Curious about the impending strike

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    Last edit by cardiacRN2006 on Feb 22, '09
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    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    This Sat. morning, Kauai nurses at Wilcox will strike. I was curious how many of you would cross the line, and why?
    They already have 60 replacement nurses signed up, so I know the nurses are out there. I am curious if any of you guys are online, and willing to tell us your story?
    I would never cross a picket line. I participated in the last "Big Five" strike on Oahu. Those whom I personally knew who crossed the picket line did it for one reason: money. Not "concern for patient care," which is often cited by nurses who cross their own picket lines and scabs who come in from other parts of the country to reap the often obscene profits available to those who cross the line.
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    Last edit by cardiacRN2006 on Feb 22, '09
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    I guess that the decision to work during the strike is personal and different for everyone. I have worked both for union and nonunion hospitals and have experinced a strike and can say that it is not pleasant. However, during the strike a few years ago I did decide to cross the picket lines.

    CardiacRN, you are right. People are afraid to come forward about this. I know a lot of nurses who have crossed during the strike but will never admit it. Many of them have had friends turn on them, have had death threats called to their homes, and other very unfortunate occurences.

    While caring for patients is the oath that we all take, and there is some truth to the fact that patient care is important to those who cross the line, I will not lie to say that money is not an important motivator.

    Personally, I have my own reasons for crossing the line. As a single parent with no other means of supporting my children, I made the difficult decision to provide for my family. I had tried to get employment elsewhere through agencies, but shifts were few and far between, as other strikers where also filling those slots.

    While I understand the issues that the Kauai nurses are going through and feel very sad for them, if it came down to a decision of feeding my children and walking the line, my children will always come first. Those people who cross the line are not the bad guys, we did not make the bad policies. We are just normal people trying to survive.

    I know that many people will take offense to this post, and that is their right. I am just being honest.

    CardiacRN, I wish you and your mother luck, and hope that the strike is over quickly, and you all can get back to your lives.:wink2:
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    Quote from jdtrn
    I guess that the decision to work during the strike is personal and different for everyone. I have worked both for union and nonunion hospitals and have experinced a strike and can say that it is not pleasant. However, during the strike a few years ago I did decide to cross the picket lines.

    CardiacRN, you are right. People are afraid to come forward about this. I know a lot of nurses who have crossed during the strike but will never admit it. Many of them have had friends turn on them, have had death threats called to their homes, and other very unfortunate occurences.

    While caring for patients is the oath that we all take, and there is some truth to the fact that patient care is important to those who cross the line, I will not lie to say that money is not an important motivator.

    Personally, I have my own reasons for crossing the line. As a single parent with no other means of supporting my children, I made the difficult decision to provide for my family. I had tried to get employment elsewhere through agencies, but shifts were few and far between, as other strikers where also filling those slots.

    While I understand the issues that the Kauai nurses are going through and feel very sad for them, if it came down to a decision of feeding my children and walking the line, my children will always come first. Those people who cross the line are not the bad guys, we did not make the bad policies. We are just normal people trying to survive.

    I know that many people will take offense to this post, and that is their right. I am just being honest.

    CardiacRN, I wish you and your mother luck, and hope that the strike is over quickly, and you all can get back to your lives.:wink2:
    A striking nurse who has no choice but to cross the line to feed her children is vastly different from the scabs who fly in just to make money.

    When I was on strike here a few years ago I knew some nurses who went back to work because the hospital where I was on strike cancelled our health insurance the day the strike started. One nurse had a very ill husband on many medications. Everyone understood why she had to return. She went back after talking to us, crying.

    Nobody with half a heart would blame her.

    There is a world of difference between her situation and the wise-cracking, arrogant scabs that came from the mainland to take advantage of the situation here.
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    I was just curious why nurses who strike are against travelor's who step in to take advantage of said strike.

    I am a nursing student and live in the south, an area where unionized nursing is uncommon. Having no experience with such a subject aside from just reading bits and pieces on this forum, I have no firm opinion on the subject and I am intrigued by some of the responses.

