Nursing & Depression - page 5

While visiting in the lounge one day, we discovered that every nurse there was on an anti-depressant. I have had 'Treatment Resistant Depression' for about 20 years--as long as I've been a nurse. ... Read More

  1. by   formernurse
    Mario, You ask if there is a "certain" look when someone is depressed. Believe me, unless you are a master of disguise, you will not mistake the look of depression. Having dealt with my own depressions for better than 20 years, and having taken antidepressants for the entire time, there is no way you wouldn't know when I'm experiencing a depressive mood.
  2. by   chrisrob
    good thread i have taken antidepressants but now i'm not sure if i was depressed or just burntout so much is expected from nurses we have so many different roles i.e mum/dad, wife.husband, son/daughter etc nurse. The nurse bit allows us to be under constant presure from patients their families docs other medical teams the media wow can they slaughter a nurse if she gets it wrong don't see them doing a full article on how they normaly always get it right sometimes i think we reach a point where we have just had enough veral and physical abuse and get 'tired' for want of a better word and where are our managers then they can see whats happening but just want there work area covered so you WILL pull that extra shift no matter that u promised your kids to go somewhere (guilt) somewhere we lose ourselves in all those roles so if taken antidepressents gives you beathing space to find 'YOU' again take them its not so easy to find time to do other things nurses are always playing catch up in their lives because they dont have time or there just to knackered after a shift to do anything but sleep so maybe if you look at the population as a whole there is more depression and stress out there not just in nursing but nurses are supposed to cope with everything so to the nurses who are on antidepresents and are depressed keep taking the pills if they keep you going advice to change your livestyles cant help becuse of the nature of the job and at the end of it most of us love being nurses and don't want to do anything else even if it does kill us LOL
  3. by   carpe_de_em
    THANKDS FOR ALL THE RESPONSES. DEPRESIION IS A DISEASE OF ISOLATION. I REALLY JUST WONDERED THREE THINGS:
  4. by   carpe_de_em
    SORRY ABOUT THAT -- HIT THE WRONG KEY AND OFF IT WENT. HERE IS WHAT I REALLY WANTED TO KNOW

    ARE THERE OTHER NURESE OUT THERE WITH SEVERE DEPRESSION AND/OR ANXIETY DISORDER?

    DO THEY FEEL LIKE THEY HAVE TO HIDE IT FROM ADMINISTRATION?

    DO THEY FEEL LIKE NURSING ADMINISTRATION IS VERY INTOLERANT WITH THESE DISORDERS.

    I HEARD COMEDIAN PAULA POUNDSTONE TO A LITTLE DITTY ON DEPRESSION. IT WENT SOMETHING LIKE THIS:

    "IF I WAS IN THE BEDROOM IN BED WITH A PHYSICAL ILLNESS LIKE CANCER OR A HEART CONDITION, AND ALL THE FAMILY WAS IN THE LIVING ROOM. WHEN I DID GET UP OUT OF BED THEY WOULD ALL SAY 'LOOK AT HER, SHE'S SO BRAVE, SHE'S GETTING UP -- IN HER CONDITION.' BUT WITH DEPRESSION IT'S NOT THE SAME. IF I AM I THE BEDROOM IN BED WITH A DEPRESSIVE EPISODE AND THE FAMILY WERE ALL IN THE LIVING ROOM THEY WOULD BE SAYING 'WHY DOESN'T SHE JUST GET UP! IF SHE WOULD JUST GET UP AND DO SOMETHING SHE'D FEEL BETTER...'"
  5. by   Youda
    Yes, there are other nurses with anxiety and/or depression.

    Personally, I don't "hide" anything from admin. I just don't tell them, because it's none of their business. I don't tell them when I'm on my period or when I fight with my boyfriend, either. It's none of their business.

    Admin is intolerant of everything, in my experience. If you have the flu, they're intolerant. If you call-in because of anything and everything, they're intolerant.

    Having said that, I will tell you that there have been a few times in my life when I worked for caring people who didn't treat me that way. They built up my self-esteem and gave me respect. So, don't put up with it. It doesn't matter if they understand or don't. Keep the focus on what YOU need. If your employer is contributing significantly to your depression/anxiety, then get the hell out of there!

