Which branch is better for nursing? - page 4

I hear that a certain area of the miltary for nursing is better. I need to know which one is better and why I haven't done thorough research but. I want to do the Nurse Navy Corps. But a friend of... Read More

  1. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Care&Joy
    Hey Gen, If I had to choose, I'd see if there was a way you could "unwaive" the waiver you signed, since you haven't officially signed any contract, & would take the CC course! From there, you could easily acquire the ER knowledge w/ the CC knowledge & learn your community knowledge through other courses. That way, you at least have some "free" education in addition to community stuff you decide to take later. W/ your BSN, you'll probably have people opening their doors wide for you to share in community projects w/ them too! Is there a career counselor that could help you decide which way to go?
    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Holly
    Hi,
    Yeah, I am thinking about it.

    Not that it really matters but I am going in with a MSN-generalist entry degree.

    My masters is not an advanced practice masters but an entry generalists', (similar to how a BSN is not advanced compared to an ADN but is a Baccelarueat, mine will be entry also but a Master's).

    However, I am really interested in the long-term goal too...argh. I would go for the critical care now too, right now though I really want to get the "official' call to come in and sign my contract!

    About two weeks ago I got the "unofficial" welcome to the Army but, it has been nothing since then and the board is reviewing my application.

    I figure that the holiday may have taken two days but, cannot figure how long it will take the board to review my application, (I had six undergrad institutions, several jobs and many former addresses that they need to check out and that could take a long time!)

    The reason there are six undergrad institution is that I attended three junior college through the years, just to take classes of interest, getting an associate's degree from one and I also attended three different Universities on route to earning my BA, (I moved, transferred and finally chose the right one and the right degree for me).
    Thanks Holly, I will try to keep waiting patiently.
    Gen
    Last edit by Gennaver on Nov 24, '06
  2. by   guerrierdelion
    Quote from `M3.
    Well I am working on getting my ASN...and along with that I recieve a diploma in Nursing..Because before that I attended a 4 yr school but money was tight and i was unable to return to that school..So I'm starting over..well not completely....I don't want to be deployed..But I really wanted to go to the Navy before but parents wouldn't allow me..And I want to work for the government.

    My questions are

    What benefits do you gain in the Navy?
    What is the Nurse Navy Corps all about?
    Are there different benefits withe Navy Nurse Corps than the Navy itself?
    Do Nurses in the Navy experience in different fields of Nursing?
    If you go into the Navy Nurse Corps with a degree is it different than a person who has no degree?

    I don't want to overflow you with question but these are the ones I can think of for now...Thanks
    [FONT="Georgia"]
    [FONT="Georgia"]Hello-come on over and check out my reply on the "Male Nursing Student" forum where I suggested some options for someone interested in obtaining their RN by &/or through the Navy as an ENLISTED military member but equally applicable to the other branches of service.
  3. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Not possible.

    When I was on active duty (I wasn't a nurse then), we were required to do 2 OUTUS (outside the continental US) tours for every CONUS (inside the continential US) tour.

    As far as reserves? Many times, reservists will be called up to fill CONUS jobs of active duty members so that those members can be deployed. But ask the thousands of reservists in Iraq and Afganistan if you can avoid being deployed in the reserves.

    If being deployed is not an option, the military is not an option. After all, once you swear that oath, that option is no longer yours. You serve the needs of the military, not the other way around. While they DO try to accomodate, they do so by first looking at THEIR needs.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Yes remember this, he has a good point. War is war. If they need you, they will deploy you.
  4. by   teiladay
    Quote from `M3.
    I hear that a certain area of the miltary for nursing is better. I need to know which one is better and why I haven't done thorough research but. I want to do the Nurse Navy Corps. But a friend of mine said that I should look into the Airforce its way better..I need other opinions beside one.So my questions are..

    Which area of the miltary has a better nursing program?
    Which one do you benefit more from?
    Is each branch of the miltary program for nursing varies for person

    I need as much info on each branch if that is okay thanks
    if you have any inputs or recommendations that would be nice
    Understand that there is a HUGE difference between being an OFFICER in the military and being ENLISTED. Don't let anyone tell you different.

    Enlisted nurse in the Army? You might be working in the motorpool 2 days out of the week, or taking "head-count" at the chow hall, and perhaps most important, receive pay that is ridiculous compared to people who come in with a college degree as officers.

    The worse thing you can ever do when dealing with the military is go only by what "your friend said" or the "recruiter said", etc., etc. Try to JOB SHADOW someone for a week at least in the job that you want BEFORE you even think about signing up. Be smart before signing the dotted line!

