Brain storm with me. - page 2

by Mudwoman 14,151 Views | 24 Comments

I have been interested in Holistic Nursing for a long time. The American Holistic Nurses Asso touts themselves as the only "official" certifying entity, and in the past, you had to have a bachelor degree and be a RN to even... Read More


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    Olof, I wrote you a grand reply then my browser froze and I lost it

    anyway. I'll write short version of my previous post.

    Holistic nurses may integrate complementary/alternative modalities (CAM) into clinical practice to treat people’s physiological, psychological, and spiritual needs. Doing so does not negate the validity of conventional medical therapies, but serves to complement, broaden, and enrich the scope of nursing practice and to help individuals access their greatest healing potential. http://www.ahna.org/AboutUs/WhatisHo...5/Default.aspx


    a few ideas for nurses would be:

    "Chronic Pain Therapy" = This can be made into a holistic model.

    "Mielu Therapy" = Insurance pays for this mental health treatment and it is very broad. That could be anything that is relaxing.

    I would also like to add that I went to a lady in CA. 2 years ago that had a doctor write prescriptions but she got to do all the complementary stuff. The doctor was cool with it. The patients just paid cash. For a few hundred a month she provided a long list of treatments to complement the doctor's orders. She wasn't even a RN! She was giving me all kinds of nutritional advice and I must say, she really helped me with my digestive disorders by suggesting probiotics. She lost me at "The earth's axis is off" as the reason. If she had not made a comment like that I may have went back.

    Here is a list of types of holistic therapies I found:
    Acupressure
    Aromatherapy
    Ayurvedic Medicine
    Bach Flower Remedies
    beginning Svaroopa Yoga therapy
    Body-Mind Counseling
    Breath Work
    Chronic Pain Management
    Counseling /Psychotherapy
    Crystal/Gem Therapy
    Detoxification
    Dream Therapy
    Energy Work
    Essential Oils
    Guided Imagery
    guided meditation
    Herbology
    Holistic Nurse Consultant
    Intent Technique
    Interactive Imagery
    Jin Shin Do Acupressure Body-Mind Therapy
    life-style coaching
    Meditation
    Neuro-Linguistic Programming
    Nutritional Counseling
    Orthomolecular Medicine
    Reiki
    Relaxation Consulting
    Stress Management
    Therapuetic Touch
    Trigger Point/ Myotherapy
    Visualization
    Yoga Therapy
    bella201, Underoo, and chwcbesteph like this.
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    I am glad to see that this post is still being read. Since I first posted, I have been researching several avenues. The most promising thing I'm working on is Diabetes Educator. I joined AADE and there is a world of information and help there. Once your diabetes education program is certified, you are able to bill Medicare and the fees work out to about $400 per year per patient net after expenses. There is a fee Medicare pays for 2 group teaching sessions and then up to 10 individual sessions per year. Fees vary by state. It is my understanding that rural areas are especially targeted to develop a diabetes education program. I am still working on getting something going in my area. I am in the state of Arkansas, and through research, I have found that there are 75 counties in Arkansas and 73 of them are designated "rural and underserved". That means there are 73 opportunities for a nurse to develop a teaching program and get it certified and get paid for that effort. There are guidelines as to what must be included in your teaching plan and there is lots of documentation required in order to bill. There are only 8 certified programs currently in my state. Go figure.

    You must be a RN, dietician, pharmacist, social worker with a masters, or a physician to get certified as a Diabetic Educator. As a nurse with a certified program, I would be able to become certified (CDE). I must prove 1000 hours of diabetic educating in a certified program and take a test to do so. I was able to find out about my state's Department of Health quarterly meetings and find a person to invite me. It is important to get as many high ranking people to help you and this is a way to network and do that.

    So, I encourage any of you to start looking into this if it appeals to you. You do not need to have a BSN or Masters or be a nurse practitioner. Start with finding the American Association of Diabetes Educators web site. I started with my own state BON, which lead me to the AADE web site. The AADE membership is a little pricy, but the information and support I have gotten has been more than worth the price. I spent a day contacting people in my state that were listed members of AADE and 2 people contacted me and they were active in the state's Department of Health as well.

    If any of you already have a program going, I would LOVE to hear from you and if any of you know that I'm not understanding all this clearly, please let me know. I am trying to learn all I can about this. If any of the rest of you are like me and would like to start down this road, you can contact me. We can start a support group on here.
    WellDaRN and emilyramos like this.
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    Quote from Mudwoman

    So, I encourage any of you to start looking into this if it appeals to you. You do not need to have a BSN or Masters or be a nurse practitioner. Start with finding the American Association of Diabetes Educators web site. I started with my own state BON, which lead me to the AADE web site. The AADE membership is a little pricy, but the information and support I have gotten has been more than worth the price. I spent a day contacting people in my state that were listed members of AADE and 2 people contacted me and they were active in the state's Department of Health as well.

