Which branch is better for nursing? - page 3

I hear that a certain area of the miltary for nursing is better. I need to know which one is better and why I haven't done thorough research but. I want to do the Nurse Navy Corps. But a friend of... Read More

  1. by   MurseNeutron
    im a military nurse and if you want shorter deployments, more money, less BS, better educational classes, better food, more time off, better living quarters, people that dont loose your paperwork, health care that works when you need it, and a job that is more oriented to your needs and sacrifices that you give to serve go air force. i have worked with all three branches and for medical its the way to go.

    i work oversees as a deployed nurse and the experience and learning curve is unbelievable here. some of the best in the world are here. through the navy, airforce, and army you could end up at a lvl one trauma center. see all three and pick the one that gives you the best benefits and sign on bonuses, not to mention, where you want to go. also consider that the army does not cater to their soldiers with living quarters, food, and the little things, though you will become a tuffer person dealing with all of it, lol. but why?? remember you are sacrificing your freedom so others can have it. make sure your job supports you because you have put the time in by earning your degree already.

    i hope that wasn't over the top all in all just remember what my mentors have told me.

    Make the military work for you because if not it will work you... get out of it as much as possible; believe me they will take it from you.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I agree with the poster who said, if you do not wish to be deployed, do not join the military. Once you raise that right hand and swear to defend and protect, AND obey all the orders of officers appointed over you, well....

    all bets are off.

    You best think twice if you do not like the idea of deploying to Iraq, Afghanistan or other locations. Think twice.
  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I agree with the poster who said, if you do not wish to be deployed, do not join the military. Once you raise that right hand and swear to defend and protect, AND obey all the orders of officers appointed over you, well....

    all bets are off.

    You best think twice if you do not like the idea of deploying to Iraq, Afghanistan or other locations. Think twice.

    Hello Smiling Blue Eyes,

    I am glad to read this straightforward type of post.

    Since I will be a new graduate nurse I had the (possible) disillusionment thinking that it would be a minimum of one year before I could be deployed. My thought was that since the Army requires its nurses to have one to two year clinical bedside med/surg experience before the qualify for the general courses then that meant that it would also be one to two years before they would deploy new nurses.

    Now I realize that maybe they do not require the critical care course or the full year bedside before chance of deployment?

    So, this makes me really step up my temp foster situation schedule for my three kitties because that is the last thing I want to stress about once I get my future deployment orders.
    Gen
  4. by   Care&Joy
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hello Smiling Blue Eyes,

    I am glad to read this straightforward type of post.

    Since I will be a new graduate nurse I had the (possible) disillusionment thinking that it would be a minimum of one year before I could be deployed. My thought was that since the Army requires its nurses to have one to two year clinical bedside med/surg experience before the qualify for the general courses then that meant that it would also be one to two years before they would deploy new nurses.

    Now I realize that maybe they do not require the critical care course or the full year bedside before chance of deployment?

    So, this makes me really step up my temp foster situation schedule for my three kitties because that is the last thing I want to stress about once I get my future deployment orders.
    Gen
    Hey Gen! The one thing I heard was about a nurse (that was a contact of an AF nurse I was speaking w/) who was in the Army as a new grad nurse, &, instead of being able to work a full year in med/surg & then go into one of the specialty programs, I think after 8 months on the med/surg she was deployed for about 11 months. But, from other things I hear, I think they try their best to keep their new nurses in med/surg for a year first before anything, as they really hope to give their nurses the best experience & knowledge before going off into some strange land. I guess we'll find out sooner than later, huh?! :imbar

    Holly
  5. by   MurseNeutron
    my first deployment was in the icu. i went straight from school and bam. believe me the icu course, acls, tncc, abls, pals etc... you will get them. the military has recurring courses for each class every few weeks to months and plenty of people to teach them. if you want experience and are willing to be flexible (highly flexible) its the way to go. especially if you can get germany. the icu here is amazing..... believe me though no experience is required as long as you got that lisence and two there is no such policy about not being able to deploy for a year. if you go active you best be picking where you want to go because you will be deployed. if your serious about your career and want to learn though it might be a sacrafice you can make. my learning curve has been straight up for a few years now and i have been around the world including japan and all over europe dealing with everything from cardiac to 90% burns..... think about it, but make a plan, much dedication involved, but it forces you do learn and work at top speed. its a good stepping stone.
  6. by   olivedrab
    dear MurseNeutron,

    thank you for your posts. always appreciate hearing from those who are actually out there serving.
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Care&Joy
    Hey Gen! The one thing I heard was about a nurse (that was a contact of an AF nurse I was speaking w/) who was in the Army as a new grad nurse, &, instead of being able to work a full year in med/surg & then go into one of the specialty programs, I think after 8 months on the med/surg she was deployed for about 11 months. But, from other things I hear, I think they try their best to keep their new nurses in med/surg for a year first before anything, as they really hope to give their nurses the best experience & knowledge before going off into some strange land. I guess we'll find out sooner than later, huh?! :imbar

    Holly
    Hi Holly,
    Yes we will!

    I will step up my temp kitty foster home so that it can be ready in a moment's notice, (for at least a year long deployment or even if last minute 4 month's training).

    Gen
  8. by   Gennaver
    Quote from MurseNeutron
    my first deployment was in the icu. ...

    Hi there,

    Do you mean deployment or base assignment or was your fist base assingment a deployment?

    ?

    I have my base preference list and realize that it is just a wish list and that I may be assigned anyplayce but, I do not think that I could manage to take my three cats to Japan, Germany or Hawaii. Sadly, it sounds like the temp foster would be for much longer than the generaly year of deployment.

