I'll be blunt. . . .

  1. I've seen a bit of animosity on this forum towards nurses that aren't "local".

    When I was a bit younger, I lived in Hawaii for quite a few years. I worked on the local economy, and I felt accepted by the "locals". Hawaii was not the state of my birth, but for many years, I felt that it was the state that had adopted me.

    Yet in this forum, it seems like there is a certain amount of animosity towards the mainlanders that choose to come here and make Hawaii their chosen home.

    Why is that?

    Although I lived in Hawaii for many years, I am reluctant to bring my husband to the islands to make our home.

    I'm not kama'aina, but I would say that i was a malihini that chose to make Hawaii my new home, and I embraced the cultural idiosyncracies that make Hawaii unique. My best friends still live on the island, and I long for the day I can come "home".

    But I read this forum, and I feel that I may not be welcome when I do have the chance to return.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Slobgob
    "Yet in this forum, it seems like there is a certain amount of animosity towards the mainlanders that choose to come here and make Hawaii their chosen home.

    Why is that?"

    I've pondered this same question. I've noticed some of the same trends.

    Personally, I'm of the "flown here, not grown here" varietal. I struggle at times with acceptance being a haole guy in the nursing world. I started in Hawaii as a new grad. And although I bought a house here, paddle here, left all my old friends for new friends here... its still assumed by others that I'm temporary.

    My boss tells me this. This hurt my ability to get a new job back when I was looking. It was tough, and it was scary. Living in Hawaii without a job, waiting for incredibly slow HR departments to review a resume, and eventually being offered a rotating shift, floor floating, per diem job... as a new grad.

    That's why I tell bright-eyed new grads... "Think again. Really, think twice."

    Its not because of my apparent zenophobia... its because of my experience. Its because I still remember not sleeping at night worried that I left my plush California job market, left my friends, left my family... to pay an expensive rent with no job.

    As for others. What's the famous line? "Its the economy, stupid."

    That ole economy isn't doing so well. Gas is up, food is up, utilities are up, and job wages... aren't up. For every new person that comes to Hawaii:

    1) One less job for our own new grads. UH, HPU, KCC... every semester. We got plenty, and they can't get jobs.

    2) One less job vacancy, one more nurse. Less Demand, More supply.

    3) Tourism is down, hence patient census is down, hence nursing hours are down.

    Top it off with over-crowding, worse traffic, more development... you wonder why new people aren't welcomed with open arms.

    Its not zenophobia, not racism, not really... its my savings account. Simple as that.

    -Slobgob

    PS: If more nurses come, can I retire earlier? =)
  4. by   mcubed45
    what're you talking about? the local nurses that post on here haven't shown the least bit of animosity toward mainlanders. if you can cite me some examples it'd be helpful. i'm not sure if you're confusing realism with harshness. would you prefer they tell the hopeful new grads that there are lots of great opportunities for them to begin their careers here in hawaii? that's called lying i believe.
  5. by   MissIda
    We'll we are mainlanders moving back. HUbby feels more at home in Hawaii then anywhere else. I hope we get a warm or at least luke warm reception when we move back there. We are leaving our home in Socal our friends/jobs etc. It'll be scary but an adventure.
  6. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from kcalohagirl
    I've seen a bit of animosity on this forum towards nurses that aren't "local"...
    Yet in this forum, it seems like there is a certain amount of animosity towards the mainlanders that choose to come here and make Hawaii their chosen home.
    But I read this forum, and I feel that I may not be welcome when I do have the chance to return.
    You'll certainly be welcome in the general nursing threads
  7. by   kcalohagirl
    I actually think that giving new grads a realistic view of the employment situation is one of the best things this forum does. It seems like all you hear through nursing school is about how there is a nursing shortage "everywhere", and I think it may come as a surprise to a new grad that that isn't necessarily the case "everywhere". The tendency is to come out of nursing school with rose-colored glasses, and a good dose of reality is never a bad thing.

    I can't remember exactly what the comment made was, but it had something to do with the fact that a mainlander wouldn't be able to understand the culture as well, and wouldn't be as effective as a local nurse would be.

    That just struck me as odd. It seems to me that anyone with an open mind, anyone who is willing to adapt and learn more about the different cultures that are encountered on a day to day basis would do fine. Sure, there might be a bit of a learning curve when someone is new to the island, but it seems like after someone's lived there awhile there is no reason why they shouldn't adapt.

    Of course, not everyone does.

    I guess I probably didn't phrase the original statement particularly well, it just seemed from reading a few comments that it was the prevailing opinion that mainlanders wouldn't "fit in."

