IV Chelation/Vitamins and Ozone Therapy in Integrative Clinic

  1. I started working at an integrative clinic and am wondering what you all think of IV chelation/vitamins and Ozone IV therapy? I have never learned about them in school and the ND states that all I need to do is to follow their protocol on compounding and IV rates for these treatments. I don't know what resource to go to. My question then is that, if anything happens, would my license be in jeopardy if I am following protocol set up by the clinic? And for those who have experience in giving these treatments, how do you make sure you are giving safe treatments?

    Before I give medications that I have never given before, I always consult Davis Drug Guide. So not having this resource puts me in a really tough spot. Are there any drug guides for alternative medicine?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   lhflanurseNP
    If you are NOT prescribing, but only following the "orders" and the protocols set up by the physicians and the clinic, AND you use your nursing skills to assess for complications (fluid overload, reactions, etc) this would be no different than doing IV antibiotics, chemotherapy, etc in a "traditional" setting.
  4. by   meanmaryjean
    Be VERY careful. Non-FDA approved? Steer clear.
  5. by   elkpark
    IV chelation therapy to treat what? There have been a lot of frauds pushing chelation therapy for all kinds of phony indications. One physician in my area lost his license and went to prison over the death of a child who he was treating with IV chelation.

    If you're concerned about your license, I would encourage you to contact your BON and ask them about the practices at your place of employment
  6. by   nutria
    I never prescribe. I am only following protocol and doctor's orders.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from nutria
    I started working at an integrative clinic and am wondering what you all think of IV chelation/vitamins and Ozone IV therapy? I have never learned about them in school and the ND states that all I need to do is to follow their protocol on compounding and IV rates for these treatments.
    Quote from nutria
    I never prescribe. I am only following protocol and doctor's orders.
    Do you really want to stake your licensure and future career on legal advice you're getting from an ND? What does this individual know (or care) about the ins and outs of nursing licensure?

    "Even" the MDs I've known over the years would never tell an RN that s/he can't get in trouble for following the MDs orders or protocols.

    Were you not told in nursing school that you are responsible for your own practice and can be held accountable for following orders or giving medications/treatments that are dangerous or incorrect, and we are responsible for questioning physician's orders if they appear to be wrong or dangerous? How are you going to know what orders you should question or hesitate to administer if you are unfamiliar with the treatments, and many of them may be unapproved and undocumented?

    If you want to continue in this setting, I would strongly encourage you to clarify with your BON or professional liability insurance provider what your professional, legal exposure is in this situation.
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    I failed to note that this was an ND (I misread it as MD).
    Run away!

    And do some reading about the ND 'education'. You'll be frightened- I know I was.
  9. by   Creamsoda
    You are at a quackery clinic. I seriously would run the other way.
  10. by   nutria
    Oh my goodness. Thank you all. I submitted my letter of resignation and they have been kind of hounding me to stay and sending me proof that what they are doing is legal...
  11. by   lhflanurseNP
    I too misread the ND for MD...too quick sometimes. There are 20 states that license NDs as physicians however each state has it's own licensing board for NDs and it would depend on the scope of practice. Without knowing more....
  12. by   elkpark
    Quote from nutria
    Oh my goodness. Thank you all. I submitted my letter of resignation and they have been kind of hounding me to stay and sending me proof that what they are doing is legal...
    Sure, lots of irresponsible, unproven treatments are "legal" -- until something goes wrong. The physician in my area who was treating a child with chelation therapy for autism and killed the child wasn't doing anything "illegal" -- until the child died, and then he lost his license, was sued by the family for wrongful death, and was charged by the state with involuntary manslaughter.
  13. by   nutria
    That's awful. But I wonder why these treatments are being offered if they are unproven. Shouldn't these treatments be tightly regulated and not be offered to the general public if they are not FDA approved?
  14. by   elkpark
    Quote from nutria
    That's awful. But I wonder why these treatments are being offered if they are unproven. Shouldn't these treatments be tightly regulated and not be offered to the general public if they are not FDA approved?
    Next time you're in your local grocery store, Wal-Mart, or CVS, check out the vitamin/supplement aisle. None of those medications are FDA approved or regulated in any way, and some of them can be dangerous. There are people in Congress who make sure that the non-"mainstream" treatments and supplements remain unregulated.

    And the chelating agents used in these clinics are FDA approved and appropriate, legitimate treatment for specific indications (removing heavy metals from the body) -- but there are a lot of quacks out there using them for other purposes.
    Last edit by elkpark on Feb 20

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