    It sounds like it would be for my whole six active duty years! Really?

    What about getting based here in the States? Can't that happen too?
    Gen
    edited to add: wait, I waived the general course program, (with ob/gyn, critical care and psychiatric) because I was interested in the ER and community health, in order to be eligible for those I had to wave the GCPS, (right acronym?) so, I do not think I am eligible for the icu training...Gosh, I don't know what is up now.
    Last edit by Gennaver on Nov 21, '06
  9. by   MurseNeutron
    as an officer coming in for the army you have to have an identifier to your MOS to work in the ICU, which im sure can be added through your command or andy retention OIC. Im pretty sure that this goes through with any branch of the military. As long as you are not currently deployed they are willing to send you icu course to add the identifier, unless you have exp., which im sure they would work with you then. your three choices need to be your home base of record. unfort. going over seas you prob wouldn't be able to bring your cats right away, but arriving shortly after you would probably be living on the economy in your parenting country, which at that time your cats could be shipped over. its a little work, but anything is possible just need to know who to ask. bring these situations up with your recruiter and they will so work with you. unfort. sometimes in the military you have be the politest pain in the ass as possible so dont take no for an aswer! if you want something though go get it and id be glad to help if i can. believe though even if you were to start on a med/surg floor acls, icu short course/courses are available. thats the brilliant part about the military is that you control your own education (sometimes they force it on you, lol ) but all the time the classes are there to take and no one will ever deny you taking them (and all free!) though you might have to do some on your own time. hit me up and tell me how it goes.
  10. by   Gennaver
    Quote from MurseNeutron
    as an officer coming in for the army you have to have an identifier to your MOS to work in the ICU, which im sure can be added through your command or andy retention OIC. .
    Hello again,

    In order to qualify for the ER or community health training I had to officially and formally "waive" my right to the generic course program which trains for ICU and so on.

    This will not be available to me as described per:

    Helpdesk Template

    and

    Army Nurse Corps

    However, I knew this when I waived them and just figured that I would have to do them on my own time, my own dime. I do want critical care training, (my clinical rotation in MICU was fantastic) but, I am also interested in the ER and eventually community health. I used to be an emt-a and eventually hope to work as a rural/remote nurse so these were more attractive to me.

    The Army will not train for both critical care, (generic courses) and the ER, that is, according to the documentation I was required to sign.
    As for worrying about trying to take my cats with me from base to base...that is not a stress I want to worry about.

    I have heard from enough people, about abandoned pets at bases, to know that I would rather they be safely with a foster family for my deployments or temporary assignmets rather than stress about trying to get them to a kennel or have them quarantined for six months at some kennel before the country would allow me to let them come into my home.

    Pet-Fosters are the only way for my situation.

    I am alone, with no family to help, but, do have friends who could assist with this, thankfully.

    Thanks though,
    Gen
    Last edit by Gennaver on Nov 22, '06
  11. by   Care&Joy
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hi Holly,
    Yes we will!

    I will step up my temp kitty foster home so that it can be ready in a moment's notice, (for at least a year long deployment or even if last minute 4 month's training).

    Gen
    I hope it all works out for you & things go smoothly, Gen! Especially in the "kitty" department :flowersfo . I can understand that, as I have a little pomapoo puppy that will be hard to leave behind if/when I have to. It's always nice to have something cuddly to come home to, ha!

    I was wondering, when you signed the program waiver because you wanted to go into the ER, did you mention to them that you'd like to get ICU courses also? Is there an alternative? I was just asking because I was wanting to go critical care or ER too, but if I'd have to sign a waiver, I guess I'd have to think about just taking the CC courses.

    Holly
  12. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Care&Joy
    I hope it all works out for you & things go smoothly, Gen! Especially in the "kitty" department :flowersfo . I can understand that, as I have a little pomapoo puppy that will be hard to leave behind if/when I have to. It's always nice to have something cuddly to come home to, ha!

    I was wondering, when you signed the program waiver because you wanted to go into the ER, did you mention to them that you'd like to get ICU courses also? Is there an alternative? I was just asking because I was wanting to go critical care or ER too, but if I'd have to sign a waiver, I guess I'd have to think about just taking the CC courses.

    Holly
    Hi Holly,
    I didn't mention that I wanted to do both because the way it was written is that it is an either OR option. However, the way that it is written also leans heavily towards suggesting that the general course is the one encouraged and that the likelihood of training for ER or Community health is not a gauranteed one, as is the generic courses.

    Since I have not yet signed my contract I am on the fence and trying to decide if I want to "unwaive" that or just pursue the cc on my own.

    Gen
  13. by   Care&Joy
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hi Holly,
    I didn't mention that I wanted to do both because the way it was written is that it is an either OR option. However, the way that it is written also leans heavily towards suggesting that the general course is the one encouraged and that the likelihood of training for ER or Community health is not a gauranteed one, as is the generic courses.

    Since I have not yet signed my contract I am on the fence and trying to decide if I want to "unwaive" that or just pursue the cc on my own.

    Gen
    Hey Gen, If I had to choose, I'd see if there was a way you could "unwaive" the waiver you signed, since you haven't officially signed any contract, & would take the CC course! From there, you could easily acquire the ER knowledge w/ the CC knowledge & learn your community knowledge through other courses. That way, you at least have some "free" education in addition to community stuff you decide to take later. W/ your BSN, you'll probably have people opening their doors wide for you to share in community projects w/ them too! Is there a career counselor that could help you decide which way to go?
    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Holly

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