    PM or email me if you want to talk more. Sounds like you need a friend, carpe de em.
  6. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by Youda
    Personally, I don't "hide" anything from admin. I just don't tell them, because it's none of their business. I don't tell them when I'm on my period or when I fight with my boyfriend, either. It's none of their business.
    Some people think you cannot hide depression, that clinical depression is strong stuff. Iy'd want your courtosey extension to tell me if you are emotionally unstable and could be off. If you work with or near me, your mood is my business. Pretty much people are my business. Being "yourself" can not include trashing other people with non-verbal.

    Do the meds give you breathing space? I am so afraid to ask about the way psych meds make you feel. Is it like a buzz? Can you feel it when it works?
  7. by   micro
    Originally posted by carpe_de_em
    SORRY ABOUT THAT -- HIT THE WRONG KEY AND OFF IT WENT. HERE IS WHAT I REALLY WANTED TO KNOW
    ARE THERE OTHER NURESE OUT THERE WITH SEVERE DEPRESSION AND/OR ANXIETY DISORDER?
    DO THEY FEEL LIKE THEY HAVE TO HIDE IT FROM ADMINISTRATION?
    DO THEY FEEL LIKE NURSING ADMINISTRATION IS VERY INTOLERANT WITH THESE DISORDERS.
    I HEARD COMEDIAN PAULA POUNDSTONE TO A LITTLE DITTY ON DEPRESSION. IT WENT SOMETHING LIKE THIS:
    "IF I WAS IN THE BEDROOM IN BED WITH A PHYSICAL ILLNESS LIKE CANCER OR A HEART CONDITION, AND ALL THE FAMILY WAS IN THE LIVING ROOM. WHEN I DID GET UP OUT OF BED THEY WOULD ALL SAY 'LOOK AT HER, SHE'S SO BRAVE, SHE'S GETTING UP -- IN HER CONDITION.' BUT WITH DEPRESSION IT'S NOT THE SAME. IF I AM I THE BEDROOM IN BED WITH A DEPRESSIVE EPISODE AND THE FAMILY WERE ALL IN THE LIVING ROOM THEY WOULD BE SAYING 'WHY DOESN'T SHE JUST GET UP! IF SHE WOULD JUST GET UP AND DO SOMETHING SHE'D FEEL BETTER...'"

    can only answer for myself

    carpe-de-em

    1) yes
    2) yes
    3) yes and no

    thx for the paula poundstone "take"
    so agree.........

    yes, people's health and mood do affect me if you are my teamworker and i am yours......
    it is why we must all take care of our health to be good nurses,
    take care of #1, because otherwise you are of no good to anyone else.......
    but the stigma of depression and other ......... still exists even in health care, sad to say from lateral team members to administration........
    it is a fine line you walk and choices you make when you choose to share.............

    Mario,
    I for one can only answer for myself. Legitimate question and not rudely asked at all.
    Do I feel it when it works, no not really. But I can tell when it is not working.
    Will share more, but publicly only share (probably way too much already about micro).

    Mental health is still an area that even in health care, we have so much stigma about, I for one am glad that people such as carpe-de-em and Mario and others continue to raise questions about it.
    We are part of a whole. If we do understand all aspects of our physical/mental/cognitive being, we cannot effectively work as nurses or within this world in an effective way, either professionally or personally.

    micro and out
  8. by   Youda
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci


    Some people think you cannot hide depression, that clinical depression is strong stuff. Iy'd want your courtosey extension to tell me if you are emotionally unstable and could be off. If you work with or near me, your mood is my business. Pretty much people are my business. Being "yourself" can not include trashing other people with non-verbal.

    Do the meds give you breathing space? I am so afraid to ask about the way psych meds make you feel. Is it like a buzz? Can you feel it when it works?
    My BON publishes its position that it is up to each nurse, "through a process of self-examination," to determine if s/he is fit for duty and able to perform responsibly and prudently. I take that charge very seriously, as a matter of ethical responsibility. If I'm at work, I can do the job. If I'm not there, I can't. It's that simple. I'd hope anyone suffering from any illness do the same.

    We could spend hours talking about people's moods and how they affect their co-workers. But, as a member of a health care TEAM, I expect my co-workers to treat me with respect, as I try to treat them. That means that when they come to work upset because of whatever, I try to be supportive or ignore it, depending on the situation. I've worked many a shift when someone else's problems affected the unit. Someone going through a divorce, just finding out your kid is on drugs, etc. Not everyone is going to be HAPPY all the time. I give myself permission to be human, just as I allow others to be human. That being said, I am much more concerned about my patient care, recognizing that relationships with coworkers are important, too. I don't feel the least little bit of need to tell a co-worker about "depression" or anything else. The kind of immobilizing depression that you fear will result in a co-worker being dangerous around you wouldn't happen. When depression is that bad, the person wouldn't be able to get out of bed or leave the house. They'd call in sick.