    Education in the military is paramount. a 4 year degree in nursing, or GRAD SCHOOL or PROFESSIONAL degrees in certain fields such as:

    1. LAW

    (3 years after your undergrad) you will recieve "constructive" credit for your time spent in law school, so you'd typically come in as a 1LT and make CPT typically in about 6+ months after. You could expect to make the rank of Major (O4) about 6-7 years later.. around your 10th year of active federal service if you've no prior active duty military experience.

    * constructive credit for school means basically that the military considers the duration of your school, as if you were serving those years on active duty. EXAMPLE: You have a friend that goes into the military as an enlisted person as an E1 and after 3 years they'd be no higher typically than an E4.
    The current 2006 pay for an E4 with over 3 years of service is $1842.
    Compare that to you coming in as an officer at the rank of O3 (Captain in most branches), which pays $3941 !! Okay, now hopefully you see how much education pays in the military (civilian sector as well).

    ** I would absolutely not recommend enlisting if you have the opportunity to get some education first and come in as an officer -or- unless you wish to work in a field that is an enlisted specific occupation.

    2. Masters Science Nursing (you'd get 2 years constructive credit for having a degree past the BSN).

    3. Veterinarian? You come in as a Captain in the Army 03, which pays$3221 per month base pay for absolutely NO military experience.
    Compare that to coming in as a private with no education, making LESS THAN $1500 per month.

    You get the idea.

    Got your BSN, then worked 2 years or so before coming in as an officer? You might be eligible for 2 years "credit" for your work experience.

    Prior military service with say 8 years enlisted time, you went to nursing school and earned a BSN? Hmmmm.. then you'd come in as an OFFICER with 8 years prior service credit. You could expect at the LEAST to come in as an 01E, with a base pay of $3366.

    Remember.... you can always have education and come in as an enlisted person. But basically if you don't have an education... you won't come in as an officer.

    Do yourself a favor and give yourself the most options.

    Some will say that they get the most satisfaction serving their country, blah, blah, blah, and thats GREAT!! As a veteran I can say that it was a great ride serving in the military. But when it comes to paying a mortgage, putting braces on teeth, band camp, summer camp, saving for your kid's college education, trips to see the world, car payments, etc., etc.. enlisted pay is just horrible when compared to officer counterparts.

    Very few enlisted make E9. An E9 with 26 years of service makes $5394
    Thats almost 30 years of a persons life folks!

    Over 80% of officers make 04. At only 10 years they're making $5482.20 :spin:

    hmmmmmmmm....

    Education... get it. never rip yourself off.
  5. by   teiladay
    I'll add. Don't base your impression on any one particular base or duty site no matter what branch you consider. Many recruiters can get you on base and around the job that you're curious about.. use whatever resourses you can, to get as much of a warm-n-fuzzy feeling about the job that you'd like to do in the military. Talk to various people (in different jobs!) about their impression of the particular branch that they are in.

    Please keep in mind that the more senior person you talk to, the more politically correct answers you'll get. Talk to O1 and O2 officers if you plan on a commission.... or talk to E3 and E4 persons if you're looking at enlisting.

    These folks will usually give you the down and dirty about their experiences in the military.

    Best of luck to you!
  6. by   `M3.
    Quote from teiladay
    Understand that there is a HUGE difference between being an OFFICER in the military and being ENLISTED. Don't let anyone tell you different.

    Enlisted nurse in the Army? You might be working in the motorpool 2 days out of the week, or taking "head-count" at the chow hall, and perhaps most important, receive pay that is ridiculous compared to people who come in with a college degree as officers.

    The worse thing you can ever do when dealing with the military is go only by what "your friend said" or the "recruiter said", etc., etc. Try to JOB SHADOW someone for a week at least in the job that you want BEFORE you even think about signing up. Be smart before signing the dotted line!

    Education in the military is paramount. a 4 year degree in nursing, or GRAD SCHOOL or PROFESSIONAL degrees in certain fields such as:

    1. LAW

    (3 years after your undergrad) you will recieve "constructive" credit for your time spent in law school, so you'd typically come in as a 1LT and make CPT typically in about 6+ months after. You could expect to make the rank of Major (O4) about 6-7 years later.. around your 10th year of active federal service if you've no prior active duty military experience.

