Is my nursing CYA brain taking it too far?

  1. Ok so after recent events I have read and reread anything I have to sign just to make sure all is as it should be. I have been doing this so much that I'm starting to question myself on everything, including my daughter's permission slips. So question:

    Band Medical Form:
    permission for student to attend trips throughout the year. This I have no problem with. "No, sponsor, chaperone, or representative of ISD will be held responsible for any accident or misfortune which might occur during any trip." This I'm questioning, am I reading into this more than necessary?

    Drug Testing Authorization:
    Listed below are the rx drugs and doses my child takes on a regular basis. Depending on medication and circumstance it may have to be verified with the doctor that prescribed it. I give permission to the DR who have prescribed med for treatment of child medical condition. they may also verify circumstance and discuss any medication effects on test result and or school performance. ( paraphrased) Does the school have the right to ask for this information? Does the same principles apply to a minor taking a drug test as an adult in which the MRO is supposed to call and verify medications and what not? Why does the school need permission to talk with the Dr for anything involving a child, instead of going through the childs parent for said information?

    I fear I'm probably making this out to be more than what I should, but thought I would see what others thought as well. Please know I am not asking for any legal advice, just how someone else reads these authorizations.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   hppygr8ful
    My health insurance carrier will not release any of my son's records to me unless I come in with my son (14) and he gives consent. They say they are protecting his privacy. During his annual physical I was asked to step out of the exam room for a portion of the exam. When my son came out and we were on our way home I asked him what happened after I left the room. He said the doctor asked if there were guns in our home and did he feel safe there? "So what did you say?" I asked, He grinned and said "I told him yes and yes."

    BTW this whole pediatric patients rights thing started when my son turned 12.

    Hppy
  4. by   quiltynurse56
    The band form, the part you are questioning is who bears responsibility should your child be hurt. This means that you will be and not the school, sponsors, etc.

    The med form for medications. You are giving them permission to check with your doctor, should they need to, about your child's medications. I am going to guess that most of the time they do not check with the doctor, but should there be a need, they have your permission to do so.

    What you see happening here is that the school is doing their own CYA.
  5. by   KRVRN
    I would probably just leave it blank. If he were on a med that has to be administered (or if he self administers) at school, the school would already have any needed info. An exception in my mind would be if he had an EpiPen or asthma inhaler.

    You signing it probably wouldn't be enough for the doctor's office to feel comfortable discussing his medical info. They would probably have their own form and you (and him) would have to sign it in person and officially request copies, blah blah etc...
  6. by   KRVRN
    Quote from KRVRN
    I would probably just leave it blank. If he were on a med that has to be administered (or if he self administers) at school, the school would already have any needed info. An exception in my mind would be if he had an EpiPen or asthma inhaler.

    You signing it probably wouldn't be enough for the doctor's office to feel comfortable discussing his medical info. They would probably have their own form and you (and him) would have to sign it in person and officially request copies, blah blah etc...
    Sorry, called your girl a boy!
  7. by   Kallie3006
    I understand the school CYA and as for the liability I understand the concept, but should said driver show up under the influence and wrecks ect, am I still going to be held responsible because of signing this? (not saying this has happened at all, hypothetical)

    As for the medications ect, as an adult taking a drug screen the company talks to the donor regarding medications ect and it is the donors responsibilty to provide proof the medications are legally prescribed. In this instance it is worded as the school is able to contact the doctor to get information about said child and condition and or meds, not the testing company.

    I understand that as the child gets older there are some privilaged information the child can keep from parents, contraceptive means, sexual activity ect, and making sure that the child feels safe in the home ect
    Last edit by Kallie3006 on Oct 12, '16 : Reason: posted before ready
  8. by   Kallie3006
    Quote from KRVRN
    Sorry, called your girl a boy!
    No worries! It's a real question but senerios hypothetical anyways! I 100% agree with the epi pen ect and medication that means life or death, absolutely the school should be informed and made sure said staff is appropriately trained ect. I was curious if the Dr. Office would accept that as a consent as well. Not that my child has any medical conditions that I'm worried about right now, but you never know what the future holds.

    I just don't think that the school should have access to this information unless the parent chooses to disclose, unless of course the information is pertinent to the childs functioning status during school.

    Thanks for the input everyone! Learned something new (never would I have thought I would need my minor child's consent for insurance information ect, that just makes me go....wow!)
  9. by   JustBeachyNurse
    1 in the event of gross negligence on behalf of the school or its employees (bus driver is inebriated) that waiver will not stand up in court so no worries there.

    2. FERPA & HIPAA both allow for care coordination. I sign very specific consents for school and alter as needed.
  10. by   Horseshoe
    Agree with above. In the event of gross negligence, you can still sue and win. Those waivers are basically worthless in the face of true negligence.
  11. by   Kallie3006
    Thank you!
  12. by   dialysisrnmom
    How long after you spoke to investigator did take for the board to contact you
  13. by   CoffeeRTC
    Have you ever looked at the consent forms for those trampoline parks? You sign everything away when you let your kids go there.
  14. by   NursieNurse14
    Quote from CoffeeRTC
    Have you ever looked at the consent forms for those trampoline parks? You sign everything away when you let your kids go there.

    I went to one recently. The wording stated that i was signing away my rights and the right of the other parent that was not there. (I doubt that would stand up in court)

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Is my nursing CYA brain taking it too far?