Boy, did I mess up :( - page 2

by soon_2Bnurse

7,498 Views | 20 Comments

I have been an LPN for quite a few years. Just last May I graduated with my RN. For the last 5 years I have worked in a correctional facility. Once I had my RN I worked at a hospital that was over an hour drive away and was so... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from LYNDAA
    Risk Mgmt will probably devise a way to decrease the chances of this ever happening again; such as writing everything out on something like an SBAR form that would include the clients's name and and ID as we'll as the parent's name and phone number and perhaps STRONGLY insist that you have all other information set aside as you 'call report' so-to-speak. In this day in age, it is RARE that someone does something that has never been done before. I know you feel awful but what you did helps Risk Management to head off future occurrences. If anything, they will more than likely shove HIPAA and confidentiality down your throat again. Try not to worry. And oh yeah, don't do that again. (smile)
    Sorry about the typos. iPad has a mind of its on with its automatic insertions.......
  2. 0
    Thank you all for the kind words! I am so disappointed in myself to have lost focus like that. I was so worried in my head about having all the right answers for the parent, that I didn't realize I was on the wrong facesheet. It's a new job with a totally different amount of paperwork required (due to minors being involved). Regardless of the outcome (excluding BON) I have learned a lesson to slow down.
  3. 5
    I just wanted to say something. How I wish I knew you folks better and had the priviledge to work with people like you. It's the one thing I feel I am missing. It's a new job, so the adjustment is there, but working nights..is lonely too (I am the only medical person there from 2100 to 0700.

    Well..no official word..but i recieved the schedule for March and I AM ON IT! "Good sign" I hope! God Bless you all for helping me.
    Last edit by soon_2Bnurse on Feb 20, '13 : Reason: update
  4. 2
    This is not as big a deal as you are making it, lol. You are going to be fine. Like you said, slow down, and make sure you have everything together before you make calls. Good luck!
    GrnTea and KitkatPRN like this.
  5. 1
    I think it's probably going to be fine. I agree you probably won't be reported to the BON over this. It is, as others have said, a mistake. And nobody was hurt.

    I would agree with the others who say risk management wants a statement for the sake of having a statement. We've had some "adverse events" or "near misses" that our risk management dept where I work forms a committee including risk management, department management, department educators, and staff involved and those committees are usually where policy change comes from.

    I think the honesty you displayed was the absolute best way to handle it. I have to follow my "gut" about situations. If it doesn't feel right it isn't. Sometimes in life you can fix it, others the only 'fix' there is is to apologize and work hard not to make the same mistake again. I've learned more as a nurse in things I did that weren't 100% correct or the best/easiest way to handle XYZ than I did by doing it right the first time.
    KitkatPRN likes this.
  6. 0
    Dear soon-2beNurse,
    I think you are overly concerned. First of all, no harm was done to anyone. As such, that cannot affect your license. I am not sure how Risk-management got involved unless they have nothing better to do. You were honest enough to let your DON know about the inadvertent boo-boo that you made and she should have just let it go at that. She is the one who contacted Risk-management. If I were you, I wouldn't worry too much about it.
  7. 0
    Isn't the idea of reporting mainly to "reduce" this sort of incidence from happening in the future rather than threaten our jobs and license?
  8. 0
    Nurses make med errors and don't lose their jobs. If you lost your job over this then the hospital must have a high turnover rate.
  9. 0
    you did the right thing by telling the DON. We are not perfect. It was a true mistake; in the future just take your time to make sure you are addressing the right patient but kudos to being honest. A lot of nurses would have kept it quiet! Unfortunately, sometimes, that is how we learn.
  10. 0
    Quote from nikkimodl
    you did the right thing by telling the DON. We are not perfect. It was a true mistake; in the future just take your time to make sure you are addressing the right patient but kudos to being honest. A lot of nurses would have kept it quiet! Unfortunately, sometimes, that is how we learn.
    So true !! I think you did the absolute best thing by informing your DON !! I for one think that it was just an honest mistake and no harm was done, so really? It's not a big deal !! You may feel embarrassed but NO ONE was hurt (WheW) ... and happy dance to that !! We are only human & mistakes happen !! When we give a med, we are more careful for sure, but when we dial a telephone # ... maybe not so much ... give yourself a break, you owned up to it and no one was hurt, which in my book equals a GreaT day/shift !!!!!!!! <3


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