Nurses with depression - page 2

by grandmawrinkle

Are you one of them? What is your story? Me: dysthymic disorder, likely depressive sx from the age of 10-12. Major depressive episodes: 2. Other psychiatric comorbidities: anorexia nervosa (currently, in longstanding... Read More


  1. 6
    I've dealt with depression all of my adult life. I don't see going on meds as a sign of failure but rather that I have learned how to manage my condition sucessfully. In my younger days I would put off dealing with symptoms until it became severe and at times really affected my functioning. Now I recognize the early signs of a "slide" downward and know what meds work for me and am able to get it managed. Usually I am able to wean off after 6-12 months on the med and may go years between episodes.
    to you grandmawrinkle. Hang in there and keep trying - it will improve!
    People such as Sube with remarks about "big girl panties" and "just fake it" truly have no concept of the condition and do others a disservice by feeding into the negative loop of feelings. Would they tell me the same thing regarding my diabetes or thyroid condition? It's just as much a real condition!
  2. 10
    Hi, GW!

    I hope you feel better soon. When my mama went on anti-depressants, the doctor explained to her that they were like insulin for Type 2 DM. Her body wasn't producing enough "happy" so she had to have a supplement. That helped her get over the stigma that somehow she was responsible for her depression.

    I really enjoy you, GW, so keep fighting the good fight, OK?

    Last edit by canigraduate on Aug 25, '10 : Reason: fixed smilie
    Hoozdo, latebloomer74, pedsrnjc, and 7 others like this.
  3. 1
    I have just gotten through a new book written by Mark Hyman, MD called The Ultra Mind Solution. In it he talked about depression, ADHD, dementia, and a number of other things. Pretty much, he explained that many of these issues we face are diet related (high frustose corn syrup, high mercury content in fish, etc.) I think it is a wonderful alternative to conventional medical thinking. If your body isn't feeling right how else might that manifest? It's worth a read, and it changed my thinking on a lot of things.
    carolmaccas66 likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from LTC RN jc
    I know many nurses with mental health issues, mine is anxiety and panic attacks (Yes, and I try to avoid the ER...but somtimes the chest pain is too bad, sorry to all the ER nurses out there). I know a nurse with major depression and one with bipolar disease. We manage. Bipolar friend does very well. Depressed friend struggles, calls in often and has some trouble, but is one of the best nurses I've ever met.

    I lost a job R/T panic attacks, I couldn't cope with the pressure, so I quit spontaneously. The irony was that I was often complimented at that job about how calm I was in stressfull situations. People have no idea what goes on inside. I now have a very mellow job (rare, hard to find in LTC), my anxiety still gives me trouble and sometimes I feel like a failure, but I push on.

    You are not alone, get the help you need and know, you are not alone. Hugs.
    Hi since you mentioned panic attacks/anxiety. I just had a quick question. How do employers feel about their nurses taking benzo's or other things for panic attacks and anxiety? I read somewhere, maybe here, that BON don't allow nurses to work when taking narc's for pain, even chronic pain. So I was wondering like is it an issue as a nurse if one takes benzo's on a PRN basis?
  5. 1
    Quote from nyteshade
    I have just gotten through a new book written by Mark Hyman, MD called The Ultra Mind Solution. In it he talked about depression, ADHD, dementia, and a number of other things. Pretty much, he explained that many of these issues we face are diet related (high frustose corn syrup, high mercury content in fish, etc.) I think it is a wonderful alternative to conventional medical thinking. If your body isn't feeling right how else might that manifest? It's worth a read, and it changed my thinking on a lot of things.
    So does this doctor blame high-fructose corn syrup and mercury for the really great aspects of ADHD, too? Sorry I'm being a bit punchy, but ADHD is sort of awesome in many ways.

    OP--I found Wellbutrin worked wonders for my longstanding depression, but that's because it was actually treating my long undiagnosed and untreated ADHD, a major factor in my depression. Is it possible that there an underlying cause in your case that hasn't been discovered?
    carolmaccas66 likes this.
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    Quote from subee
    If you're not happy - fake it. Just smiling makes a big difference. You see yourself in your reflection on others. Dance a half hour every day - with yourself or better, with your pet. They'll love it too.
    Right. Except for those times that I can't get out of bed. And those times that I can't stop crying. No, there's no faking it here, especially now, without a job. There's only, real, serious depression that isn't helped by "faking it". Thanks so much for minimalizing how I feel. :icon_roll
    nola1202, imintrouble, need2chill, and 7 others like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from cb_rn
    Do you keep going off medication because of lack of effectiveness?
    No, pretty much I do it because I don't want to be on psychiatric medications for the rest of my life, and at the time, I am feeling OK. I have been off meds for a year+ on a couple of occasions. I keep hoping that at some point, my life will even out enough for me to take good enough care of myself to not need the pills.

    Quote from dudette10
    Let me guess: you're sick of not feeling "normal," but when you go back on antidepressants to feel normal, you also feel like a failure because you want to be able to feel normal without the help of meds.

    I admire you. I really do.
    Yep. Generally speaking, I just feel like a failure, and it's not just because of needing medication. The meds fix it, but there is still that thing in the back of your head that is telling you that you shouldn't need them. Thank you for being encouraging.

