Job Satisfaction: Can it be real in this field? - page 4

by thelittledoe | 5,771 Views | 42 Comments

I see a lot of people starting threads about how much they hate their jobs. In fact, I think I see a lot more people on here complaining about their careers than being thankful that they have a job in the economic circumstances.... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from tigerlogic
    I work in a hospital (currently CNA/nursing student, so yes, I'm also green) and the majority of the floors seem to have pretty happy nurses. Things I see at my hospital that I don't hear a lot about on the boards are nurses really advocating for each other's dinner breaks and offering help when someone is swamped. Nurse managers care a lot about nurses having enough time to sit down and eat (research shows it leads to fewer errors) as well as having no tolerance for bullying and negative relationships. The culture of the place has really strong values of 'managing up' (i.e. always speaking highly of one another) and being friendly to each other. "How are you doing? Do you need any help?" is a common question, both among nurses and also back and forth between CNAs and nurses.
    There is a huge effort to do things safely with two or three people and lift equipment such that there are few to no staff or pt injuries. It's also a place where the nurses are ok with the fact that patient experience is important. We have vigil trays and lots of support for families when a loved one is at the end, and find time to make people feel safe and comfortable. I know that some nurses on these boards feel that's not important for our jobs, but I'm happy to work for a place that values that. Most common complaints of staff seem to be about scheduling or not getting the holidays you wanted, but overall, most of that seems to work out.

    Needless to say, retention is high and it's very hard to get a job there. Needless to say, those aren't the nurses posting loudly here. But they do exist.
    This is wonderful!!! The things you have mentioned are all I would need to make me a happy nurse. Yes crappy patients and families are a pain, but it would be so much easier to deal with that in this type of supportive share the load culture. Sign me up to work here!
  2. 0
    Quote from NurseFrustrated
    Wow, imagine that. On two out of four shifts this week, I got no dinner break at all. Had to shove a Luna bar down while standing in the med room getting the med pass ready. Our nurse managers don't care. But imagine if they didn't get a break one day. Heaven forbid.
    The only time I have ever gotten regular breaks was the one year I spent on day shift. Every night shift job I have had.....eat at your station, but don't let management find out! Want to leave the floor? Your patient's better be stable because no one is gonna watch them for you!
  3. 0
    Quote from tigerlogic
    I work in a hospital (currently CNA/nursing student, so yes, I'm also green) and the majority of the floors seem to have pretty happy nurses. Things I see at my hospital that I don't hear a lot about on the boards are nurses really advocating for each other's dinner breaks and offering help when someone is swamped. Nurse managers care a lot about nurses having enough time to sit down and eat (research shows it leads to fewer errors) as well as having no tolerance for bullying and negative relationships. The culture of the place has really strong values of 'managing up' (i.e. always speaking highly of one another) and being friendly to each other. "How are you doing? Do you need any help?" is a common question, both among nurses and also back and forth between CNAs and nurses.
    There is a huge effort to do things safely with two or three people and lift equipment such that there are few to no staff or pt injuries. It's also a place where the nurses are ok with the fact that patient experience is important. We have vigil trays and lots of support for families when a loved one is at the end, and find time to make people feel safe and comfortable. I know that some nurses on these boards feel that's not important for our jobs, but I'm happy to work for a place that values that. Most common complaints of staff seem to be about scheduling or not getting the holidays you wanted, but overall, most of that seems to work out.

    Needless to say, retention is high and it's very hard to get a job there. Needless to say, those aren't the nurses posting loudly here. But they do exist.
    ^ THIS.
    A lot of people desire to work in places like this...are there places like this that are scare??? I believe that is debatable.

