Nursing & Depression - page 6

While visiting in the lounge one day, we discovered that every nurse there was on an anti-depressant. I have had 'Treatment Resistant Depression' for about 20 years--as long as I've been a nurse. ... Read More

  1. by   adrienurse
    Depression is a major stigma. I would not tell my boss or administration about it, because I don't trust them enough to know that some day it wouldn't be used against me. I have disclosed that I am on antidepressants to some coworkers, but it is only to those who are going through the came situation.

    I remember when I was a nursing student, doing my psych rotation at on the inpatient ward in a hospital. A woman was admitted for depression and it was discovered that she was a nurse. Everybody working on the unit had a mixed reaction. To some it seemed that somehow this woman aught to be better than that, depression was for other people -- not for nurses (they aren't human enough, I guess). The other half of us (myself included) were really scared by the idea that this could happen to a nurse. We wondered whether the prefession would also cause this to happen to us. What scared me the most, though, was the idea that if I were ever a patient with the big dirty word DEPRESSION written in my chart, that the nurses taking care of me would judge me the same way. My biggest fear when I was going though my major depressive crisis, was that I would end up in the ER.
  2. by   ohbet
    Whats the alternative to anti-depressants?
    If nurses discontinued their prozac I think we see a sharp rise in alcohol use by nurses.
  3. by   mario_ragucci
    I heard, with interest, that a 20 year study in denmark concluded that suicide rates are down 50%, attributed to anti-depressants. But I still don't know how they would make me feel, or the kinds of things they do to people to make them less sad.
    Pretty much the most challenging thing in nursing, to me, is a female co-worker who is very nervous all the time, and is anti-social. I consider it to be an occupational hazard I must look out for, and not let effect me. I feel other peoples sorrow and pain when they are near me physically, and festering depression is hard to be near.
  4. by   micro
    untreated and undiagnosed depression is hard to have and to be around........
    a disease process(of any kind) that is untreated and undiagnosed is hard to see in others and hard to be around..........
    that is i am glad that the stigma is lifting, but i do not feel that it has lifted enough or maybe never will.........

    As a nurse & caring person, Mario, I know what you are saying.....
    it is hard to feel someone else's pain, but that is what makes you a great cna and an even greater nurse itf. And all I am not singling Mario out, this thread and the threads when stress, depression and other emotional heated situations are discussed seems to bring out the caring nature in each of us. We are different people, but we are much the same. It is nice to share this field with such great people as all of you.
  5. by   carpe_de_em
    IT'S NICE TO SEE SOME MAJOR HONESTY HERE, IT WOULD BE NICE IF COULD OCCUR SOMEWHERE BESIDES BEHIND A CLOSED MED ROOM DOOR.

    I HAVE HAD SEVERAL SUICIDE ATTEMPTS, SEVERAL PSYCH ADMISSIONS, BEEN TO MORE COUNSELORS THAT I CAN COUNT. I AM ON AN ANTIDEPRESSANT, ANTI-ANXIETY AGENT, ANTI-PSYCHOTIC, AND A MOOD ELEVATOR. I HONESTLY BELIEVE I'VE BEEN ON EVERY ANTI-DEPRESSANT EVER MADE. (REMEMBER, I'VE BEEN FIGHTING THIS FOR 20 YEARS,) ALSO ON LITHIUM FROM ONE UNCARING DOC THAT SAW ME ONCE AND WROTE ME OFF AS BIPOLAR...WHAT I'D GIVE FOR A DAY OR TO OF MANIA!!!