    Luckily, that wasn't my experience in my jobs I had when I lived there before, Hopefully it won't be when I move back.
  8. by   seasister
    I have just moved here from Florida and a new LPN. I haven't found a job yet and have resumes out but i also haven't found a rude person here... I will be blunt i did not picture this island to be so stacked up... so crowded... it wouldn't really bother me if someone is ****** that i am here.... i know I would be upset with new people moving to my paradise... and blocking up all the roads on a permanent basis... I am a white girl and and glad to be myself... i know what we did to the American Indians... I don't think my family will stay here even though that was the original plan 2 months ago... I don't even like to surf here... everywhere so far has been too crowded..I LOVE to surf but I would rather have colder, less sweet waves, and be able to relax on a few feet of beach that is my own.... too bad I gave my wet suit away when I left jax beach. I FEEL like an invader here, like I am standing in someone elses backyard without permission... it has NOTHING to do with the local attitudes....my HEART knows it's not right. So for now I have an address here and will enjoy the surf and make the best of the quiet moments i get alone on a secluded beach... but I don't think we will stay past our year lease.
  9. by   Dr.Nurse2b
    I married "Hawaiian" :heartbeat... I even have a tattoo of hibiscus and "Mau Loa" on my shoulder...My wife grow gardenias in our garden....LOL!

    My wife graduated the U of H and obviously lived there for several years...she is 1/2 and 1/2 ...

    I came up with the idea of pursing a career in Hawaii...she said "No way haole...you'd never make it...I had to move back."

    I don't know about this forum but after 6+ years of marriage to my island girl I am under the impression that Hawaii has no use for mainlanders.

    Paradise is tough I tell you!
  10. by   mcubed45
    Quote from kcalohagirl
    I can't remember exactly what the comment made was, but it had something to do with the fact that a mainlander wouldn't be able to understand the culture as well, and wouldn't be as effective as a local nurse would be.

    That just struck me as odd. It seems to me that anyone with an open mind, anyone who is willing to adapt and learn more about the different cultures that are encountered on a day to day basis would do fine. Sure, there might be a bit of a learning curve when someone is new to the island, but it seems like after someone's lived there awhile there is no reason why they shouldn't adapt.

    Of course, not everyone does.

    I guess I probably didn't phrase the original statement particularly well, it just seemed from reading a few comments that it was the prevailing opinion that mainlanders wouldn't "fit in."

    Luckily, that wasn't my experience in my jobs I had when I lived there before, Hopefully it won't be when I move back.
    ah ic ic. i'm sure as long as people keep an open mind they'll fit in just fine here. Hawaii is a bit unique in that there's such a diverse cultural background in such a tiny place. it can be quite a culture shock. i'm sure the reverse is true as well though. not all Hawaii born-and-raised locals can fit in when they move to the mainland.

    a lot of our techs here in xray are mainland/travel. some get along great and fit right in, others stick out like a sore thumb. it's really a matter of individual personality.
  11. by   northshore08
    Quote from kcalohagirl
    I can't remember exactly what the comment made was, but it had something to do with the fact that a mainlander wouldn't be able to understand the culture as well, and wouldn't be as effective as a local nurse would be.

    That just struck me as odd. It seems to me that anyone with an open mind, anyone who is willing to adapt and learn more about the different cultures that are encountered on a day to day basis would do fine. Sure, there might be a bit of a learning curve when someone is new to the island, but it seems like after someone's lived there awhile there is no reason why they shouldn't adapt.

    Of course, not everyone does.

    I guess I probably didn't phrase the original statement particularly well, it just seemed from reading a few comments that it was the prevailing opinion that mainlanders wouldn't "fit in."

    Luckily, that wasn't my experience in my jobs I had when I lived there before, Hopefully it won't be when I move back.
    That's not been my experience, either, and I think what you posted above is true. As a general rule, I think that some folk like to exclude rather than include. In my world, we all learn from each other and enjoy sharing our differences, whether it is food, language, daily routines, growing up, childrearing, etc, etc. My coworkers and friends (and patients, too, surprisingly!) are just as likely to ask me about my cultural practices as I am about theirs.

    Just like on the mainland, and all over the world, the hospitals here in Hawaii want to provide excellent patient care to the best of their ability. Their cultural competencies include all races and cultures, with no focus on any particular one, and they seem to concentrate their hiring on those nurses who can help provide that care. I think that is what is important.

    Hawaii is unique. There is no other place I have seen or heard of like it. And no matter if you are native, kama`aina, malihini or tourist, it changes you. I would guess for some, they would rather keep it all for themselves, and anything they can say or do to chase others away would help with that. And they would rather not be bothered with newbies who are just going to leave in a year or two.

    There are other agendas here, as well. Just look over the threads and you can easily see the sore places. Those are unique to Hawaii, too.

    JMHO, as I wait for my laundry to dry in the dryer because I am not allowed to hang it outside due to POA rules.
  12. by   northshore08
    Okay..Laundry is dry, I have re-read my own post. Much to my chagrin, it really sounds negative.

    I don't mean to be! Hawaii is a beautiful place filled with great people and I am as happy as I can be to have the chance to live here and experience all that I can! :spin: Certainly there are positives and negatives to living anywhere in the world, and each of us sees things differently.

    In the words of one of my patients last week,"I be your aunty now. You have home hea." (as she patted my cheek on the way out of the ED.)

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