    Depression can be hidden easily. I do it all the time. In fact, I make special efforts to be more cheerful when I'm at my lowest. I may close my front door at the end of the day and break down into tears, but no one else is going to see it, especially my patients.

    To answer your other question. Can you feel an antibiotic working? How about lanoxin? How about Micardis? No, you can't "feel" it working. What those meds do, as well as antidepressants, is restore the body to closer homeostasis. Don't confuse antidepressants with control substances which act in an entirely different way and give a false sense of well-being or elation.
  9. by   mamabear
    Speaking only for myself:
    I have severe depression, for which I take Effexor XR and Remeron. This combination was found to be the best for the insomnia that often accompanies depression, and for mood swings. I also have a terrific shrink.
    My immediate superior and two trusted coworkers are aware of my disease. Even though I work on a psych unit, there are few coworkers I would trust with my "secret".
    I have no doubt that administration would be less than understanding, were they to find out I'm depressive.
    To add to the mix, I'm also a recovering addict (three-and-a-half years clean by the grace of God)
    We need to abandon our antiquated notions about psychiatric illness: nobody hides their "mental" family members in the attic anymore, and we deserve at least that much consideration among ourselves. I'm also epileptic and have seizured three times at work Nobody gave it a second thought, beyond some of the patients freaking out about the blood and incontinence.
  10. by   Audreyfay
    I have been reading with interest, the posts in this topic. At one time I thought that the person who was depressed was somehow weak, maybe even a little crazy. But then, it happened to me. It seems there is usually an instigating event that creates a chemical imbalance. The imbalance is not nice. I believe that more women suffer from this chemical imbalance than men do. But is it a wonder! Our bodies are bounced up and jerked down like rag dolls, as our hormones surge and ebb.
    I just put up with the depression until my daughter ended up going into couselling (teenager). When they got their hooks in me, it turned my life around. I went into therapy too. It was a great experience. I emptied so many bags. I finally started to understand who I was. I recommend therapy for everyone. It definitely gives you a different perspective on the world. In fact, I can usually tell, just by talking with someone, if they have had therapy or not.
    Back to the antidepressants. I took antidepressants for about 7 months. AHA! Is that how everyone else felt? I no longer cried at a drop of a hat. My hormonal cycle no longer made me cry and fly off the handle for several days/month. I was able to enjoy, instead of cry. After going off them for 2 years, I decided to go back on. If taking a pill every day can help me enjoy my life, instead of cry, I'm for it! Like mentioned before, you can't tell when you take it, but you sure can when you don't!
    Afterall....my icon isn't Eeyore for nothing. He gets sad frequently because his tail keeps falling off. I still get sad, but my hubby is there to find the tail and put it back on.
  11. by   NurseGirlKaren
    How true, AudreyFay. When taking psych in nursing school, I thought alot of this mental illness stuff, and especially depression, was a weakness. Yeah, everybody has bad days, get over it. Major depression was an excuse for a lot of people, I thought.

    But oh, how attitudes change. Was on meds in the past, counseling. Off meds for a couple years at this point, only counseling on a prn basis (and it's been a while). I didn't realize at first was going on with me, but now, looking back....

    It's nice to know I feel great now! Don't need meds, but that doesn't mean that that works for everyone. And it was easy for me to recognize it in my husband too. But we're both good now!

    Hang in there, all.
  12. by   ktwlpn
    I find the difference in viewpoints between the men and women of the board very interesting.I would like to see more men respond.I perceive that many men feel that depression is almost self-inflicted...The attitude seems to be "Snap out of it" by going out and having fun ....or "It's a monthly mood thing" I have seen husbands of chronically ill women with terminal dx have this attitude...In that case I think it is clearly denial...But what about our group here?Any one have any thoughts?
  13. by   prn nurse
    Another cardinal symptom of depression is irritability...aggression,....hostility.

    When you read posts and feel like saying, ""Geez, lighten up !" , there's a good chance that poster is suffering from depression.

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