    AFTER ALL THESE YEARS I HAVE FINALLY FOUND A SURPRISING PLACE WHERE I FEEL I AM GETTING REAL HELP. BELIEVE IT OR NOT IT IS ALCOHOLICS ANOMYOUS. I AM NOT ALCOHOLIC, BUT A FRIEND OF MINE IS. I STARTED GOING TO OPEN MEETINGS. REPLACE THE WORD ALCOHOLC WITH DEPRESSION/ANXIETY AND IT FITS ME TO A TEE. JUST LOOK AT THE FIRST 3 OF THE TWELVE STEPS:
    1. WE ADMITTED THAT WE WERE POWERLESS OVER ALCOHOL (DEPRESSION/ANXIETY)--THAT OUR LIVES HAVE BECOME UNMANAGEABLE.
    2. CAME TO BELIEVE THAT A POWER GREATER THAN URSELVES COULD RESTORE US TO SANITY.
    3. MADE A DECISION TO TURN OUR WILL AND OUR LIVES OVER TO THE CARE OF GOD AS WE UNDERSTOOD HIM.

    I'VE TRIED TO TELL THE SERIOUSNESS OF MY DISEASE THAT I REFERRED TO ABOVE TO PEOPLE I THOUGHT WERE CLOSE FRIENDS AND BELIEVE ME, THEY DROP LIKE FLIES. PEOPLE IN AA JUST HUG YOU AND SAY "I'VE BEEN THERE." SOME OF THEM HAVE STORIES THAT MAKE MY LIFE LOOK LIKE A WALK IN THE PARK. FOR THE FIRST TIME I HAVE HOPE. THESE PEOPLE UNDERSTAND UNMANAGEABLE LIVES AND A NEED TO BE RESTORED TO SANITY. I SEE SOMETHING IN THEM I WANT.
  6. by   Eeyore
    It's nice to know you aren't the only one..I have been on different meds for depression for over 20 years. Celexa is the current one and it is working well for me. I jokingly tell people" I know when I miss a few days of meds...the dog ask me if I've had my pills. Anyway what are your opinions concerning the usefulness of talk therapy for a chemical imbalance?
  7. by   sarajasmine
    :kiss You summed up what I've been thinking for a long time! I've been an RN over 18 yrs and have a 3 year old, as a single parent. Probably one of the main reasons I've worked agency nursing since she was born. Although agencies (some) can have quite an attitude if you need to cancel for a sick child too! I hate that guilt trip they try to put on you! I only know two hospitals in the Dallas area that actually has on-site child care. ...And I know about depression too! Thanks for your posting!
  8. by   Alley Cat
    Originally posted by Eeyore
    [Anyway what are your opinions concerning the usefulness of talk therapy for a chemical imbalance? [/B]

    My cousin who has suffered with clinical depression for YEARS did not get anywhere until 1. somebody decided his depression was a chemical imbalance, and 2. he had to talk to people about things from his past that may have been triggers in the first place. He and his brother both have emotional problems (bro. is schizophrenic secondary to a head injury), their 2 sisters (as far as he or any of the family knows) are fine. So I think it has to be a combination; but I'm not a psych nurse and not on antidepressants myself. Maybe a case by case thing? Would also depend on finding an excellent counselor/psychiatrist/psychologist to begin with.
  9. by   carpe_de_em
    Originally posted by Eeyore
    It's nice to know you aren't the only one..I have been on different meds for depression for over 20 years. Celexa is the current one and it is working well for me. I jokingly tell people" I know when I miss a few days of meds...the dog ask me if I've had my pills. Anyway what are your opinions concerning the usefulness of talk therapy for a chemical imbalance?

    I,TOO, AM ON CELEXA. I THINK IT HAS HELPED A LOT. MY OPINION ON TALK THERAPY IS MIXED. FINDING A TRULY GOOD THERAPIST IS NEXT TO IMPOSSIBLE. THEY CHARGE OUTRAGEOUS FEES, YOU TELL THEM YOU ARE EXTREMELY DEPRESSED, MISS A VISIT B/C YOU AN'T GET OUT OF BED. AND INSTEAD OF CALLING TO SEE IF YOU ARE OK, THEY JUST CHARGE YOU FOR THE MISSED APPOINTMENT. I HAVE ONLY HAD ONE GOOD THREAPIST IN 20 YEARS. WHEN I LEFT HER OFFICE EACH TIME I FELT LIKE I HAD OPTIONS IN LIFE AND THE STRENGTH TO ATTEMPT THEM.