    It seems to me that if a group of unionized nurses decide to strike in order to meet their needs (better pay/staffing or what have you), then it is expected that someone will have to step in to meet the patient's needs. After all, the nurses are against either management/legistalures/hospital policy, not the actual patients, right? So I do not understand why the nurses on strike would act so hostile towards the nurses who step in to care for their patients.

    It is my understanding that hospitals pay very high $$$ during a strike to meet their staffing needs on short notice, which is not desireable. I would think that it doesn't hinder negotiations with the strikers. And if another nurse can step in and provide pt care, make a decent buck, and give you the time to negotiate for better working conditions...then why the hostility...calling them scabs?

    If I were to travel to an area on strike, I would feel like I was doing two things...providing support to the patients and to the nurses. I would only feel like I was sabotaging the strike by accepting a really low wage, which would give the hospital more time to delay negotiations.

    No flames please. I would love to hear all sides of the argument.
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    Quote from asoldierswife05
    i was just curious why nurses who strike are against travelor's who step in to take advantage of said strike.

    i am a nursing student and live in the south, an area where unionized nursing is uncommon. having no experience with such a subject aside from just reading bits and pieces on this forum, i have no firm opinion on the subject and i am intrigued by some of the responses.

    it seems to me that if a group of unionized nurses decide to strike in order to meet their needs (better pay/staffing or what have you), then it is expected that someone will have to step in to meet the patient's needs. after all, the nurses are against either management/legistalures/hospital policy, not the actual patients, right? so i do not understand why the nurses on strike would act so hostile towards the nurses who step in to care for their patients.

    it is my understanding that hospitals pay very high $$$ during a strike to meet their staffing needs on short notice, which is not desireable. i would think that it doesn't hinder negotiations with the strikers. and if another nurse can step in and provide pt care, make a decent buck, and give you the time to negotiate for better working conditions...then why the hostility...calling them scabs?

    if i were to travel to an area on strike, i would feel like i was doing two things...providing support to the patients and to the nurses. i would only feel like i was sabotaging the strike by accepting a really low wage, which would give the hospital more time to delay negotiations.

    no flames please. i would love to hear all sides of the argument.
    this article says it all:

    american nurses association | the american nurse september/october 2000

    and as one who participated in a seven-week-long strike here i can tell you that scabs who fly in here from other areas of the country are totally reviled by nurses walking the line.

    they are nothing but "mercenary nurses." sort of like the opportunistic diseases of the nursing world.
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    Quote from windwardoahurn
    this article says it all:

    american nurses association | the american nurse september/october 2000

    and as one who participated in a seven-week-long strike here i can tell you that scabs who fly in here from other areas of the country are totally reviled by nurses walking the line.

    they are nothing but "mercenary nurses." sort of like the opportunistic diseases of the nursing world.
    interesting article. thank you.

    so basically, your position is that if there were no nurses willing to step in to care for patients, then the hospitals would be forced to meet the striking demands immediately, and that nurses who break the strike by providing pt care (even at an excessive wage) are still prolonging the striking process and prohibiting the advancement of the nursing profession for which the strike (initiated as a last resort) was intended to accomplish? do i understand that correctly?
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    Quote from asoldierswife05

    so basically, your position is that if there were no nurses willing to step in to care for patients, then the hospitals would be forced to meet the striking demands immediately, and that nurses who break the strike by providing pt care (even at an excessive wage) are still prolonging the striking process and prohibiting the advancement of the nursing profession for which the strike (initiated as a last resort) was intended to accomplish? do i understand that correctly?
    :yeahthat:

    if now one is available to replace you, don't you think facility would take discuss your workplace concerns to be able to have patient care provided and business rolling along?

    when surgeon's squawk over delays in surgery, tests not being completed timely and threaten to move practice to another facility, management goes great job of listening to their needs..........unless they know of another area surgeon willing to jump ship and join their team who has more clout

    look for more of authors commentary (member -jt ) in _rns on strike
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Oct 17, '06
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    Last edit by cardiacRN2006 on Feb 22, '09


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