    If any of you already have a program going, I would LOVE to hear from you and if any of you know that I'm not understanding all this clearly, please let me know. I am trying to learn all I can about this. If any of the rest of you are like me and would like to start down this road, you can contact me. We can start a support group on here.
    Thanks for all the info Mudwoman. I am very interested in more discussions about this. The getting started part of this type of work may actually have more participants in the Nursing entrepreneur section. Nurses who do direct billing might chime in. Let me know if you get a thread started because I would love to participate.
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    I love the way you think Mudwoman! We should for sure form a mastermind group and see where we can take the concept of holistic nursing/education. I would love to brainstorm and chat with you more--perhaps we can email? Feel free to drop me a line: DanaGelsomino@gmail.com I am really looking forward to getting to know you--I just love meeting my kinda people!
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    I am in the final months of an accelerated nursing degree, and need to find a nurse researcher to ask a few questions of, and would love to find someone who has done some research regarding EBP and holistic medicine. I'd appreciate any help! Thanks!
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    I love this forum and have the same aspirations and goals as you! I really am looking into this idea of being a nursing health coach, and for expanding into my own practice without having to be an APN. Why? Simple, I am fed up with the education "machine" and the enormous cost associated with higher education that I could achieve through my own intiative and learning. Also, many of the schools teach the same system that I have grown tired of, the system of medicine that ignores the whole person and instead "fixes" one aspect of a dynamic being through "medicine" that often leads to more side effects.

    There is a LOT that doctors and nurse practitioners can achieve and help patients with. However, how cool would it be to have a coach to assist you with your illness? I am going to get my Oncology Nursing Certification and then my massage liscense. I dream of having my own practice and simple HELPING people with all aspects of care. How does this sound to any of you? Have any of you heard of anything like this? Does anyone else feel, like me, that over certifications and over regulation have lead to a dearth of actual human caring and people that can help each other without worrying about liability and all of that?

    Nurses know a tremendous amount of information and yet are often tired out by running around the hospital taking care of stuff that does not involve health or education.
    bella201 and njoceangirl41 like this.
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    Ok. "If we want to have a holistic nursing practice, what do we do?" Well...I agree with others who are saying there is no need to be an APN to have a holistic practice. This is an idea that I have been struggling with over the last few years, when thinking about how to proceed with my interest in the holistic field, as an RN.
    There is just one program out there for a Holistic Nurse Practitioner, which is in New York. All others are online programs, which I don't really see how that can be a quality education, with no hands on experience.
    I'm starting to believe that everyone just needs to follow what interests them in the field of holistic nursing. There are so many different specialties to choose from, as previous posts have shown (ex: reiki, bach flower essences, yoga, aromatherapy, accupressure). Say I'm interested in Aromatherapy, then maybe my first step is to obtain a certificate in Aromatherapy through one of the programs AHNA offers. That way I can individualize my skills, determining the services that I want to offer patients.
    I've also thought about going to get my massage license so I could combine massage with aromatherapy, and potentially other holistic nursing services (that I'd get education for along the way). This type of practice could be accomplished without getting an APN degree.
    So what it comes down to is that I feel we can practice as Holistic Nurses with an RN degree and additional certifications/training in specialty areas. Then I think it might be best to have your own practice or maybe team up with a few other holistic RNs to open a practice. It's a long road ahead, but I can't wait. Good luck to everyone else out there! Any ideas/responses are welcome.
    bella201 and njoceangirl41 like this.
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    I am very interested in Diabetic Education as well and would love the opportunity to work in this field and leave the hospital setting. I addressed my interest while in nursing school and was told that I had to have a BSN to become certified in Arkansas.

    I would love to hear any helpful information you are able to share and how this is working for you.

    Melissa
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    So, as an update on what is going on......

    On Oct 29, I started a part time position in the hospital that I work in as Inpatient Diabetes and Wound Clinician. I had to resign my full time position in ICU and go PRN there and that is scary because I need the full time hours. Sometimes you have to want something bad enough to just go for it.

    I do not have a BSN, but I am working on my BSN with Excelsior. I joined AADE (American Asso of Diabetic Educators), attended some meetings in Little Rock with the Department of Health Diabetes Advisory Council, and did my CEU renewals on diabetes for my license. I read everything I can on diabetes and behavior modification, health coaching, and nutrition. There were 9 applicants for this part time position and I think all this was instrumental in me getting this job.

    I still have aspirations of doing health coaching/holistic nursing in addition to this. This position gives me an opportunity to become a CDE.......in fact part of my job description is to become CDE within a year.

    Melissa, I hope this helps you. I live in Arkansas and you do not have to have a BSN to become certified. You just have to have a certain number of hours that can be verified in diabetes education to qualify to take the exam. That is hard to do if you are not working in diabetes education. I was told by someone in the department of health to start documenting the education I did as a nurse on the floor (please be careful r/t HIPPA), but you can keep a journal/log of the date and number of minutes and what you taught and then be sure to record something in the patient record. That can end up counting towards the hours, I'm told. Take any position you can. Contact pharmacies as many have diabetes education programs too. Let people know that you are really interested in this type of nursing. Wound care and diabetes tend to go hand in hand at hospitals. If you can get a position in wound care, you may be able to be cross-trained in diabetes education. Apply with companies that provide health supplies and equipment r/t diabetes and wound care. Some nursing homes now have specialty wound care nurses.

    I may end up with several "part time" positions to end up with the income I need to survive while still staying focused on my end goals. I never gave up. I just believed that if I just kept doing what I was doing, something would come along. It did. I spent a few nights worried about the money. I'm still a little nervous. PRN doesn't guarantee me any hours. My income could be cut in half. If you want something really bad, you have to be willing to take the risk if the opportunity door opens.

    Charlee
    njoceangirl41 likes this.
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    I live in Conway, Arkansas. I would love to talk about things with you. I'm in a different place as a pre-nursing student with quite a lot more experience behind me (nearly 20 years) and the intent to practice as an FNP here in Central Arkansas. I want to go into family practice and have a very strong desire to combine holistic nursing and traditional medicine in treating my patients. I have every opportunity to direct my nursing career and I know very well where I want to go (as an adult student with a strong background in allied health, research, etc.) but I am still carving out my path. I would relish an opportunity to meet and swap information with you.


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