Nursing & Depression - page 8

While visiting in the lounge one day, we discovered that every nurse there was on an anti-depressant. I have had 'Treatment Resistant Depression' for about 20 years--as long as I've been a nurse. ... Read More

  1. by   lisamcrn
    I don't think nursing itself causes depression. I think some of the enviroments nurses are working in leads to situational depressionat at a much higher rate. This also I feel is a different depression than chronic long term depression. I have been very depressed at certain times in my life. When I got married I was, because deep inside my self I knew the marriage shouldn't have occurred. I got very depressed when my exhusband moved out and had to be responsible for 4 children. I have always become horribly depressed with each of my 4 pregnancies. Postpartum depression has been the hardest of all of these.

    The only episode I can contribute to nursing was this last year. I detested where I was, hated it, have no respect for my bosses, the corporation, little for fellow nurses ...most hired were the dregs of nursing and the few good ones left within a month of my leaving. I may have worked with some nice people, but I expected these nice people to have better stardards while on the job. I went on celexa for the first time. This depression I couldn't seem to shake and my family seemed to get the brunt of my anger and resentment knowing I had to go back to hell for yet another day. The celexa just seemed to reduce my anger somewhat and help me sleep....I was still depressed, just not so focused on what was aggrevating the depression. I quit my celexa after 12 weeks and decided it was time to take control of MY life again. I quit my job in June and at the end of July I found a position that I am happy with. Happy with because my coworkers are courteous, respectful and responsible. Not that my position is less involving, because it is more, but the enviroment and change altered and enhanced my perspective. I worked thru what needed to be done where I was unable to do before due to feeling despair, lonliness, and isolation caused by the depression. The celexa use helped me realize and actually face what was going on and I was able to focus again to make changes to improve what was the upmost stressor in my life.

    This place was so bad they had 5 at last count cnas who did not show up for work and did not call--no call no shows--that they rehired, 1 for the third time. They called me in July with a huge raise and my fiance said he would move out if I went back there, my mom actually told me I was stupid to even consider the offer when I told them I would.

    Anyway.....another perspective......Lisa
  2. by   micro
    Originally posted by ruthless
    i personally think that the govt should look at putting antidepressant medication into the water supply - imagine how much happier and more calm everyone would be...it would make an interesting study proposal....who knows where it would lead?! would we continue doing what we do?

    Know this was meant for a ha!ha!......... and I would be ha! ha!ing' also, if I hadn't heard it so much.......

    but back to something that carpe de um stated so well.....

    antidepressants are not a happy pill.......
    they just give you the ability to think and to think clearly....
    "to be normal if you will".......

    remember folks, it is a chemical imbalance.......
    yes, there are situational depressions in which the chemical imbalance may have not been there, but something changes within the system(either hormonal, neurotransmitters, combination).................

    so i say again.....
    carpedeum
    thx for an excellent thread.....
    to you and to all.......
    rather with this diagnosis or no.......

    be well
    eat right
    exercise,
    see your doc regularly....
    take care of yourself.....
    like yourself........
    take whatever medication you need......
    and if it doesn't work with your doctor.....
    find one that does work.........
    life is too short.......
    live, live, live

