Better living--and working--through chemistry. - page 2

by dudette10 3,544 Views | 20 Comments

I was at my lowest. My absolute lowest. Anxiety would cloud my every move when I was at work. I had a dull ache in my chest for my entire shift. I would dread going back to work. My days off were spent doing the bare minimum... Read More


  1. 0
    I think there is a higher percentage of nurses on anti-depressants than other people and I believe it's due to many factors including higher percentage of women nurses (women roughly twice as likely to have depression compared to men), high stress job and nurses' awareness of depression diagnosis and treatment.

    My husband suffers from depression and it took him about a decade to acknowledge that it was a disease and not a personal weakness or failure. There were some scary times until then when he would decide he didn't need the meds. I would highly recommend finding an experienced and capable therapist.

    I've known others who only needed meds for episodic depression then they weaned off of them. It definitely has side effects. I also know a former co-worker who was pressured into going off anti-depressants because the spouse didn't like the sexual side effects. Thankfully this coworker survived a subsequent suicide attempt. I'm just saying. . .
  2. 0
    Good for you! I am glad you feel joyful again.
  3. 1
    That's great news! But sad that so many have to do this just to work as a nurse or MD. I think that it's not that crazy these days to think that it might be prudent just to start taking meds on your first day of work... as prophy - cause there are so many that don't seek treatment but really need to. DX anxiety/depressive disorder is inevitable, because it's fall out from the whole PTSD that goes with nursing and medicine. It's crazy, but seems unavoidable the way healthcare has become so awful. I just posted on a thread about nursing school debt too. So many think this is a profession where the patients may be tough but "we" healthcare folks RNs/MDs just are such a team and have each other's back at work......
    brandy1017 likes this.
  4. 4
    One of things that happen in nursing is we tend to take on our patient and family emotions and problems internally. There is a term for this and I can t remember. Combine this emotional stuff and our own stuff and the actual work takes alot out of us.
    They dont tell us these things in nursing school and how to protect our own psyches and souls.
    I think taking care of ourselves is one key component . Eating well and exercising and sometimes that can be tough in this busy world but we can try. I worked at a hospital that offered meditation during various times of the day. Gosh this helped me so much.
    Just to quite my mind and some deep breathing. It was like a small holiday for my body and soul.
    I lasted 42 years in nursing and so many people asked me why I retired @ 62 and it is so hard to explain the many reasons that I had to . It was taking a toll on my body and mind . They say I am too young. True, but I just could not offer my patients good care when I myself needed to take better care of myself. I wish all those in the profession the best of luck and health .
    leslie :-D, Hoozdo, VivaLasViejas, and 1 other like this.
  5. 4
    I think its so sad that a healing profession/calling leaves so many dealing with depression/anxiety. Sort of a silent epidemic.
    But I am happy for the posters here who have sought and found help. Yay for us!
    Marshall1, BCgradnurse, leslie :-D, and 1 other like this.
  6. 6
    I think "shift" work plays into this issue....plays havoc with hormones, all of them......
    Marshall1, BCgradnurse, leslie :-D, and 3 others like this.
  7. 3
    Exact same story here, even down to the same SSRI, it's made all the difference in the world.
    dudette10, Marshall1, and VivaLasViejas like this.
  8. 0
    Moved to Stress Management.

    Glad you are feeling better.
  9. 3
    Quote from paddlelady
    One of things that happen in nursing is we tend to take on our patient and family emotions and problems internally. There is a term for this and I can t remember. Combine this emotional stuff and our own stuff and the actual work takes alot out of us.
    They dont tell us these things in nursing school and how to protect our own psyches and souls.
    I think taking care of ourselves is one key component . Eating well and exercising and sometimes that can be tough in this busy world but we can try. I worked at a hospital that offered meditation during various times of the day. Gosh this helped me so much.
    Just to quite my mind and some deep breathing. It was like a small holiday for my body and soul.
    I lasted 42 years in nursing and so many people asked me why I retired @ 62 and it is so hard to explain the many reasons that I had to . It was taking a toll on my body and mind . They say I am too young. True, but I just could not offer my patients good care when I myself needed to take better care of myself. I wish all those in the profession the best of luck and health .
    If I make it till age 62 in this profession, it'll be nothing short of a miracle. ~sigh~ The overwhelming and ever-increasing numbers of rules and regulations make it all but impossible to do a good job every day, no matter how hard I work, and I'm already exhausted---and I'm still a few months shy of 55.

    Then when I factor in the medical problems I battle daily, plus rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder, I can't help but wonder if those things would get better if I were to get out of the field entirely. And I have this horrid suspicion they might.
    Marshall1, BCgradnurse, and leslie :-D like this.
  10. 3
    cymbalta has been my life-saver.
    i had tried every ssri out there (and didn't gain weight) but they all eventually wore off.
    cymbalta is the first ad that has sustained me.

    it is true that this depression/anxiety can be exogenous...r/t external factors.
    if that is the case then yes, when the time is right (which you and your dr agree upon), then you can be weaned off.
    but if the depression is truly a chemical imbalance, then it'll likely be lifelong.

    i cannot emphasize enough, the need of a therapist that you fit with.
    you may have to interview a few but i assure you, there is someone out there where you will feel the rapport.

    i'm very happy for you dudette.
    life sounds good now.
    yay for you.

    leslie
    dudette10, Marshall1, and BCgradnurse like this.


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