    * constructive credit for school means basically that the military considers the duration of your school, as if you were serving those years on active duty. EXAMPLE: You have a friend that goes into the military as an enlisted person as an E1 and after 3 years they'd be no higher typically than an E4.
    The current 2006 pay for an E4 with over 3 years of service is $1842.
    Compare that to you coming in as an officer at the rank of O3 (Captain in most branches), which pays $3941 !! Okay, now hopefully you see how much education pays in the military (civilian sector as well).

    ** I would absolutely not recommend enlisting if you have the opportunity to get some education first and come in as an officer -or- unless you wish to work in a field that is an enlisted specific occupation.

    2. Masters Science Nursing (you'd get 2 years constructive credit for having a degree past the BSN).

    3. Veterinarian? You come in as a Captain in the Army 03, which pays$3221 per month base pay for absolutely NO military experience.
    Compare that to coming in as a private with no education, making LESS THAN $1500 per month.

    You get the idea.

    Got your BSN, then worked 2 years or so before coming in as an officer? You might be eligible for 2 years "credit" for your work experience.

    Prior military service with say 8 years enlisted time, you went to nursing school and earned a BSN? Hmmmm.. then you'd come in as an OFFICER with 8 years prior service credit. You could expect at the LEAST to come in as an 01E, with a base pay of $3366.

    Remember.... you can always have education and come in as an enlisted person. But basically if you don't have an education... you won't come in as an officer.

    Do yourself a favor and give yourself the most options.

    Some will say that they get the most satisfaction serving their country, blah, blah, blah, and thats GREAT!! As a veteran I can say that it was a great ride serving in the military. But when it comes to paying a mortgage, putting braces on teeth, band camp, summer camp, saving for your kid's college education, trips to see the world, car payments, etc., etc.. enlisted pay is just horrible when compared to officer counterparts.

    Very few enlisted make E9. An E9 with 26 years of service makes $5394
    Thats almost 30 years of a persons life folks!

    Over 80% of officers make 04. At only 10 years they're making $5482.20 :spin:

    hmmmmmmmm....

    Education... get it. never rip yourself off.
    thank you for pin pointiong this out...
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from `M3.
    thank you for pin pointiong this out...
    Hello,

    edit ahead, to add:

    I do not necessarily agree with the poster who told you to get your BSN and work two years...

    You are an ADN? You have your RN? The Army reserves will accept that degree as entry, or you could continue to work on your BSN and acess to active duty.

    Besides, from what I hear the Military will not give a person credit for two years of Civilian nursing as equivalent to 2 years Military nursing, I think it is 2 to 1 for the first five years.

    Also, if a person accesses in as anything beyone the 2LT then all of their own learning curve will be on display for future reviews. Anything beyond a 2LT in regards to our own personal reviews are permanent record in our file. I wouldn't want that as a new to Military person, I need that learning curve! end edit back to initial reply...

    Please note that not all MS nurses are the same. My MS is an entry level, (just as the BSN is entry and the ADN is entry). So, I have an MS generalist degree not an MS advanced practice.

    I receive no constructive credit for my MS. I am entering in as a 2LT.

    This is to my benefit since I "am" a new nurse graduate AND new to Military.

    Since I will have an MS it would be very misleading if I was ranked anything other than a 2LT.

    Oh, it might be confusing for some people to see MS with a 2LT but, I dont' care. In a year or so it won't matter any more because I will not be new to Military and will no longer be a newly minted RN either.

    Good luck!
    Gen
    Last edit by Gennaver on Jun 24, '07 : Reason: rampant typos
  8. by   sholtzma
    Hello All -

    First of all, I want to thank all of you folks who have taken a lot of time to painstakingly point out tons of details that those of us who aren't familiar with the military, how the branches work, etc. I for one am very grateful. I have read numerous threads (and I went through every single page of a forum thread last night that had 25+ pages of discussion about military nursing) and now have a much better idea of what the military is all about, plan of action if interested, etc. Again, thanks!

    A little bit about myself - I am currently a scientist working on fruit fly genetics. I have a BS in Biology from a great university but am 35 years old, and needing a change of scenery. I don't have anything really tying me down, and am very intrigued about Navy Nursing due to the travel aspect, apparent work satisfaction overall from reading this forum, etc. I was really surprised to see all of the positive remarks that military nursing overall has received on this forum.

    I can take my prerequisites for an accelerated BSN program this year, and probably do a 12-18 month accelerated program next fall or spring. That will put me at 38 or 39 when finally deciding, but I will still be within the age limits of Navy Nursing (of course, there are waivers). Here are a couple of strategic planning questions that I would like to get your feedback on:

    Navy Nursing still the best option? I am most interested in the travel aspect and would like to be moved around a lot. AF sounds good but also sounds more stationary/US oriented.