    :kiss
  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    I don't think the incidence of depression is necessarily higher in our profession than it is in others, nor are we more likely to seek help than the average person. In fact, medical people are often the worst patients of all (I should know---I go to the doctor only when I've got one foot in the grave). I finally went on Paxil a year and a half ago, some 30 years after my first episode of depression when I was a teenager. I've had about half a dozen of these in my life, and they lasted for months on end. I never knew I was even in one until I was almost out, and of course when I was young you didn't talk about it because you didn't want anyone to think you were "crazy". I only got help this last time because it was the first one I'd ever had that didn't have a precipitating event that triggered it, and while I haven't been suicidal since my 20s, I kept thinking there were worse things than death.......namely, going on feeling the way I did. Now, we nurses know all the clinical stuff about depression and can tell some one else how to take care of themselves, but it's different when it's us---we're not as good at taking care of ourselves. But that's true of most women in general, and most nurses are women even in this enlightened age. And let's face it, more women than men suffer from depression. I just wish people would get over the idea that it's a sign of weakness to take a medication that restores equilibrium to the chemical soup that nourishes our brains. For the first time in my life I know what it is to feel normal, and while I sometimes resent the fact that I have to take a pill to stay on an even keel, I'm thankful that it's available to me. And if that makes me weak in some people's eyes, well, so be it.
  4. by   TheLionessRN
    I have lived with depression since I was a teenager. I started taking Prozac in 93 or thereabouts, and was told I had to come off after 9 months. Subsequent rounds of the med were less effective. My new doctor put me on Effexor, but I was not regular with the med, and ended up asking to be admitted when it got too much to bear. I was only in the hospital for a day and a half, and was so intensely uncomfortable with the general population that I begged to be discharged. The doc did increase my Effexor dosage, and gave me the speech about treating depression just like diabetes and to stop being non-compliant. About a year ago, I realized that, if I missed a dose of Effexor, I would go into withdrawal. I want to warn you all that, while it isn't addictive, there is a withdrawal with the med. I got switched over to Celexa a few weeks ago, and only had about 3 days of withdrawal symptoms, luckily. The doc called it a panic attack, or hyperventilation, because I got numb around my mouth, and on the tip of my tongue. I thought I was having a seizure.
    I really wonder if others out there have experienced any problems with Effexor.

    I think it is funny, not in a ha ha way....I read those s/s of depression, and the suggestion to get help immediately if you have a suicide plan. I developed my suicide plan years ago. I haven't ever acted on it, but it is there, like an exit sign, just in case things get bad again.
  5. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by micro

    be well
    eat right
    exercise,
    see your doc regularly....
    take care of yourself.....
    like yourself........
    take whatever medication you need......
    and if it doesn't work with your doctor.....
    find one that does work.........
    life is too short.......
    live, live, live
    :kiss
    This is a beautiful word usage, right up to the point where you say like yourself. It would have to be more than like. You HAVE TO love yourself to the max, or the second max if you are into god. If you merely like yourself, and you love some other thing more, it can destroy you. Make it love...that sweet and warm laughter of love! I'm sorry micro, just chidding :-(
  6. by   micro
    chiddin' :-)
    yep, had trouble with that love yourself thing along the way.....
    it is a necessity, though.....
    Mario,
    you are right :-)

    and mjlrn97
    "I just wish people would get over the idea that it is a weakness to take a medication that restores the equilibrium to the chemical soup that nourishes our brain."

    you are so right on.........keep speaking out..........

    micro and out.......

    luv to all,
    more love to others,
    and most love to me,
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    Re LionessRN's discussion of withdrawal from AD meds: You are not alone! I am absolute *hell* to be around on the rare occasions when I run out of Paxil; I feel off-kilter, I lose my balance, go numb around the mouth, and it's almost like my body doesn't even really belong to me. And emotionally, I'm a train wreck: once I went without my meds for 3 days and found myself screaming at an employee in the Safeway because they didn't have the particular chicken strips I wanted!! After that I've never allowed myself to go without for longer than a day, but my family always seems to know when those days happen because I guess I'm more volatile when I miss even one dose. I really don't like the idea of being dependent on this medication, but I hate those surrealistic physical sensations I get and I hate my unpredictability even more (to say nothing of what my husband and kids have to go through when I miss my meds). So it looks like I'm stuck. But as I said in a previous post, if my brain is missing something it needs to function properly and the means to supply it are available, I'm taking it!!
  8. by   micro
    Originally posted by micro

    and mjlrn97
    "I just wish people would get over the idea that it is a weakness to take a medication that restores the equilibrium to the chemical soup that nourishes our brain."
    you are so right on.........keep speaking out..........
    mjlrn97

    i repeat myself
    keep speaking out.........
    you rock.