    I've fortunate to work in places with high turnover, low turnover, everything in between. I can honestly say in the 12 years I've been in healthcare, I have been close to burnout, and I have taken it upon my self to with take days off or put myself in another position to do something else. I have either been a float nurse, or had two part time jobs to change it up. I don't do drama and communicate effectively and advocate for myself and for my patients. I have felt out how Drs react to their pt load, how they communicated, and tailored how to interact with them to get things done. I have "come to Jesus@ meetings with pts and their family members to get a plan together-nothing without a clear plan will not work to your benefit, I always say.I've worked in ER, Tele/Step-down, Traumatic Rehab, Homecare and Peds. Small places as well as large ones.

    I currently work at a facility that does have a high retention rate, and they honestly remain flexible to the changes in nursing, promote team work and autonomy, and are working and tweaking to help create a culture where nurses feel empowered. There are people who leave but desire to come back, and have to wait in the back of the line with others.

    I have remained the same with my methods, but have grown as a nurse...but I still advocate for myself. That's what saves ME.
  4. 0
    I work at a great facility, with a night shift team that works together like an eight-day clock. I really like my co-workers, and seldom see my manager or the doctors, which suits me. I'm leaving nursing in a few months and don't plan to ever return.

    I got burned out a few years ago -- I think burnout and a depressive episode met and the result was very difficult to work through. By now I'm just tired of caring for people. 85% of my patients are decent people, but I'm very tired of everyone needing things from me constantly. As for the other 15% -- the mean, manipulative, emotional sinkholes of individuals -- I can hardly stand working with them anymore. Some people think they can just treat a nurse like dirt on the bottoms of their shoes.

    I do think it's possible to be satisfied in the nursing field. I've known people who were. For myself, though, I can truthfully say I'd rather work any other job than nursing.
  5. 0
    Quote from brandy1017
    Don't condemn those of us still working in the trenches! The problem is that outside of the state of CA there is no limit to how many patients a nurse can have! On top of that we are expected to do everyone elses job ie CNA, PCA, HUC, housekeeping....So spare me your self righteous attitude!
    I never meant to condemn anyone or come off as self-righteous for that matter. I was just curious to see what some major complaints all are. I know I am not a nurse, but I do work bedside with 12-18 patients as a PCA and I help out my nurses as much as I can and they are thankful for it. I can see just how hard it can be for nurses now that I've seen so many replies, but my main question was whether or not a nurse could truly be satisfied. The golden answer: it depends. In situations such as yours where you are expected to do the work of everyone and get paid for the work of one, it is easy to see how it could be frustrating. I wanted to apologize for coming off as offensive to you.

    Quote from NurseFrustrated
    Some co-workers get to be very lazy and sit there socializing while I bust my ass (and on my unit that is usally a CNA or unit clerk...no offense, but it's the truth.)
    But I have never seen a PCA or nursing assistant on my unit miss a break. Ever. It happens to the nurses on my unit all the time. The difference is the level of responsibility and paperwork.
    If the patient falls and is injured, it's on me, the nurse, not the PCA.
    Having to stay over and hour or more after my shift ends doing paperwork that I could not do because of all the patient care, while the CNA always gets to leave on time.
    The fact is, you have no idea and you cannot talk unless you have actually been a nurse. As a PCA/CNA or a new grad nurse who hasn't worked yet you really don't know.
    Once again, I'm sorry if I sounded as if I had "an idea" or if I have a right "to talk". I was merely trying to weigh the pros and cons of a nursing career. I did not mean to offend any of the nurses on the website and I know you mentioned that you also mean no offense to any CNAs or unit clerks. It seems that your answer to my question regarding other staff would be that they can lead to poor job satisfaction.