    Quote from subee
    put on your big girl panties and get on with it. It's the way we're wired. We were probably not happy go lucky babies.
    I have tried the big girl panties on, and they give me a wedgie. I've tried hard, and I can do it....for a finite amount of time....like maybe, two days.

    I do agree with you that is how we are wired, though. I can't imagine being different than this.

    Quote from Sonjailana
    Sometimes it's better, sometimes it's worse, but if you're still going to school, work, and being a Mommy, you're doing it!
    Yeah, I guess I am. Perhaps not as effectively as I would like, but I guess I am.

    Quote from mustlovepoodles
    I've suffered with depression for about 38 years. It took two serious hospitalizations to get me stabilized. I take my drugs pretty much happily because it keeps me from going all manic on everybody.
    Mania is absolutely not my problem. Sometimes, I wish it was....I understand it from an academic perspective, but to get that high....would be interesting.

    Quote from samanthaeh76
    Her body wasn't producing enough "happy" so she had to have a supplement. That helped her get over the stigma that somehow she was responsible for her depression.
    Thanks for that....I'm not sure if I can ever view antidepressants as a "supplement" ... but in this day and age, seriously, why do I feel so damn bad about taking a stupid little blue pill? It's JUST A PILL. It's not like I'm....IDK, doing something illegal.

    Quote from applescruffette
    ADHD, a major factor in my depression. Is it possible that there an underlying cause in your case that hasn't been discovered?
    I don't think so. Dysthymic disorder has been horrifically accurate for me, unfortunately. I don't have hyperactivity, or attention problems. I am a pretty clear cut case of just being a low-ish mood kind of person. The only thing that I think that I may/may not have had worked up appropriately is that the MMPI has said in the past that I may have anger issues (it's been a number of years since I have taken the MMPI, though...at least 8.) Now....I am not a lash-er out-er and have never had consequences of any of that sort of behavior. So....I'm not really on board with that.
  8. 0
    Howdy
    I do sympathise, and I mean sympathise cos I have neurotic family members with manic depression, and often wondered if I have it too. I too get very depressed (not going into why) but am on Escitalopram, as I get seasonal affective disorder (SAD) as well in winter.
    I basically moved to get away from my family as they really depressed me. I don't contact them. I am of course not happy about it, but living near/with them was a hundred times worse.
    I am studying mental health and I'm not going to be so pompous as to tell you I have an answer to your problem (no-one does, really). But depression has always really interested me, not because so many people suffer from it, but to try to find the root cause/s. However many people I have looked after say nothing has CAUSED their depression, they are just born with it - it is something inside of them.
    Have you ever written a diary, or just wrote down what you think may cause/contribute to this depression? That has helped me. I know one cause of my depression is my family (we have never been close in our family), and family is a major staple of self worth in many people's lives. Have you always felt depressed? Do certain events/TV programs/situations etc stress you out or depress you? Have you tried changing your thinking or does religion help maybe? Do you have trouble coping with everyday situations?
    I think much more study needs to be done on depression and the fact that it is not taken seriously by many health professionals. I too have seen Dr's who couldn't care less that I was depressed, sitting in their office crying, they just throw meds at you and say 'come back and see me in 2 weeks'. A Dr friend of mine said that's because local Dr's don't know what else to do - maybe.
    I have always said there should always be special nurses/Dr's 24 hour staffed clinics for people who have depression. Maybe we are much more conscious of it cos of more advertising and awareness. But many of my patients told me the meds don't help them and they have tried counselling etc, nothing seems to work for them. I often wonder if there is some hormone that hasn't been discovered, or it's our meaningless, hectic lives we live that causes all this? Maybe we get depressed cos we have left the simple things behind about what really matters in life. I don't know.
    I can only tell you what helps me. I like to write and do yoga/pilates or simple stretches as this gets the blood flowing. Shopping in op shops is great too, as I find good bargains and nothing makes me happier than saving money! I love reading and going on good internet chat sites, like this one. That way I can choose when I want to talk to people or not. I take long, hot showers to relax me. I try to get more sleep now. I take multivitamins - including Vit D. I also have a half a glass of wine occasionally at night, and that relaxes me too. My life is by no means perfect but these things help a little.
    It's hard to get a balance nowadays. Life is so busy and people don't have time for each other now. That is one of the problems of our modern society I think.
    Email me on here if you want to talk, I am usually near my laptop - you are not alone!
  9. 1
    I think doing your best to manage difficult symptoms is a good thing. To evaluate yourself and decide that you need a little help and to go out and find it is a good thing. Take the best care of yourself that you can, don't stop trying! Good luck!
    mrsmamabear2002 likes this.
  10. 1
    OP, I think you are one of many. I am too. I have chronic depression, PTSD and a generalised anxiety disorder, with borderline personality traits thrown in.

    I can't function without my medication - I take cipramil and seroquel. Have tried many others but at the moment this is what works for me. I've been in hospital 3 times and have been seriously suicidal. I've come to the conclusion that this is what's best for me and for those who think putting on big girls panties is gonna make a difference - well they can go jump in a lake.

    I don't cope with change well and at the moment it's effecting me badly. I've just completed my nursing course and am having a hard time finding a job (Australia is just as bad as the US for new grads).

    Good luck with your meds and I assure you that you are not a failure.

    Chris
    mustlovepoodles likes this.


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