I am about to quit with no notice and no warning - page 2

by okkennk28 | 8,791 Views | 25 Comments

I hope someone here can identify. I am a certified case manager who is a sub-contractor. A lot of people thing I have the dream job. I don't, nobody seems to understand why I would want to quit. It's because they want case... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from AssociateDegree
    Even the Pope gave 2 weeks' notice.

    Listen to the advice the previous posters have given you.

    LOL!
    lalacb123, Penguin67, and netglow like this.
  2. 3
    Although it isn't a requirement to give an employer a two week notice, it's considered respectful and courteous to your co-workers to allow that employer time to find a replacement, as a previous poster stated. Never burn bridges, regardless if you're going to cross them again or not. A quick quit can easily turn into a "no for rehire" when a prospective employer's HR rep calls to verify your previous employment.
    Last edit by ILoveSpring&Fall on Mar 6, '13 : Reason: Grammar
    Marshall1, katherine100, and Meriwhen like this.
  3. 1
    I have to agree with all of the above. Nobody is hiring; they are just spreading their existing employees thinner. Leaving without notice will just get you a 'wouldn't rehire', which can put you at the back of a field of qualified applicants.
    Marshall1 likes this.
  4. 1
    You have to do what you have to...but remember that this isn't the early 2000s, when jobs were being thrown at nurses. The market is a lot harsher, even for experienced nurses. IMO, if possible, don't quit without giving notice and/or having another job lined up.

    In addition, not giving notice is unprofessional and may come back to haunt you.

    Best of luck whatever you decide.
    Marshall1 likes this.
  5. 4
    Quote from ILoveSpring&Fall
    Although it isn't a requirement to give an employer a two week notice, it's considered respectful and courteous to your co-workers to allow that employer time to find a replacement, as a previous poster stated. Never burn bridges, regardless if you're going to cross them again or not. A quick quit can easily turn into a "no for rehire" when a prospective employer's HR rep calls to verify your previous employment.
    In my experience with a number of employers, it isn't a matter of "can easily turn into" DNR status, it's a given that quitting without notice will get a DNR flag on your record. Also, people here are throwing around "two weeks notice" like it's carved in stone somewhere that that is appropriate notice, but growing numbers of employers nowadays are expecting/requiring more than two weeks. Before turning in a resignation (or even starting to job hunt), it's a smart idea to check your employee handbook or company policy website and see what the employer's expectations are for notice when you're resigning.
    VivaLasViejas, Marshall1, NRSKarenRN, and 1 other like this.
  6. 3
    Try to remove your emotion and consider things objectively. Would you hire someone who walked out on the job? Not when there are many candidates out there. Be professional and give the required notice. You might need to go back to that job one day, and you will definitely need a reference from that employer. Just stick it out.
    Marshall1, VivaLasViejas, and elkpark like this.
  7. 8
    It isn't about what's professional or moral. If they've treated you like crap, then you owe them nothing.

    It's not about what you owe them. It's about what you owe yourself. It's not in your self interest to be jobless with a great big hole on your resume.
  8. 3
    Oh, and I know a lot of people think you could just not list this employer on your resume, especially if you haven't worked there long or if you've had another part time job concurrently or something. That makes sense on the surface, but.......

    nursing is a surprisingly small world. That nurse manager of the company you skipped out on may show up in another job down the line. Don't assume just because you've quit a job, that it's the last you'll see of your former coworkers. They'll pop up again when you least expect them.
  9. 1
    Never burn your bridges, you never know when you need to cross it again in the future. Its only two weeks, hang in there. You wouldn't want it to someday, somehow bite you in the *** when you are moving forward in your career.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Mar 6, '13 : Reason: disguised profanity
    Marshall1 likes this.
  10. 0
    That is true for ltc especially.


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