family time.

    The job I accepted is 7 out of 8 weekends. 7a-7p.....computerized charting, mileage reimbursement, 6-8 visits per day.......I'm so excited and hope to learn as much as possible from all of you.
  7. by   ksnurse58
    Happy New Year!
    I am so glad to see all the Home Health nurses, I have been checking out some of the threads. I have been in HH for almost 2 years, and really love it. Looking forward to reading more, and getting to know ya!
    Sandy
  8. by   alintanurse
    Quote from clueless researcher
    Hello,
    My name is Jen and I am a health researcher who is conducting a study on blood exposure of home health nurses. I have one major problem, I am not a nurse and have no clue about the field. I figured who best hear from than you all. So where do I start??? I am currently trying to figure out how to work the state board of nursing licening database. Based on my limited knowledge, home health nurses can be employed by a variety of employers (hospitals, health departments, hospices, HH agencies, etc). Some states ask your employment setting during relicensure (I don't even know if that is a word). I am trying to figure out how h.h. nurses answer the employment setting question. Can someone help me? Basically, if you work for a hospital but did home health nursing would you select a hospital or home care as employment setting?

    Another questions: can home health nurses work for themselves? Or do you have to work for an employeer (hospital, hh agency, etc).

    thanks in advance for anyone who will take the time to help me. As my screen name says, I am clueless.
    jan, I have been a home health nurse for eleven years,I worked for an agency that was part of the hospital network but I always put down Home Health Nurse as my profession/home health setting.I don't know any HHnurses who work for themselves as there are state requirements re: Home Health licensing since you are providing direct pt. care.Maybe where you need to start is with the infectious disease dept. as they usually handle aftermath of needlesticks along with the employee health dept. of the organizations you know--contact them re; their protocol on handling needlesticks. I hope this is helpful!
  9. by   joan111101
    I having been doing HH care for nine months - I love HH - you are able to spend time with your patients - I like that I am able to give my patients undivided attention - the staff gives great moral surport and management available 24/7 - HH the greatest work I have worked-
  10. by   jnong
    I do Home Health in Jefferson Co, AL. What company do you work for??

    Hi, I am a home health psychiatric nurse in Baldwin County, AL. We are the only agency in south east AL that offers psych service. We are certified in psyche nursing and are approved by HCFA in Washington before we can make field visits.
    Our productivity is mandated at 4 visits per day, but we see about 23 per week. Sometimes we do our own admissions, but occaisionaly, the admisssion nurse can hep us out. I drive about 60 miles a day which is a change from the 100 miles a day I used to drive. Even though our specialty is psych, we are expected to do all the care our patients need, including wound care, PEG tubes, As case managers, we have about 24 patients each at this time. There are only 2 field nurses in our county and we cover ALL of it!!!!!!!!!!
    Besides my own caseload, I also co-manage with Hospice on many of their cases. We have found this to be extremely beneficial for the patent and family. It certainly helps with the continuity of care.
    I'd like to hear from other home health nurses, especially those in psych.
    Georgia[[/QUOTE]
  11. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Hi Jnong, welcome to allnurses you are going to love it. I have to ask you about psyche hh. I have had 2 pts. in my hh career and they realyy freaked me out. Both were men, but they just stared and followed me way too closely. One man had his son there caring for him but went outside while I attempted to educate him on his meds.The other was a new pt. and I guess the R.N. case manager, didn't realize he was a psyche pt. He lived alone.He was soooo strange. I called in to the office and reported his very strange behavior. He had a suitcase by the door but wouldn't let me look in it. Wouldn't answer questions would kinda stare at me. Well long story short that evening after the cna & I left this poor little man walked with his suitcase 12 miles to the airport, got a ticket and was on a plane to texas to see his dying wife. The flight attendant thought he was totally inappropiate acting, called security and he was put in a psyche unit for a week until his daughter could come take responsibilityfor him. Meanwhile his wife did die in Texas while he was in the psyche unit. The whole story was just as sad as could be. He had alzheimers and I can't remember what else. Anyway I have always been very interested in psyche nursing, but those two cases scared me to death, literally. Do u get pts. like that and how do u handle them? As far as my pt. went I documented very well and called my supervisor and our DON so I was covered but it tripped me and the cna out.
    Last edit by Hairstylingnurse on Jan 5, '05
  12. by   1angie
    Hi nurse karen,
    I am currently working as a private in home caregiver. In 1989 I ewnt to a non accredited school for a MA certificate. After being away from nursing for several years I wanted to go back to nursing in some capasity. Since it has been so long since I have been in the field I was unable to gain employment in a office or hospital so I signed up with a Home Health care agency and started taking clients mainly elderly people who basicly neede house cleaning or errands ran. That was fine but I felt I had more to offer. I was sent to a family who had a SCI case. I really took to the care required. Felt I was tappping into my talents and passion more. The pay was horrible at the agency so I considered quiting. the family I was working for wanted to hire me privately so they bought out my contract with the agency and hired me for double the pay. Now I am working with another family with a SCI case privately. I see some advantages for working for self but alot of disadvantages. Any advice out there. I want to stick with working with SCI patients and would like to market myself as Specializing in the care of SCI patients.
  13. by   1angie
    Self emploment Hi jen, I am not sure if it is legal but I am working for myself as a private in home care giver. The agencys pay was horrible. I am specifically marketing my self as a SCI caregiver. I have two clients but there are downfalls. No benifits, not paying into social security and taxes. I also need to know if I need to do anything to cover me legally, but for now I am doing status quoe. I liken it to babysitting. As far as the legalitys go. You can babysit with out a special license. Although I do invasive procedure like cath care and bowel programs and I administer oral meds.
    Quote from clueless researcher
    Hello,
    My name is Jen and I am a health researcher who is conducting a study on blood exposure of home health nurses. I have one major problem, I am not a nurse and have no clue about the field. I figured who best hear from than you all. So where do I start??? I am currently trying to figure out how to work the state board of nursing licening database. Based on my limited knowledge, home health nurses can be employed by a variety of employers (hospitals, health departments, hospices, HH agencies, etc). Some states ask your employment setting during relicensure (I don't even know if that is a word). I am trying to figure out how h.h. nurses answer the employment setting question. Can someone help me? Basically, if you work for a hospital but did home health nursing would you select a hospital or home care as employment setting?

    Another questions: can home health nurses work for themselves? Or do you have to work for an employeer (hospital, hh agency, etc).

    thanks in advance for anyone who will take the time to help me. As my screen name says, I am clueless.

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