    Are the Navy Nursing uniforms really all that bad? JK, I couldn't care less what I'm wearing.

    Is Officer school very scary? I am physically fit, but am afraid of being in with a bunch of 20 year olds that will look at me like I'm crazy.

    What plan of action on the accelerated BSN? Should I just pay for it, with the idea of just scooping up the sign-on or should I talk to an officer recruiter about six months into the program and get them to pay for it? I don't have any qualms about deployment or commitment to several years of service - after all, it's the military.

    Thanks in advance for all the help!
  9. by   Gennaver
    Quote from sholtzma
    Hello All -

    First of all, I want to thank all of you folks who have taken a lot of time to painstakingly point out tons of details that those of us who aren't familiar with the military, how the branches work, etc. I for one am very grateful. I have read numerous threads (and I went through every single page of a forum thread last night that had 25+ pages of discussion about military nursing) and now have a much better idea of what the military is all about, plan of action if interested, etc. Again, thanks!

    A little bit about myself - I am currently a scientist working on fruit fly genetics. I have a BS in Biology from a great university but am 35 years old, and needing a change of scenery.

    ...I can take my prerequisites for an accelerated BSN program this year, and probably do a 12-18 month accelerated program next fall or spring. That will put me at 38 or 39 when finally deciding, but I will still be within the age limits of Navy Nursing (of course, there are waivers).

    ...Thanks in advance for all the help!
    Hello Sholtzma,

    Firstly, since I am also a post bacc nurse I would like to ask for you to join ranks with the folks who do not use the misnomer "accelerated" because it is deceptively confusing to non post bacc nurses.

    So, you are interested in a "post-bacc BSN program", right?

    I also would like to suggest that you look into becoming a medical officer now as you may already have most if not all the nursing pre-reqs done right now and would not be the first Biology researcher to commission in while working towards your RN.

    Good luck!
    Gen
  10. by   sholtzma
    Thank you, Gen. It is true that there is a BIG difference between an acc. BSN and an acc. BSN for degree holders. Wasn't even thinking.....

    So would it be wise to join as an officer (pre-"BSN" but in the program already, so guaranteed to at least be eligible to become an RN at some point) and get the seniority situation started, or does it not matter? From reading dozens of discussion pages on this forum, it seems that people have much better bargaining power holding an RN/BSN than not.

    Also, does the Navy really offer the most mobility options? This is something I would really like to get out of my military experience. I would like to hear people's histories/stories on this if possible.

    sholtzma
  11. by   richardjboro1
    I'd like to add my 2 cents to the question on "mobility" by the scientist above. I'd have to think that the Army would be as mobile if not MORE mobile than the Navy. My family went all over US, Europe and Far East with the Army and mostly stayed CONUS with the Navy, but perhaps it's changed in recent years. I would speak with a medical recruiter. They tend to know their stuff.


    Richard
  12. by   sholtzma
    Richard,

    I do think that the Army, especially right now with the Iraq war, is probably going to offer the most mobility opportunities - my husband's brother was in the Army for 20+ years and went just about everywhere in the world that you could possibly go in the military - but I was seduced early by the Navy's website and uniforms.

    All kidding aside, I can't tell you why, but I am just in love with the Navy Nursing idea....I guess it's just a psychological thing. I have plenty of time to check out all branches and do my homework (I have prereq classes this fall, spring and summer for pre-BSN so I have a lot of time to think about it). This must be why most people are really in favor of a certain branch of the military; it's kind of like rooting for your favorite ball team! And honestly, reading hundreds of posts from allnurses has made it even more difficult, as surprisingly, most people are very positive about each branch that they served in, and left a great impression of every branch. This has actually made things more difficult to decide and think about.

    Anyway, I still have an unanswered question -should I join as an officer midway through the post-bacc. accelerated BSN program or wait until finished and then offer myself? Will a recruiter honestly answer this?

    Thanks for all help!
    sholtzma
  13. by   richardjboro1
    Anyway, I still have an unanswered question -should I join as an officer midway through the post-bacc. accelerated BSN program or wait until finished and then offer myself? Will a recruiter honestly answer this?



    On that topic, not sure what to advise. I'm currently a jr BSN student and I plan to wait until I graduate. I did look into the ANCP (Army Nurse Candidate Program), but found out that it was worth more, re: loan repayment to wait until I graduate. I guess it's an individual decision, and I think most recruiters would be helpful, but some will pressure you to join ASAP. Good luck with the decision.

    Richard

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