    micro and out
  9. by   ruthless
    Originally posted by mamabear
    This might be slightly off the topic, but what the hell:
    I've been on sick leave since the end of July. I had the poor taste to have two seizures at work, literally knocking myself senseless. Once I was cleared to return to work, I had an attack of pancreatitis that put me in the hospital for 11 days. To add insult to injury, I had an ERCP, after which I had ERCP-induced pancreatitis and hemorrhaging (1500-2000ml). I'm still waiting to return to work, and I'm so damn depressed I can't hardly stand it All the antidepressants and talk therapy in the world don't seem to be putting a dent in this I haven't considered suicide, thank God: I think I'll stay around out of spite But sometimes I have all I can do to drag my butt out of bed.
    well girl, i don't know if this will cheer u up...but if it makes you feel any better - i thought my life was pretty crappy until i read what has happened to u. i can sympathise with why u feel so low...u have been through hell. depression on top of this just to cap it off as well- sounds like u have got the package deal. unfortuantely, there is no one fix all - i only wish there was!!!.medication can help - but may not be the only answer for u. take every day or even every part of the day just one step at a time - BE KIND TO YOURSELF IN EVERYWAY POSSIBLE AND STUFF WHAT OTHERS THINK. your entire life has gone through a very traumatic experience and u need to give yourself time - this is a reality. do you think that perhaps your depresseion may actually be part of a grieving process related to your situation? i'm not a psychologist but i wonder if that could be at the root of this.
    all ican suggest my friend is that you hold onto and use those people who give u strength and get rid of/ignore the negatives in your life - a metaphorical life enema !!! . whilst you are feeling like crap - feel proud of yourself that the old and true u is still dragging her butt out of bed...you still have the strenght and determination to carry on and for that (even though i don't know you ) i am proud of you and wish you well. regards ruthless
  10. by   tiredernurse
    Originally posted by Kikumaru
    The other day was doing some registry work at a major hospital in Riverside County. The nurses I worked with were very nice, caring, and we all worked as a team. I truly felt sorry for a nurse who had a confused, hallucinating patient, who, according to the daughter "never acted like this before." The daughter showed up on the floor acting hostile, agitated, and downright uneducated in her approach to problem resolutions. Now, bear in mind, this is a family member who may show up on an every-other-day basis, becomes verbal and leaves after one hour. Her comment, upon entering the room was, "This isn't like mom. She's gotten worse. I'm not leaving until I know what is going on." The nurse, hearing this, came into the room and began to ask questions and speaking professionally to the family: 1) Hi! I am the nurse who has been assigned to your mom and she arrived about two hours ago. I understand you are concerned about your mothers condition. What was her previous behavior? 2) You feel it may be the pain medications causing her to behave like this? Let me try to reach the physician and we can discuss her situation then you can speak to him and express your concerns. 3) Is there anything that I can further assist you with in order to resolve any problems you feel we're not addressing? During this entire conversation, the dominant, non-professional family member became loud, obsessed and potentially dangerous. Wonder why nurses are leaving......let the family care for them. Anyway, back to the antidepressant issue, after assisting this nurse with "satisfying" this family member and patient, she stated she might need to speak to someone and get some time off or end up on medication, like the rest of some nurses she has worked with on occassion.
  11. by   tiredernurse
    I found this story interesting and sadly one that occurs more than it should. I had a coworker being reamed out by an irate physician the other day. It had to do with a lab error. The charge nurse heard the abuse the nurse was taking and stepped in. He assured the physician how sorry he was and it will never happen again, blah blah, blah ..... I butted my two cents worth in and looked straight into the doctors eye and said "and people wonder why there is a nursing shortage". All too often we take this, but to have your superior condone it is unacceptable. I see this happen everyday with unhappy "customers" and it breaks my heart. Sure they will turn around and give you "it's good customer service spiel", but what about us? We are dwindly in numbers and deserve a little customer service ourselves. Depression in nursing? Not shocking, it's wonder our suicide rates aren't higher. We are definately a special breed.
  12. by   mamabear
    Thanks, ruthless, for your compassionate reply. I have been told, more times than I care to remember, to "just snap out of it", or asked what did I have to "be depressed about" That's like asking what does so-and-so have to "be diabetic about". Unless you've been there, or have a family member/loved one with major depression, it's hard to comprehend how crippling a disease it can be.
    I was diagnosed with major depression in 1992. After taking half the meds in the PDR, I finally got lucky with Effexor XR 150mg and Remeron 30mg. The meds don't make every day perfect; sometimes I have really crappy times and even really God-awful times.:imbar But, more often than not, the neurochemical soup in my brain is up to par.
    As they say in the various Twelve Step programs, "this too shall pass", and it does, and it will.
  13. by   VivaLasViejas
    Mamabear, you really said it. Life is far from perfect, and the meds don't change that; what they do is make it possible to deal with the problems our messed-up brain chemistries have gotten us into. They clear the fog out of our heads so we can get on with the work of becoming who we really are.

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