    MY BEST "THERAPY" WAS A GOOD GIRLFRIEND WHO HAD BEEN A HERION ADDICT. SHE HAD ETREME ANXIETY AND UNDERSTOOD WHEN I TOLD HER I WAS AFRAID TO BE OUT AFTER DARK, SHE KNEW WHAT PANIC ATTACKS WERE LIKE, SHE, TOO, LIVED WITH DEEP DEPRESSION, WE DRANK TONDS OF COFFEE, AND LEARNED TO LAUGH AT OURSELVES AND THE STUPID, IRRITATING EMOTIONAL TURMOIL WE LIVED WITH. SHE HAS MOVE AWAY NOW BUT WE STILL FEEL CONECTED AT THE HEART. I DID MORE HEALING DURING THAT TWO YEAR FRIENDSHIP THAN I DID IN ALL MY YEARS OF THERAPY!

    IF ANYONE NEEDS AN UNDERSTANDING SHOULDER, LET ME KNOW!
  10. by   NurseDianne
    I suppose since "depression" is diagnosed as a "two week straight" feeling of all those things, maybe I'm not depressed after all. So what is it? The blues?
    I can't say I feel depressed all the time, not even 90% of the time, but there are days, even 2 days in a row, where I am totally exhausted, wiped out, not willing or able to give of myself to anyone.
    I fully believe, that in nursing, it's so easy to talk to the doctors, explain how we are feeling, and have them prescribe some antidepressant. I have actually, in the past several weeks, contemplated talking to my doc about the same thing. It is that work is so hectic? Or that my oldest just got married? Or school? a combo? Who knows?
    I have been such a hateful *itch to my family and friends. :imbar but, I don't want to be labeled as "depressed". It amazes me why my husband even stays around at times like these. I know I don't eat right, exercise enough or do all those things to allivate depression. But, I honestly, can't find the time.
    So, any good ideas?
  11. by   KarafromPhilly
    Carpe de em--I know what you mean about being charged for a missed appointment when you're too depressed to get out of bed. Gee, how therapeutic. Thanks a lot. A phone call to see that you are still alive would be nice. Isn't that part of their JOB?
  12. by   mario_ragucci
    Someone on this board once said celexia is like "prozac with a kick." What does it mean "a kick." Like, a speed buzz? Taking speed and bedside nursing would be hard to do, coffee is about as far as i could go. What does it feel like when you drink coffee and take celexa? I know it is hard to get in/out of a rut of no time. Remember: having no time is when your dead. When your dead, you don't gotta worry about taking anything or even worrying. So save some of your problems for when your dead :-) Not spooky, just trying to put emphasis on you and life today and how precious we forget it is :-)
  13. by   AlexandraRN
    I am a psychiatric nurse and see many nurses as patients on the inpatient units. I think the public forgets and we forget that we are human to. The nature of our jobs keeps our stress level at an all time high day after day. Then we go home and try to juggle our family life. It's all too much!!! I teach others about coping skills and appropriate defense mechanisms yet I cant seem to put those to work for myself. I have been on and anti-depressants for 20 years now. My depression started with the birth of my twin daughters. I was so over-whelmed and frustrated trying to do everything and be everything to everybody. Almost all the nurses i work with are on anti-depressants. Working with patients who are in emotional pain 8 hours a day, 40 hours a week takes it toll on you. It really gets to you after a while. No matter how much you try to leave it at the job our patients are important to us and we take on their pain sometimes!!!! Of course it leaves us drained and frustrated to see them come back after a few months. The old revolving door syndrome. I do everything I can to keep myself emotionally stable. Sometimes it just doesnt work for me. I hate not wanting to get out of bed sometimes, I hate feeling so drained, I hate feeling irritable and cranky sometimes with family and friends. I agree with a statement made in one of the threads above, its easier to understand depression when youve been there!!!!!!

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