doctor's office accessing of scripts - page 3

right about now I am ripshoot (george carlinism)....went for a work physical at a doctor's office that I have no prior relationship with and will have no further relationship with, and the MA looks... Read More

  1. Visit  netglow profile page
    1
    Doesn't matter that you had different insurance, a different doctor, or, that it was 10 years ago. The database has ALL information on you for which a claim was filed.

    Soon, even if you go to say, a clinic and pay cash, where no claim was generated, and then go to a drugstore and pay cash for a med - the visit and the med too will pop up for all providers to see.

    I have dealt with patient preauthorizations for treatment in which the patient omitted something (a variety of things), the preauthorization was approved by the insurance company, BUT DURING ADJUDICATION THE CLAIM WAS DENIED - this is because the in depth records search happens when the claim is up for payment. Patients are routinely accused of lying, and payment is denied to the shock of all. What I am saying is, that, they have access to ALL OF YOUR INFO right from the start (not necessary to ask you questions about your claims history). So this is a way they can deny coverage, by insisting that your not so perfect memory was an attempt at fraud.
    Esme12 likes this.
  2. Visit  Old.Timer profile page
    5
    The only thing surprising to me is that so many seem genuinely surprised at the accessibility of their info within the healthcare system.
    Aurora77, Esme12, KelRN215, and 2 others like this.
  3. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    0
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I don't take any meds other than a BP pill, but I don't like it either. Not a violation, but just having all your private records out there on the cyberverse for anyone with any tenuous connection to your care be it pharmacy, any office you go to, insurance companies etc.......

    I have nothing to hide, but I don't like it one bit and it definitely means I will not share much of anything if anything other than 'I fell fine" with my health care providers unless I am desperate.

    It will be interesting to see how it plays out.
    A person's medical information won't be able to just browse. An insurance company won't have access to your information unless they are your insurance carrier and are processing a claim, although in that situation they already have full access as it is.
  4. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    3
    I guess I'm naive because I don't really get how EMR's = death panels. As a Nurse, making it possible to have immediate access to a patient's history when then come in unconscious to a hospital in another state seems like a no brainer. Just a few weeks ago a patient in my hospital's ER died after she was given NTG. It turns out she was on a PH med, had that been in our system all sorts of bells and whistles would have gone off when we tried to give the NTG, unfortunately the only alarm that went off was the code blue.
    uRNmyway, Altra, and Nurse Leigh like this.
  5. Visit  grownuprosie profile page
    3
    Quote from DixieRedHead
    I really do not give a rip if any prescriber knows what I take. His newly employed, will be gone in 6 weeks, front desk clerk, that's a different story.
    That's how you consider it a HIPPA violaton.
    I am working as a front office clerk through nursing school. I have been one for 4 years. I am glad that when i graduate i will have more respect for them than people with your world view do. Sad that you see members of the healthcare team this way. I have had the benefit of working with some of the most intelligent and kind people I have ever met that fill this position. Are you one of those people that calls in and insists that only a licensed nurse is smart enough to schedule an appointment or take a message?

    As far as a receptionist seeing their medications, what is the issue here? I am held to the same standards of privacy as a MA while employed by a clinic. I will be fired as fast as them too if i breach confidentiality. Why are people so solipsistic to think that their medications matter one bit to a receptionist? Yes, i print med lists from all of their providers and give them to patients to verify before their appointment. Most people respond with, "Thank you so much! I was afraid i would have to write this list out and wear out my wrist!"

    sorry for interrupting the thread. I just don't like people making false generalities about groups of people.

    Now for something relevent: Maybe the MA was misinformed and that office was just part of the same EMR network as your usual PCP? I have never had an insurance company be so proactive as to share information before. But, hey, what do i know I am just a receptionist
    Teacup Pom, sharpeimom, and GrnTea like this.
  6. Visit  Ashley, PICU RN profile page
    9
    Quote from morte
    your tone is sl patronizing.....I am pi$$ed off because they didn't ask first, which would have given me the option to walk out. There is nothing there that is a problem, it is the idea/principle of the thing.
    Your tone is very combative. You may not get only opinions that you agree with here, but nevertheless they are valid points. No one is patronizing because they don't agree with you.

