HIPAA Violation?

  1. 0
    In the past when I was doing clinicals in the ED a very famous celebrity/person came through massive MI failed resuscitation...I did CPR on him etc. Now approximately 2 years later I am writing a paper about historical markers and I plan to include him in it (ie project = historical markers personal to ones self). Would it be a HIPAA violation just to mention I received him as a patient in the ED and provided treatment before he subsequently died of cardiopulmonary arrest?

    This may seem trivial, but it can be a huge plus to my paper including this, but don't want to at any expense.
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    How can it be a huge plus? Is the grader a fan or in this case not a fan of said celebrity? I would discuss the issue WITHOUT any identifying characteristics. Unless I was discussing in general terms if being a vip prolonged the code etc, or that since this person was famous, a vip how that changed anything in terms of you care. I wouldn't mention anything that would identify the patient.
    tokmom likes this.
  5. 0
    It's a history class, huge historical figure and this issue prompted me to research/read on this person's accomplishments.

    If it would be a violation in any sense....I would just remove it from the paper.....because I am listing as one of the "historical markers" something that was put in this person's legacy.
  6. 0
    Personally, I wouldn't do it. I don't think you can say names and the place where this happened might not be too happy either. You would be best off to contact the legal department of the hospital this took place at and ask their opinion. I have a feeling you are using this as a , gee I did this to this person..whoohoo. Sorry, but that is how I took it. My husband takes care of VIP's all the time, and I can't even imagine him doing anything like that.
  7. 2
    What ive spoken has been misinterpreted then. I did speak with some collegues as well and im just not going to mess with the issue.
    Hoozdo and Altra like this.
  8. 1
    What ive spoken has been misinterpreted then. I did speak with some collegues as well and im just not going to mess with the issue.
    I think you made the right choice there.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Feb 1, '12
    dudette10 likes this.
  9. 1
    good decision. certainly not worth the grief you'll have rain down upon you if it's ever possible to identify you as the source of this personal health information.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  10. 1
    You made the most ethical decision of not including this particular case. You could have stated the case generally, but to provide specifics(including names) would definitely have you on the chopping block. If this were a Nursing course, you could also find yourself in violation of the program rules.
    Discernment is very important. I hate to be rude, but even asking this question exemplifies your need for more better practice.
    GrnTea likes this.
  11. 0
    HIPAA does cover the deceased and without express written permission you are in violation of federal, possibly state, statute.
  12. 1
    I didnt bother disclosing this to you guys, but this person's cause of death and hospital he went to were public knowledge. <----this right here was the only reason I gave it a second thought and considered it.

    "but even asking this question exemplifies your need for more better practice" <---Was this necessary? I think it was clear I understood HIPAA. As far as meeting my "need for more better practice", I think all is lost.
    Altra likes this.


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