    Thanks to everyone else who answered honestly, so I can weigh out the pros and cons. It seems as though most of you are highly satisfied with your jobs despite a few hiccups within the healthcare system and within the workplace in general. As for everyone else I can assume that the positive side must outweigh the negative because most of you plan to continue as nurses. Thanks again!
  6. 1
    OP, I don't think you condemned anyone or came off as self-righteous. I think you asked questions because you wanted honest answers to how nurses feel about their careers. I am a new nurse and this is a second career for me. My perception is that YES there are many things wrong with nursing and healthcare in general. However, there are many positives about being a nurse that go beyond the paycheck. There are good days and bad days...on the bad days I try to look for something positive in every situation. By no means am I saying I am always positive and happy. Yet, I sometimes think some people tend to dwell on the negative. I don't allow myself to be a doormat to coworkers, patients, and families, but I avoid taking things personally.. A previous post mentioned the nurse getting "yelled" at for everything from water refills to med pass. I think some people are too sensitive to the way they are talked to by others. Our patients are sick, in pain, and scared...if we perceive requests for water and pillow fluffs as yelling, we need to look closer at ourselves. Maybe the patient is yelling but it is more likely from their circumstances than the fact they have an empty water cup, in my experience a moment to show you care and offer a smile makes a difference. Just my 2 cents. Good luck to you OP.
    thelittledoe likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Nurses with a higher degree should get more respect?
    Why not, if they earned that degree? But you and I BOTH KNOW, it won't belong that that will get brushed aside by the reality of how the nurse practices. Heck, at least it should.

    I mean, I respect those that worked more time and had to cram in more knowledge that I--MDs or DO for example--but that only lasts for so long. Once I see their practice, that's where the respect is really going to come in to play.

    But believe it or not, at least for a number of folks, more education is NOT a bad thing. I can make you a better practitioner than you were before, IF, you apply it well, and then continue to grow and have good sense and integrity.

    I mean there is more to it than a title, but for some people, they learn for the moment, get through their education, and pretty much forget 90% of what they learned--I mean beyond the normal curve of forgetting. For those folks, well, other than a title, their degree really didn't get them much in terms of overall value. I say a truly educated person continues in being educated, no matter what their degree or how long they have practiced.


    Outside of backing it up though, the degree will not carry much weight, except to certain employers and the political-agenda-pushers in nursing.
  8. 0
    Quote from thelittledoe
    I never meant to condemn anyone or come off as self-righteous for that matter. I was just curious to see what some major complaints all are. I know I am not a nurse, but I do work bedside with 12-18 patients as a PCA and I help out my nurses as much as I can and they are thankful for it. I can see just how hard it can be for nurses now that I've seen so many replies, but my main question was whether or not a nurse could truly be satisfied. The golden answer: it depends. In situations such as yours where you are expected to do the work of everyone and get paid for the work of one, it is easy to see how it could be frustrating. I wanted to apologize for coming off as offensive to you.



    Once again, I'm sorry if I sounded as if I had "an idea" or if I have a right "to talk". I was merely trying to weigh the pros and cons of a nursing career. I did not mean to offend any of the nurses on the website and I know you mentioned that you also mean no offense to any CNAs or unit clerks. It seems that your answer to my question regarding other staff would be that they can lead to poor job satisfaction.

    Thanks to everyone else who answered honestly, so I can weigh out the pros and cons. It seems as though most of you are highly satisfied with your jobs despite a few hiccups within the healthcare system and within the workplace in general. As for everyone else I can assume that the positive side must outweigh the negative because most of you plan to continue as nurses. Thanks again!

    You are very wise to weigh all the pros and cons. Do an opportunity cost analysis as well. It can help clarify things.
  9. 0
    If I could just work with the patients and never see management I would be VERY happy. Its kinda funny considering on the weekend and holidays everything runs really smooth. But during the week days its a mess. And the only difference is that management is there.

    On the weekend we can actually be nurses. Be with the patients and families. Dealing with care issues and trying new things. During the week it seems like all that we do is give management updates on pt conditions that they would read if they pulled th chart out.
  10. 0
    I was relieved to read your comment, NurseFrustrated. I am also very frustrated. On one hand I don't want to over-burden my PCA/CNA but on the other hand, I don't have enough hands or time to do their job and mine. As a new nurse, this is beyond discouraging. I am beginning to think I chose the wrong profession! I hope I can get over the hurdles in front of me but feel like the only thing that can be sacrificed is individual patient care.


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