    Clearly there IS something that's a problem, and it's not just the principle. You did not want to office to know about the medications you were taking and are very upset that they found out. Your comment about having the option to walk out suggests that you would not have been forthcoming with the information if you were asked and would rather forfeit the job (work physical) instead of disclose your medication use. Regardless of what medications you're taking, if you were at the doctor's office for a physical that assessed your ability to competently work, then they need to know what medications you are taking. That information was made available by your insurance company. If you don't like it, then you need to talk to your insurance company and find out why it's allowed and if you can do anything to stop it.

    What you need to understand is that you don't have to sign a consent form for every little thing. When a patient is admitted to the hospital they sign one general consent form. They don't sign a consent for an IV, another consent for a blood draw, another consent for an x-ray, another consent for an NG tube, another consent for medications, another for IV fluids, etc. When you signed a consent to be seen at the doctor's office, that includes consent for them to access your medical information. I apologize if you were not aware of this or don't agree with it.
    Teacup Pom, BlueDevil,DNP, uRNmyway, and 6 others like this.
  7. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    1
    Quote from MunoRN
    Medication reconciliation is often done at any office visit, which personally I think is a pretty good idea. I guess I'm not really clear on why you wouldn't want a Doctor's office, where you are apparently seeking care, to know what medications you take?
    It is not the concept of med reconciliation that I would resent. It is the fact that the information did not come from me.
    morte likes this.
  8. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    2
    Quote from caliotter3
    It is not the concept of med reconciliation that I would resent. It is the fact that the information did not come from me.
    Exactly. And that it is so easily accessible.
    tewdles and morte like this.
  9. Visit  kids profile page
    2
    Do people not realize that every State has a database for logging prescriptions for scheduled/controlled drug, and that many states log every prescription you fill?
    Abuse of the Federal Prescription Database Law - TalkLeft: The Politics Of Crime
    Prescription Drug Monitoring Program - FAQ

    Also, at least one commonly used escript provider draws prescription history from a multitude of sources.
    Surescripts - The Nation's E-Prescription Network - Physicians/Prescribers
    You simply need to contact your vendor representative and ask about getting connected to the Surescripts network for access to our Prescription Benefit, Medication History, and Prescription Routing services.

    <snip>

    Medication History services allow prescribers to access critically important information on their patient's current and past medications from pharmacy benefit managers and community pharmacies. This helps inform prescribers about potential medication issues with their patients and can improve safety and quality.
    My brand new doctor, paid for using brand new insurance, 3000 miles from my old doctor, had access to every med I've been prescribed in the last 3 years, who prescribed it and what pharmacy I filled it at.
    Altra and Esme12 like this.
  10. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    0
    Doesn't mean I like it! And I don't even take any controlled meds......
  11. Visit  kids profile page
    2
    You (the collective you) think this information sharing is invasive now?
    What do you think is going to happen if/when the US healthcare system becomes 'single payor' or 'government run' like it is in countries with socialized medicine?
    uRNmyway and Esme12 like this.
  12. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from kids
    Do people not realize that every State has a database for logging prescriptions for scheduled/controlled drug, and that many states log every prescription you fill?
    Abuse of the Federal Prescription Database Law - TalkLeft: The Politics Of Crime
    Prescription Drug Monitoring Program - FAQ

    Also, at least one commonly used escript provider draws prescription history from a multitude of sources.
    Surescripts - The Nation's E-Prescription Network - Physicians/Prescribers


    My brand new doctor, paid for using brand new insurance, 3000 miles from my old doctor, had access to every med I've been prescribed in the last 3 years, who prescribed it and what pharmacy I filled it at.
    .....Scary isn't it?
  13. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    1
    Quote from caliotter3
    It is not the concept of med reconciliation that I would resent. It is the fact that the information did not come from me.
    Quote from CrunchRN
    Exactly. And that it is so easily accessible.
    Right. It's not about coordination of care between providers, either. Who would dispute that is ultimately a time-saver and perhaps even a way to avoid an unanticipated negative event due to miscommunication between various specialists in cases where people have multiple numbers of them. So go ahead and give consent for that. It doesn't mean the choice should be taken away from everyone else, though.

    The issue is who directs the release of such information. I'm a pessimist (or a realist?) - I just assume anything in cyberspace can be discovered by someone else, either through intent or human error.

    I don't blame morte one bit for being upset about that.
    morte likes this.

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